RN vs. BSN

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    I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just want nurses, not depending on length of school?!

    Thanks so much!
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  4. 0
    Yes I would like to know that too. I mean I live in Belgium and here I have a bachelor's degree in Nursing and one day I would like to work in the U.S.A. and they told me that if I want to work over there I have to take the NCLEX-RN test and I thougt that RN stands for Registered Nurse but now I see that there is a difference between RN and BSN so what would be my place if I come to work in the U.S.A. and exactly what is the difference between RN and BSN?
  5. 0
    Both are RNs who graduate and take the same NCLEX test and work as beginning level nurses at the bedside.

    The BSN will help you later on after you get BSN preferred positions in education, management, research, as well as other areas.

    It all depends on what you goals in nursing are. If you're unsure get your ADN and then get your BSN after that through one of the many ADN to BSN programs.

    I always advise getting the BSN as an investment in the future, especially for young people. One never knows what you want to do in 20 years.
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    mmarqua4 - in most small towns you are totally right - the facilities are looking for RNs period. However, as you get further along in your career, you will find more opportunities as a BSN.
  7. 1
    Quote from Afrolinda
    Yes I would like to know that too. I mean I live in Belgium and here I have a bachelor's degree in Nursing and one day I would like to work in the U.S.A. and they told me that if I want to work over there I have to take the NCLEX-RN test and I thougt that RN stands for Registered Nurse but now I see that there is a difference between RN and BSN so what would be my place if I come to work in the U.S.A. and exactly what is the difference between RN and BSN?
    Only difference here is that unless you pass the NCLEX, you're not considered a RN. BSN means you've earned a bachelor of science degree in nursing.
    luvazsun likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from mmarqua4
    I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just want nurses, not depending on length of school?!

    Thanks so much!
    Do a little more research on nursing. Go online and you could find a wealth of info. RNs go to school for either 2years(Associates degree) or 4 years(bachelors degree) at entry level.

    Try not to be overly concerned with the pay scale but rather if you see yourself enjoying that type of work. Such factors could determine what level you want to aspire to. All programs are challenging but if you see yourself serving others, then you would benefit from the social sciences and other aspect of the program. Don't let anyone tell you that you would never use a certain course that you're required to take.

    I remember having to take a course called nursing trend. That class prepared me to nuture myself as a caregiver. I recall volunteering for hospice and being a part of school nursing, and various outpatient clinics as requirements for the program. So the benefits are numerous depending on the program.
    Last edit by blady on Feb 20, '07
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    I can say from personal experience that I am glad that I went ahead and went straight for my BSN. It takes a lot less time and effort in the long run and you have a 4 year degree. Most smaller hospitals won't compensate you much for having your BSN but every little bit makes a difference. You can boost your salary further by completing competencies, certifications and participating in career ladder or employee incentive plans that are offered in varying degrees by most employers (I am speaking of hospitals mainly and larger employers). For instance, my company pays 1$/hr more for BSN RNs...not much but that is still something and it's kind of new actually since some places didn't even recognize the difference until fairly recently. With a BSN you are ready to step into leadership/management/teaching type positions once you get your experience under your belt. Also, you are ready to jump into masters and doctoral degrees if/when you decide to do that. In my mind you can't go wrong with a BSN.
  10. 0
    Quote from melissamward
    I can say from personal experience that I am glad that I went ahead and went straight for my BSN. It takes a lot less time and effort in the long run and you have a 4 year degree. Most smaller hospitals won't compensate you much for having your BSN but every little bit makes a difference. You can boost your salary further by completing competencies, certifications and participating in career ladder or employee incentive plans that are offered in varying degrees by most employers (I am speaking of hospitals mainly and larger employers). For instance, my company pays 1$/hr more for BSN RNs...not much but that is still something and it's kind of new actually since some places didn't even recognize the difference until fairly recently. With a BSN you are ready to step into leadership/management/teaching type positions once you get your experience under your belt. Also, you are ready to jump into masters and doctoral degrees if/when you decide to do that. In my mind you can't go wrong with a BSN.
    Way to go!
  11. 0
    Hi

    From personal experence a diploma vs. a BSN prepared nurse. I know the BSN has to take more pathopyhsilolgy, pharmacology and medical surgical nursing. I took like 6 credits of each when my ADN prepared friend had to only take two. BSN are also required to take research and community health while an ADN does not have to. I think with pay who cares about the difference because the BSN is geared more for if a person wants to go for masters or management. That is when the BSN will glorify on the money (with the exception of teaching they make squat no offense teachers).

    Just my 2 cents
  12. 0
    I am an ASN and currently pursuing my BSN (done in 8 weeks yay!):mortarboard: :caduceus:

    I have no regrets with the path I have taken. It only took me one more year to do this (considering I also have an AA degree).I would do it the same way if I had to do it all over again


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