Want to be a nurse in Doctor's Office...which degree? ASN or BSN RN? - page 3

by mrspolly

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I have ruled out hospital RN jobs due to many factors. I am interested in working in a doctor's office as a nurse. Which degree should I go for? What are the majority looking for? Thanks!... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    Pain management clinics (at least here in So Cal) are small surgical clinics, so the RNs are doing PACU/Recovery work. A friend who works in one say she's busy with assessments and recovery from anesthesia all day!
    Ah. I'm the nurse manager for an ASC, and we DO use RNs (and LPNs) but I wouldn't consider hiring ANYONE who couldn't show me several years' worth of acute care experience. RNs in recovery need to know what to do, what to look for in someone "going south", and I'd never take someone fresh out of school for that. If someone does, well...I hope it works out for everyone. We're a small center and can't afford to have a newbie RN; it's the RN everyone will turn to for direction in a patient crisis.

    Anyway, by now the OP must realize what's ahead of her, at least generally speaking.
  2. 0
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Ah. I'm the nurse manager for an ASC, and we DO use RNs (and LPNs) but I wouldn't consider hiring ANYONE who couldn't show me several years' worth of acute care experience. RNs in recovery need to know what to do, what to look for in someone "going south", and I'd never take someone fresh out of school for that. If someone does, well...I hope it works out for everyone. We're a small center and can't afford to have a newbie RN; it's the RN everyone will turn to for direction in a patient crisis.

    Anyway, by now the OP must realize what's ahead of her, at least generally speaking.
    Yes, thank you! Not exactly what I was hoping for, but I do understand. Sounds like I have two options on either end of the spectrum....
    1. Be an MA and do menial "nursing" but have a regular schedule and low-stress environment
    2. Go for the RN and work the obligitory 2-3 years FT at a hospital to gain enough experience to then possibly move on to other areas.

    I appreciate all your comments!
  3. 0
    Most of the offices in my area hire MA's or LPN's. If you need a job soon, go the LPN route, you can always do an LPN to RN bridge if you want to continue on.
  4. 0
    I agree that you might be better off with an MA training versus nursing school, I believe you will get a much broader range of job opportunities than you would as an RN, if you don't mind the lower pay. As an RN, you might be able to get hired into clinics, e.g. GI clinics, spine clinics, etc. Those might not have your desired 9-5 but usually do not include weekends and holidays. Some OR nurses seem to have a nice schedule as well, but getting into an OR job as a new nurse is not easy. I don't know how much experience is expected for the clinic jobs.
  5. 1
    Quote from mrspolly
    I am not 100% against hospital nursing, in fact, it was my first thought when I started looking into nursing as an option. I love the idea of the more challenging environment. I think I would love to work in OB or Pediatrics. I don't want to be stuck taking blood pressures and weights for the rest of my career, but I figured there may be some challenging options in nursing in the doctor's office side of things. It may just be wishful thinking on my part.

    To be honest, I was all about hospital nursing until I really started reading the comments on this site. I have read so many people talk about how miserable hospital nursing is. From the long hours, understaffed crew, mistreatment from doctors/co-workers/patients to how hard it is to find a new grad position and how stressful the shifts are. I am at a serious cross roads here!

    UGH!!!
    Maybe I do have a unicorn job but...keep in mind we are "high volume/low acuity." Meaning, our patients aren't super sick but there are a lot of them and we are busy! The number of calls in a day is astounding and in our clinic, nurses get almost all of them. It's a challenge. Say, in an ICU setting, you have two patients, even with an admit and discharge or what have you, you might have a total of 3 patients in your busy 12 hour shift; in med surg you might have 6 or 8. In our clinic, between phone calls, walk-ins, and handling patient complaints, you might deal with 50 in a day.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  6. 0
    In my area many offices hire LPNs and MAs. They pay around 12 dollars an hour compared to LPNs at other facilities making 18 or so an hour. I however do think that they want at least a year of experience prior to hiring you in an office. RN school is hard and it takes time away from your family. It seems like I am in school, studying, or in clincials ALL the time. All but one of my children are in school so this helps. I do sometimes feel guilty for leaving the "baby" (she is 3) in pre-school but she LOVES it. Begs to go when she is at home.

    When I was looking for a job as a LPN I had the hardest time. I found one in a psych long term care facility.Most of my fellow students found jobs as LPN's in LTCs. Some of them fresh out of school got jobs Mon-Fri 6am-3pm.

    I am not sure what MA school is like.But PN school was 18 mths it cost 7000 for books and tuition. I liked working with the pts at my first job as an LPN but did not like the facility. So I decided to get my RN. I am going to try to get a night job when I graduate. This way I will be home at least Christmas morning to see the kids open their gifts and other holidays. I might be sleeping most of the day away but I will be there. Just an idea, not sure if you can do nights of not.

    No one can tell you what is best for you and your situation. However for what you want right now it might be best like others have said spend a few months becoming a MA or LPN. If you think when the kids are older that you might want to be an RN I would get your LPN, in my area having my LPN cuts a semester off of the program. Plus much of my first semester was a review of what I had learned in PN school (refreshing clinical skills, a brief review of the systems and major illnesses).

    Best of luck to you.
  7. 0
    My hospital has an outpatient building, for general outpatient care as one would get in a non-hospital affiliated doctor's office. almost all those offices run M-F 9-5 or something close to it (some might start at 8 and close at 6 or 7). So don't rule out all hospital jobs as being guaranteed odd hours.
  8. 0
    Could you be a school nurse? They have a page under the specialties section where you might be able to learn more about how to get that type of job.

    I have a friend from church who has been a school nurse for 20 years. Now that her kids are out of school she also picks up extra shifts at a hosptial.
  9. 0
    Quote from RNsRWe

    Ah. I'm the nurse manager for an ASC, and we DO use RNs (and LPNs) but I wouldn't consider hiring ANYONE who couldn't show me several years' worth of acute care experience. RNs in recovery need to know what to do, what to look for in someone "going south", and I'd never take someone fresh out of school for that. If someone does, well...I hope it works out for everyone. We're a small center and can't afford to have a newbie RN; it's the RN everyone will turn to for direction in a patient crisis.

    Anyway, by now the OP must realize what's ahead of her, at least generally speaking.
    This is true in most cases, but my graduating cohort has seemed to find the DONs who understand that with the right training it can be done. As the CNO that hired me said "I find it best to grow my own"
  10. 0
    No apology needed, mrspolly! You were seeking information, which is a significant reason for the existence of this forum! If money is not a major concern, then CMA (certified medical assistant) would be the way to go. The pay is low, but so are the time demands. With experience, you may be able to move into higher-paying positions such as office manager or the like. If you go CMA, stick with community colleges if available -- the private schools are expensive and the quality varies greatly. Or look closely at LPN/LVN -- again, less money than RN, but with experience you can work in clinics or schools, depending on your location. As others have noted, opportunities as an RN will be very limited without first gaining that oh-so essential hospital experience -- it's just the nature of the beast as it currently stands.

    Your interests include children and education and you say you are a natural nurturer -- is teaching/early intervention/education out of the question? If you add "science" and "healthcare" to the equation, have you considered being a pediatric physical therapist or physical therapy assistant?


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