RN-BSN and not working? - page 2

by jhunting | 5,542 Views | 20 Comments

I am currently finishing up my 4th semester in an ADN program and plan to begin a 1-year online RN-BSN program beginning in June. I am VERY interested in nurse residency programs in my area, but the only ones within reason... Read More


  1. 0
    Nurse residency programs are great. The reason why they want you to have less than 10-12 months exp. is because it is only meant for new grads. You could either do a residency program now or after you finish your BSN, if you don't work through your BSN. OR you could get a job, work through your BSN, and then hopefully transfer to the ICU. I know several people that started working in a new grad residency program and started their RN-BSN (mostly online) at the same time. That's always an option too. Most RN-BSN programs don't have a clinical requirement if you are currently working as an RN.
  2. 1
    Quote from ScottE
    Most if not all RN-BSN programs have a clinical component of some kind.
    No, I don't think so. It's assumed that the clinical component has already been completed in the RN program. RN-BSN focuses on advanced assessment, leadership, theory, etc.
    Nurse_Diane likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from jhunting
    Thanks, everyone. Adding in the The time it takes to find a job as a new grad is a good point. UMass Amherst is the BSN program you go straight through taking classes in the summer, fall, winter, and spring. My ultimate goal is to become a CRNA (requiring at least 1 year in intensive care) and the programs at MassGen and Darthmouth-Hitchcock put you in an ICU for a year. I would really like the intensive training and I feel it would put me in a good position to get an ICU position for a year or two before I begin a CRNA program.
    I'm not familiar with Dartmouth-Hitchcock but am familiar with Mass General. Their ICU residency is new this year to staff a new ICU they are opening. Who knows if they will offer the program again next year? The new grad ICU program that was traditionally offered in previous years is very selective with very few. They even put the program on hold in recent years due to budget constraints. With the new grad employment situation being as bad as it is in Massachusetts right now, I wouldn't recommend holding out on applying in hopes of landing a position next year in a program with an uncertain future. Apply to every and any job when you graduate with your ADN. Don't miss out on any opportunity! If you find yourself still looking next winter when it comes time to apply for these new grad programs again, then go for it then!
    BrookeeLou_RN likes this.
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    Rn to BSN - is it worth it? I am taking a RN to BSN online program because I thought it was a job requirement - however this year the place I am working at is trying to save money because reports are showing that people are choosing to go hospitals that are cheaper - and those are the ones that use a lot of LPNs because they are cheaper than RNs. Our hospital is one of those that only hires BSN/RNs. They are closing some units permanently and farming out RN jobs in the areas that use the older nurses (who cost more for the hospital) to outside groups and instead, of course, increase the nurse to patient ratio.
    Last edit by 2yearrnba on May 30, '13 : Reason: clarify
  5. 0
    Just FYI, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing recently published a white paper advising all BSN programs to instill clinical hours into their curriculum. So if the program doesn't already have it... IT'S COMING!!!

    I strongly suggest that you have at least 6 months to a year of bedside experience before going into a RN-BSN program. This is coming from a former RN-BSN student and educator. The basis of most programs is to build your knowledge of evidence-based practice, health promotion and policy, and leadership. Many of your assignments will most likely challenge you to question current practice. If you haven't worked as a staff nurse, then you would only be able to draw on student experiences - which is often far from realistic nursing!
  6. 0
    what does 'clinical hours' entail? Many programs have practicums (practica?) where you have to log a certain number of hours in the community, often in conjunction with a Public Health nursing class. But as far as clinicals, like in nursing school, where you have to work shifts at a hospital as a student and practice your technical nursing skills, most RN-BSN programs don't require that, and I would be surprised if that was made a requirement.
  7. 0
    Here is the aforementioned paper:

    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/aacn-public...hite-Paper.pdf
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    Sadly, some Versant New Grad Programs will not take you with any hospital experience. Be sure to verify their parameters first. I was disqualified after my second interview for. New Grad Versant Program because I had a measley 3.5 months of experience. They blamed it on a Versant rule of requiring no experience. Strangely, I called Versant and they said hospitals could make any rules they wanted and it was not a Versant rule. Also, one would think they would have disqualified me from the get go, not after my second interview. So, be sure to check. It really sucked not being able to get a staff nurse position because I lacked experience, but also not being able to get a new grad position because I had too much experience. I am moving again, and hoping something will present itself.
    netglow likes this.
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    Quote from elprup
    Sadly, some Versant New Grad Programs will not take you with any hospital experience. Be sure to verify their parameters first. I was disqualified after my second interview for. New Grad Versant Program because I had a measley 3.5 months of experience. They blamed it on a Versant rule of requiring no experience. Strangely, I called Versant and they said hospitals could make any rules they wanted and it was not a Versant rule. Also, one would think they would have disqualified me from the get go, not after my second interview. So, be sure to check. It really sucked not being able to get a staff nurse position because I lacked experience, but also not being able to get a new grad position because I had too much experience. I am moving again, and hoping something will present itself.
    This is 100 percent correct.

    Remember, about half of all newly licensed nurses will not find a job as a nurse - that includes ADN/BSN/MSN (everybody). So be very careful in considering any additional education in nursing - until you gain employment as a nurse. After all, you want to bail out of nursing as fast as you can and put any additional education towards something outside of nursing, so you can be employable, as nursing is an extremely limiting degree. Rules like elprup has described are meant to destroy you and all the time and money you have spent. If you don't gain employment in 6 months - get another job!!!! you might still send out and inquire about nursing positions, but NEVER put all your eggs in that small basket!!! Make you job hunt then for nursing, in your free time when you come home from work.

    I'd advise not even working towards a BSN, unless you are hired as an RN, FIRST! That additional money you are debting yourself will add to your misery, and against your chances of another job.

    Remember just because you went to college in nursing doesn't mean you need to use that degree ever. Think about YOU first. Find something else more stable if you see an opportunity, if you find you are not getting interviews or offers for nursing!
    klone likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from elprup
    Sadly, some Versant New Grad Programs will not take you with any hospital experience. Be sure to verify their parameters first. I was disqualified after my second interview for. New Grad Versant Program because I had a measley 3.5 months of experience. They blamed it on a Versant rule of requiring no experience. Strangely, I called Versant and they said hospitals could make any rules they wanted and it was not a Versant rule. Also, one would think they would have disqualified me from the get go, not after my second interview. So, be sure to check. It really sucked not being able to get a staff nurse position because I lacked experience, but also not being able to get a new grad position because I had too much experience. I am moving again, and hoping something will present itself.
    Any idea of the thought process behind this policy? I'm very curious.


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