Short Cuts in Nursing - page 3

by NeuroMedic 5,402 Views | 23 Comments

I have noticed that alot of you out there are looking for transition programs, shortcuts, and the "easiest way". There are no true shortcuts in nursing. As Nurse Practitioner(MSN ACNP/FNP), I have worked my way from the... Read More


  1. 0
    Thanks for your reply.

    I am all for people who cant handle the demands of providing care
    for mulitple, acutely ill patients leaving the hospital environment to go
    shuffle papers at an insurance company, be a case worker or some other clerically related role. Frankly, if they cant cut it and have an attitude of superiority toward their fellow nurses, I would rather have them leave the team. They arent worth the negative impact they have on morale.

    When I mentioned being 'tempered', I was referring to being emotionally and psychologically prepared to work in an often difficult
    and very demanding work environment and still be pt focused and
    provide a high level of care. This maturity can only be obtained by a great deal of clinical experience which they hopefully received during their nursing education. Without this, nurses graduate and come into the hosiptal setting with 'pie in the sky' attitudes about how the system should be instead of prepared to deal with what it actually is today.

    If you read my post carefully, you would have seen my comments about a true clinical ladder which provides all nurses the ability to pursue advanced education. To may, the time required and the cost of an 'accepted standard collegiate education' is prohibitive which it has become for all many students regardless of they plan on studying in school. As for BSNs leaving BECAUSE THEY CAN, I would submit to you that a larger number of entry level RNs remain in a hospital enviroment BECAUSE THE CHOOSE TO STAY and
  2. 0
    A very interesting and enlightening thread thank you to the OP for starting it.
    Most of The 18 month students I have been meeting recently have frightened the life out of me by their lack of knowledge and experience, I am not finding them particularily educated in any area, and their practical experience is lacking, and whilst I do believe that the practical side develops post graduation, I do not believe they are getting the adequate training post graduation to develop these skill well.

    My hospital only gives 8 weeks supervised practice to new grads so that is 24 shifts to become fully functioning and then sent off on their own to manage.

    Yes we help out our new fledglings but we are so bogged down with an increased heavy workload because these nurses are now counted in the numbers but cannot manage the acutely ill.

    I believe all new grads should have a 6 month preceptor program available to them.
  3. 0
    Thanks for your reply.

    I am all for people who cant handle the demands of providing care for mulitple, acutely ill patients leaving the hospital environment to go shuffle papers at an insurance company, be a case worker or some other clerically related role. Frankly, if they cant cut it on the front line and have an attitude of superiority toward their fellow nurses, I would rather have them leave the team. They arent worth the negative impact they have on morale.

    When I mentioned being 'tempered', I was referring to being emotionally and psychologically prepared to work in an often difficult and very demanding environment while remaining patient focused and providing a high level of care. This maturity can only be obtained by a great deal of clinical experience which they hopefully received during their nursing education. Without this, nurses graduate and come into the hospital setting with 'pie in the sky' attitudes about how the system should be instead of prepared to deal with the reality of it.

    If you read my post carefully, you would have seen my comments about a true clinical ladder which provides all nurses the ability to pursue advanced education. To many, the time required and the cost of an 'accepted standard collegiate education' is prohibitive which it has become for many students regardless of their field of study. As for BSNs leaving BECAUSE THEY CAN, I would submit to you that a larger number of entry level RNs remain in a hospital enviroment BECAUSE THEY CHOOSE TO STAY and provide the care for those who are ill which was the reason they chose this profession.

    Again, we need our RNs with advanced education to recognize the contributions of RNs who graduate from all three paths of education. We are our own worst enemy when RNs with advanced education start picking apart the foundation of our profession, demean those who passed the same board and have they same license as a BSN. And by the way, being respected by their peers and partners in healthcare is a function of performing their job well, having confidence and speaking from an informed position - not because they have a BSN or higher degree and can spout nursing theory to those who have years of experience as a physician or registered nurse.

    I do not find your response laughable at all. It is truly sad and indicative of those in the "nursing" profession who have lost sight of fact that providing care for PATIENTS, not stroking their EGOS, is the foundation of the profession. As long as this visible infighting continues between peers and our governing bodies, the respect which we deserve as professional will elude us. Why would anyone respect us when we don't even have respect for each other?
  4. 0
    [

    I do not find your response laughable at all. It is truly sad and indicative of those in the "nursing" profession who have lost sight of fact that providing care for PATIENTS, not stroking their EGOS, is the foundation of the profession. As long as this visible infighting continues between peers and our governing bodies, the respect which we deserve as professional will elude us. Why would anyone respect us when we don't even have respect for each other?
    [/quote]

    I commend your enthusiasm and I agree with the majority of your post, however you must refrain from getting personal and remember if all RN's were like you we would not be facing the majority of the problems we face in nursing today. Everybody is entitle to their opinion, and it opens a healthy debate if we refrain from getting personnal


    Everybody Remember the TOS and keep your arguments professional


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