RN vs. BSN RN vs. BSN - pg.4 | allnurses

RN vs. BSN - page 4

I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just... Read More

  1. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from lvnbaby
    I have a question... Once i get my adn, if i decide to
    go back for my bsn, do i have to take the nclex again???
    In other words, is the nclex rn the same for adn and bsn
    or diffrent
    *** Nope, once you pass the NCLEX you never have to take it again reguardless of what other degrees you get. An RN has a scope of practice. The RN scope of practice is exactly the same for an RN with an ADN as it is for an RN with a BSN or MSN, or DNP, or Phd. As far as scope of practice goes an RN is an RN. Some nurses with MSN or DNP are advanced practice nurses ( nurse practitioners, CRNA, clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse midwives) with a different scope of practice but they have their own certifying exams and still never need to take the NCLEX again.
    lvnbaby likes this.
  2. Visit  saralee728 profile page
    1
    Quote from mmarqua4
    I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just want nurses, not depending on length of school?!Thanks so much!
    Hi, I'm Sara! I am currently going for my associates RN, and it's great! Once I get my degree, I will get hired on at a hospital, and they will pay my schooling when I go back for my bsn/nurse practitioner. It's whatever I choose, and they pay it! My sister did the four year RN and she says she wishes she'd have done what I'm doing. Where we live, it's only .50 cents an hour less for a two year(associates) vs. four year(bachelors) RN. Good luck in every path you decide to take --Sara
    Lanilu likes this.
  3. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    1
    This thread is 4 years old. It's interesting seeing the opinion change from the idea that one only needs the BSN if going into public health, research, or management - to - you better get your BSN, the economy is bad, etc.
    lindarn likes this.
  4. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    1
    Quote from saralee728
    Hi, I'm Sara! I am currently going for my associates RN, and it's great! Once I get my degree, I will get hired on at a hospital, and they will pay my schooling when I go back for my bsn/nurse practitioner. It's whatever I choose, and they pay it! My sister did the four year RN and she says she wishes she'd have done what I'm doing. Where we live, it's only .50 cents an hour less for a two year(associates) vs. four year(bachelors) RN. Good luck in every path you decide to take --Sara
    Have you looked into this thoroughly? I work for a major academic medical center that advertises "tuition reimbursement" and they give a maximum of, I believe, $5000/year. Nowhere near enough to pay for another degree unless you go part-time and take years and years to finish it.
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from saralee728
    Hi, I'm Sara! I am currently going for my associates RN, and it's great! Once I get my degree, I will get hired on at a hospital, and they will pay my schooling when I go back for my bsn/nurse practitioner. It's whatever I choose, and they pay it! My sister did the four year RN and she says she wishes she'd have done what I'm doing. Where we live, it's only .50 cents an hour less for a two year(associates) vs. four year(bachelors) RN. Good luck in every path you decide to take --Sara
    I think you need ot double check.; Many new grads can't find jobs and have been unemployed for at least a year. The economy stinks, the market is tight, there is no shortage. Hospitals ahve cut benefits and tuition reimbursement is but a fraction and usually based on GPA. Nurse practioner's really are a Masters degree. You need to re look at your sources.

    I wish you luck....it's really tough right now. Search the site about uinemployed nurses and you will see. Peace
  6. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from KelRN215
    Have you looked into this thoroughly? I work for a major academic medical center that advertises "tuition reimbursement" and they give a maximum of, I believe, $5000/year. Nowhere near enough to pay for another degree unless you go part-time and take years and years to finish it.
    *** $5K/year is way more than enough to do RN to BSN. That's $10K over two years. I can thing of several RN to BSN programs that cost less than that. U of Wyoming, WGU, Ft.Hays State and others.
  7. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    I don't know of any programs in Massachusetts that cost less than $10K to complete. Google tells me the average cost for an RN-BSN program in Boston is over $20K/year. I did the straight BSN program so I can't say I've ever looked into the RN-BSN track but I have co-workers who did it and our "tuition reimbursement" did not cover the entire cost of their programs. Massachusetts is an expensive place to live. I imagine hospitals in other parts of the country where the cost of living is lower offer less for tuition reimbursement. I do not know of anyone who was able to complete another degree solely on the hospital's "tuition reimbursement program".

    And with all the "budget cuts" my hospital has been talking about lately, I'm sure before we know it this program will be non-existent. For all I know they may have already eliminated it without telling anyone.
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    i don't know of any programs in massachusetts that cost less than $10k to complete.

    *** maybe there are no programs in that state but what state a program is located in is irrelevent.

    google tells me the average cost for an rn-bsn program in boston is over $20k/year. i did the straight bsn program so i can't say i've ever looked into the rn-bsn track but i have co-workers who did it and our "tuition reimbursement" did not cover the entire cost of their programs.

    *** it did for mine, with room to spare. i just chose a less expensive program.

    massachusetts is an expensive place to live. i imagine hospitals in other parts of the country where the cost of living is lower offer less for tuition reimbursement.

    *** i live in a much lower cost of living area and our hospital offers much more than $5k/year in tution.

    i do not know of anyone who was able to complete another degree solely on the hospital's "tuition reimbursement program".

    *** i have many co-workers who have done or are doing so. i admit that if you want to do it with a $5k/year budget you will have to be selective about the school you choose but it is easily doable

    and with all the "budget cuts" my hospital has been talking about lately, i'm sure before we know it this program will be non-existent. for all i know they may have already eliminated it without telling anyone.

    *** do you work in a magnet hospital? in my area the magnet hospital have either eliminated their education assistance programs or cut them back drasticaly. lucky for me i got out of the magnet hospital rat race.
    Lanilu likes this.
  9. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    0
    There is way to strech that $5,000 a year(or whatever it is).

    Your hospital probably reimburses on the calender year, not the academic year.

    EXAMPLE.

    You could go 2012; Fall semester, get up to $5k
    2013; Spring & Fall, get up to $5k
    2014; Spring semester, get up to $5k

    SO, that's up to 15k reimbursement for a 2 year program. Of course, if it's more than $2,500 per semester you will pay out of pocket in 2013, but at this point your educational expenses will be tax deductable.
    Or, stretch it into a December 2014 graduation in the example above, and you can get reimbursed for more than one semester.
    Working for a living is hard work, some of you may decide to take more than 2 years for the BSN. Nothing wrong with that.
  10. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    The state would be relevant if it's the state you live in, work in and expect to continue your schooling in.

    The person who brought this up originally stated that as soon as she graduates with her ADN, she will get a job in a hospital and that hospital will pay for her BSN. I was only trying to say that- as a blanket statement- that's false. I don't know about the rest of the country, but in my area jobs for new grads are extremely hard to come by and most hospitals are requiring a BSN for new grads. I don't doubt that there are places that will pay the entire cost of another degree, I'm saying my facility isn't one of them. They offer a maximum of $5000 a year (part time employees get $2000 and most of my co-workers who were in school full-time had to drop to part-time status at work) and there are a lot of criteria employees must meet to get this money. Not to mention higher education in this part of the country is extremely expensive. I do know a former co-worker who attempted to do grad school in another state (her home state) while working on my floor. She didn't even last a whole semester before she quit and moved home.

    And yes, I work in a Magnet hospital. It sucks.
  11. Visit  astarrh1 profile page
    0
    I am applying to an online program to get my BSN and MSN. There are so many options now. Many 4 yr Universities now offer an online RN-BSN/MSN program, and many many many are less than 20K. There are several who offer the RN-BSN for around 7-8K. It just takes a little research and willingness to do the online channel. Best of luck to everyone who is making their way down that path.
  12. Visit  mceb59 profile page
    0
    Please go for the BSN right from the start. It will save time and money in the long run. But, more importantly, I encourage you to read several items: The multiple research studies completed by Linda Aiken and her colleagues that demonstrate that the larger the number of BSN educated nurses staffing an institution the lower the mortality rate; The Institute of Medicine Report of October 2010: The Future of Nursing; and please read some of the history of nursing.
    Think about these questions: What other health care discipline allows less than a bachelor's degree as entry into practice in the USA? Most have gone to the Doctoral level as entry into practice (PT, OT, Audiology, etc.) - why? What does it mean for the practice of nursing in the board rooms of health care agencies when nurses (who hopefully have at least a BSN or higher) are to be representing the interests of nurses, many of whom are not educated beyond the technical level (LPN, diploma, associates degree)? Ever wonder why nurses/nursing gets treated poorly? Read an old article by Luther Christman (1998) titled "Who is a nurse?" If a group does not have the education level necessary to "play the game" how can that group ever compete to better itself and working conditions?
    What does it mean that the Institute of Medicine is the body that is now setting standards for nursing?? Economic conditions change and vary across the USA. However, of all the bachelor's degrees one could obtain graduates with a BSN do get jobs and with a decent salary. A BA in psychology, a BA in sociology/social work and many other bachelors degrees require the graduate to go to graduate school and gain a master's degree or on for the doctorate to earn the salary of a BSN. In some locations practical nurses, diploma nurses and associate degree nurses cannot get jobs; yes magnet has much to do with this. But there too is another question - magnet, like JCAHO, is another quality credential - why is quality not wanted?
    So....get the BSN from the start...
    Last edit by mceb59 on May 26, '12 : Reason: error in date of IOM report
  13. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    think about these questions: what other health care discipline allows less than a bachelor's degree as entry into practice in the usa?


    *** respiratory therapy and physicians assistant come immediatly to mind.

    most have gone to the doctoral level as entry into practice (pt, ot, audiology, etc.) - why?

    *** i have often wondered this as well. i have some guesses but if you know please share.

    what does it mean for the practice of nursing in the board rooms of health care agencies when nurses (who hopefully have at least a bsn or higher) are to be representing the interests of nurses, many of whom are not educated beyond the technical level (lpn, diploma, associates degree)? ever wonder why nurses/nursing gets treated poorly?


    *** i don't get treated poorly. nurses in my hospital doens't get treated poorly. i get plenty of respect. also good benifits and am paid pretty well. of course i no longer work at a magnet hospital full time.

    what does it mean that the institute of medicine is the body that is now setting standards for nursing?? economic conditions change and vary across the usa. however, of all the bachelor's degrees one could obtain graduates with a bsn do get jobs and with a decent salary. a ba in psychology, a ba in sociology/social work and many other bachelors degrees require the graduate to go to graduate school and gain a master's degree or on for the doctorate to earn the salary of a bsn. in some locations practical nurses, diploma nurses and associate degree nurses cannot get jobs; yes magnet has much to do with this. but there too is another question - magnet, like jcaho, is another quality credential - why is quality not wanted?


    *** i worked at two different hospitals during their "journy to magnet" and sat on the committee. in my part of the usa magnet hospitals are gaining a reputation as not being good places to work. especialy among er & critical care types. in my opinion magnet does not indicate qualiety, but rather an indication that managment is more interested in the appereance over substance.

    so....get the bsn from the start...

    *** i agree, but for different reasons.

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