NY State may require nurses to obtain 4-year degrees - page 6

But some worry that an already severe shortage will become worse. New York is mulling over a requirement that would force all RNs to earn a bachelor's degree in order to keep their RN... Read More

  1. by   Energizer Bunny
    Don't you think that some of the nursing shortage comes from a lack of instructors? I know at my school there is a long, long waiting list and have heard that time and time again from others trying to get in to schools around the country.
  2. by   texan
    Certainly there is a shortage of instructors. Though recruiting instructors needs attention, it is not the front runner in the shortage.

    Quote from CNM2B
    Don't you think that some of the nursing shortage comes from a lack of instructors? I know at my school there is a long, long waiting list and have heard that time and time again from others trying to get in to schools around the country.
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    If they really want a BSN requirement, they should grandfather in anyone who is currently an ADN or diploma RN. THEN require NEW RNs to be BSNs.
    Well, as I've pointed out before, that would be a major problem in California. If people were required to obtain BSNs right away, TOTAL disaster.There are only 20 BSN programs in the state, and over 70 ADN programs.

    Whoah. Talk about a massive nursing shortage. We already have the lowest nurse per capita ratio in the nation. (If not the lowest, then I think we're 49th.)

    Not to mention, it would probably blow the hard won ratio law right out of the water. :uhoh21:

    I guess you could try to convert the ADN programs to BSNs but that would probably involve more instructors, money, etc. which the state, at least right now, doesn't have.

    The better solution would be requiring a BSN in X amount of years after the ADN. Just about all of the state universities have launched or are in the process of launching more affordable online ADN-BSN programs. That would probably be more feasible.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 25, '04
  4. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from LKRN
    Everyone is getting in such an uproar! Why not require a BSN as an entry level for RNs?
    Agree that a bachelor's requirement would be a good thing for the profession long-term.

    Need not necessarily be a BSN though.

    Docs, attorneys and others can have a variety of undergraduate degrees. Pre-med (pre-law) isn't a mandate.
  5. by   smk1
    i agree that all current rns should be grandfathered and just require future rns (those not currently enrolled in a nursing program) to be bsn, but to accomplish this all of the adn and diploma programs need to enter into co-op agreements with the state or private colleges for distance learning or telecourses so that bsn is feasible for everyone. example you would still go through part of the program through community college if you want but have the rest of the bsn coursework to finish up via telecourses or distance learning before graduation and nclex can occur. this way the community colleges still keep their biggest money making program and those who can't travel 100 miles to a BSN program can still become an RN (thus the shortage won't be greatly affected.) The instructor issue is still a problem though.
  6. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from smkoepke
    i agree that all current rns should be grandfathered and just require future rns (those not currently enrolled in a nursing program) to be bsn, but to accomplish this all of the adn and diploma programs need to enter into co-op agreements with the state or private colleges for distance learning or telecourses so that bsn is feasible for everyone. example you would still go through part of the program through community college if you want but have the rest of the bsn coursework to finish up via telecourses or distance learning before graduation and nclex can occur. this way the community colleges still keep their biggest money making program and those who can't travel 100 miles to a BSN program can still become an RN (thus the shortage won't be greatly affected.) The instructor issue is still a problem though.
    I also agree that the current RNs should be grandfathered as the diploma nurses were previously grandfathered in for the Associate's degree requirements. It makes sense. Many Associate's RNs would have a hardship in finishing BSN programs.
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on Apr 25, '04
  7. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    Mel you should be offended. I passed the same board as you and hold the same license. I have spoken to makny BSNs and looked into at least six. Yes here in NY the focus is not the bedside. It is mangaemant. I am offended at the fact I am expected to teach on the job, nursing tasks for the real world that many BSNs did not get in their programs. Yes you do your rotations, but I know for a fact the bedside aspect is not as intense as what an ASN gets. Mind you I can back up what I say. I am offended at the fact that you seem to think you have some form of superiority. My friend I will debate you on any aspect of nursing you care to come up with. Believe me I will not be underguned. Remember this, most of this job is learned after you pass the board.....
    Come on down Ya'll.
    I will not be OUTGUNNED by any BSN or MSN
    Staff Nursing is Staff Nursing

    But I do think it is awfully civil of you to be willing to grandfather this ole grandfather of an RN.. That really is so nice of you. It just warms my heart to know ya'll care.
  8. by   smk1
    Quote from teeituptom
    Come on down Ya'll.
    I will not be OUTGUNNED by any BSN or MSN
    Staff Nursing is Staff Nursing

    But I do think it is awfully civil of you to be willing to grandfather this ole grandfather of an RN.. That really is so nice of you. It just warms my heart to know ya'll care.

    i hope i haven't offended you! :imbar i just was thinking of the most practical thing that should be done if tptb decide on BSN for future entry. I just didn't think it fair or reasonalbe to require practicing nurses to go back to school.
  9. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from clickhere
    .


    [font='times new roman']the accelerated bsn program has to complete 128 credit hours to convey the bsn vs. 60-64 credit hours for adn. are you saying that these students took twice as many classes and learned less?




    i have 127 credit hours, all but ten are in nursing and nursing prereqs. i have been a nurse for 12 years. i am an adn.
    i took "twice as many classes", and am still an adn. what do you say i get "grandfathered" into being a bsn? :chuckle
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from lizz
    Uh ... my brother is an accountant. Handles the books for a multi-million dollar corporation. He doesn't even have his CPA.

    As far as respect, nurses just scored highest (as usual) in the annual Gallup poll measuring the public's perception of various professions. And nurses have scored high for several years. I believe the only profession that rated higher than nurses in recent years were firefighters during the post 9-11 tragedy. But, just this year, nurses were number one, once again.

    Generally, I agree that more education is better. But what KIND of education are we talking about here? You really think an ADN is the equivalent of some associate's degree in animal care? For crying out loud. It's not even close.

    I'd like to know how many animal care technicians could make it through an ADN program. Hell, I'd like to see how many of them could even make it through pre-reqs. :chuckle

    Talk about comparing apples and oranges. Once again, it's not always about titles. It's a little more complicated than that.

    I agree totally.
    Here is another spin on the question of "what kind of education"...

    I have been looking into university BSN programs. A few of my ADN classes will not transfer, because the universities have no equivalent. For example, my epidemiology class won't transfer because the BSN programs don't require it.

    What classes am I lacking for the BSN?

    College algebra, stats, and four semesters of U.S. gov't. I just don't know how I've been functioning as a nurse without these classes!

    I want to get a BSN, but I am discouraged that the required classes that I lack aren't anything that I feel will help me one bit as a nurse.

    I could see the extra classes required for a BSN being worth it, IF they were relevent to nursing!
  11. by   teeituptom
    Quote from smkoepke
    i hope i haven't offended you! :imbar i just was thinking of the most practical thing that should be done if tptb decide on BSN for future entry. I just didn't think it fair or reasonalbe to require practicing nurses to go back to school.
    I promise you, you didnt offend me. I dont think I can be offended anymore.

    these boards are here for

    exchanging ideas and thoughts

    sharing beliefs and views

    learning new ideas and thoughts

    but deep down these boards are for
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > for lots of fun
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I have been looking into university BSN programs. A few of my ADN classes will not transfer, because the universities have no equivalent. For example, my epidemiology class won't transfer because the BSN programs don't require it.

    What classes am I lacking for the BSN?

    College algebra, stats, and four semesters of U.S. gov't. I just don't know how I've been functioning as a nurse without these classes!

    I want to get a BSN, but I am discouraged that the required classes that I lack aren't anything that I feel will help me one bit as a nurse.

    I could see the extra classes required for a BSN being worth it, IF they were relevent to nursing!
    Yet another reason why this argument, in many cases, is absurd.

    But, we'll still probably argue about it anyway.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 28, '04
  13. by   straba
    Hooray New York!! :hatparty: I love NY

close