RN-MSN and getting a job/experience

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    Will it be hard to get or maintain a job while going to school from Rn straight to MSN? I know that they prefer a BSN over just RN. Also, will I miss out on experience, which employers also like, if I work as a RN with an associates degree? Do they like hiring and having to pay someone who went right from an associates to a masters?
  2. 2 Comments so far...

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    Wow, lots of questions! Don't know how much help I will be, but here it is....

    Will it be hard to get or maintain a job while going to school from Rn straight to MSN?
    On getting a job, maybe. It depends on the job market where you are. It is really hard for new RN's to find jobs in some areas. On maintaining a job, maybe. It depends on you. Can you handle the commitment of work and school?

    I know that they prefer a BSN over just RN.
    Not necessarily. In some areas yes, hospitals prefer BSN but in other areas that is not the case. Also hospitals are not the only places that hire RN's. As an aside...you just insulted a whole lot of "just RN's, so you may want to be more careful in the future how you word things.

    Also, will I miss out on experience, which employers also like, if I work as a RN with an associates degree?
    Sorry but this one just confuses me. How is working as an RN with an associates degree missing out on experience???

    Do they like ]
    hiring and having to pay someone who went right from an associates to a masters?
    "They" would like hiring and having to pay someone for a masters degree if a masters degree is the job requirement. It won't make a darn bit of difference if that Masters degree was obtained after an associate degree.
    Last edit by kbrn2002 on Aug 4, '13 : Reason: strange formatting
  4. 2
    In my experience, (non-academic) jobs that require MSN also require a significant amount of experience/expertise in a particular area. These jobs are for specialists - whose advanced skills & knowledge are valuable to the organization. These jobs range from leadership of special functions (infection control, risk management, quality, case management, education, etc.) to advanced skills to support/improve clinical care - clinical specialists & NPs.

    There are a lot of MSNs who are also employed in 'normal' bedside jobs that do not actually require MSNs. The bedside positions are where the entry-level masters nurses are hired also. In these types of positions, an MSN is not paid more than anyone else because it is not required and not associated with any type of skills/knowledge that adds value to the organization.

    I think that the OP may be confusing credentials with expertise. When it comes to jobs, these are two separate factors that are considered independently... Higher pay is associated with jobs that require both. Credentials could be the deciding factor for jobs that are more 'theoretical' in nature - but expertise is essential for any job that requires application of that knowledge. Hopefully, that makes sense.
    hdelarosa and llg like this.


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