NY State may require nurses to obtain 4-year degrees - page 42

But some worry that an already severe shortage will become worse. New York is mulling over a requirement that would force all RNs to earn a bachelor's degree in order to keep their RN... Read More

  1. by   bkaymsn
    Nursing has proven in the past to be it's own worst enemy. Can you imagine what could be accomplished if all levels of nurses joined hands and hearts to serve not only the Science of Nursing but the Art of Nursing. Over the past 3o years I have practiced nursing at all levels. I became an LVN at 19,then an ADN fourteen years later ,followed by BSN and now a MSN. I plan on starting a PHD program in the next couple of months. My hope is that some how we as nurses can join together and become a postive force for our profession.
  2. by   burn out
    omg ... it's that old dead horse again... are we coding it this time? How many years are we going to beat this issue and still nothing changes. Until the entry level into nursing is deceided by nurses and not politicians and hospitals and insurance companies nothing is going to change, and since that is never going to happen let us just learn to accept the things we can not change and stop the code ...let the poor horse die.
  3. by   Gromit
    No, sorry, but this thread started because of what a state was attempting to do. While I don't presume to speak for you, I have NEVER been one to just sit quietly and let others (especially those who have no or very little concept of the profession I'm a part of) blindly dictate what will happen. No, I've never been able to keep too quiet about that. If in favor, I cheer. If not, I jeer. But regardles, my voice is heard. I see many others are just like me -not content to just lie down and keep quiet.
  4. by   bkaymsn
    I am new to this site but I really enjoy seeing Nurses at least dare to express an opion. Oklahoma has such a shortage that it isnot even a possibility.I still think that Nurses have the ability to determine the future of nursing however their is power in numbers and when divided it is lost.
  5. by   burn out
    For twenty years I have heard this debat and it is primarily the reason I got my BSN was because I was going to need it in the future. Every nurse has an opinion about this topic and it is influenced mostly by the degree they hold therefore leaving the profession itself devided. The profession either needs to come together on this thing or quit moaning about it. We pay to practice (or do our jobs), we support our states BON, we have PACS at legislative level and still nothing happens on this issue..other than we kill each other. How does that old saying go ..Give me the courage to change the things I can change and accept the things that I can not and the wisdom to know the difference.
    (Sorry for the spelling error , it is late and I amvery tired and can't sleep)
    Last edit by burn out on Jan 9, '07 : Reason: proofreading
  6. by   RN34TX
    Quote from burn out
    Every nurse has an opinion about this topic and it is influenced mostly by the degree they hold therefore leaving the profession itself devided.
    Or by the degree they plan on obtaining at some point.
    This is so very true and for me, it has been the biggest part of what has soured me on the idea.

    The whole idea just seems totally invalidated from my perspective (ADN RN) when the majority of supporters of this idea are already BSN or higher.

    Although I applaud and often sit in awe of nurses who go on to obtain advanced degrees, higher level of licensure, and/or simply work their way up through the ranks one way or another, it's the "Average Joe" staff nurse IMHO that this idea really needs to be sold on because it is these nurses, who make up the vast majority of nursing positions, that I believe really do know what's best for this profession.
  7. by   RNsRWe
    Thankfully this IS a dead issue for New York State. We don't have enough RNs employed now as it is, regardless of eductional level, and it's not getting better. It's getting worse, actually.

    While any hospital around here will "encourage" you to get a BSN if you don't have it (many look toward magnet status and dream), they'll snatch you up in a heartbeat if you have a valid RN license and are willing to work some shifts. An strong, regular pulse is a plus.
  8. by   linzz
    I am from Canada, here in Ontario, a BSN is now required for licensure. It is creating a huge shortage, yet many BSN graduates and can't find full time work. I do agree that increased education is a good thing but I also think that more education does not always make better nurses. I think that our govt is trying to fool the public into thinking that because nurses have a degree they will get better care but degrees don't help nursing shortages which are even made worse by BSN grads who don't intend to work at the bedside. I too am working on my BSN but that does not mean I agree with it, it's just that here in Canada, it's the minimum requirement. I don't think that our system could possibly be any more of a mess.
  9. by   Gromit
    Ugh. And y'all are in an entirely different category (mess wise) with the nationalized healthcare bit. The few Canadian nurses I know (who work contract over here for so many months each year) say the same thing -that the mess isn't any better across the border.
    Nightmarish.
    Well, as I've said before, I do intend to go back and get my BSN (and it won't end there, I'll climb higher) but the 'bedside care' won't be benefitting much from it -at least not directly. I'll be looking toward managerial positions, or positions outside of the hospital/bedside environment. After all, I don't want to be killing myself by doing bedside care forever.
  10. by   WinksRN
    Quote from smkoepke
    haven't they done this in some midwestern state? does anyone know how it has worked out? is the shortage more severe in that area? has pay gone up? job satisfaction? just wondering about this.....Also any canadians who have been working under the new BSN only statute what are your thoughts?

    America is looking less and less desireable..I wander bout Canada is that the new America?
  11. by   WinksRN
    Quote from Gromit
    Ugh. And y'all are in an entirely different category (mess wise) with the nationalized healthcare bit. The few Canadian nurses I know (who work contract over here for so many months each year) say the same thing -that the mess isn't any better across the border.
    Nightmarish.
    Well, as I've said before, I do intend to go back and get my BSN (and it won't end there, I'll climb higher) but the 'bedside care' won't be benefitting much from it -at least not directly. I'll be looking toward managerial positions, or positions outside of the hospital/bedside environment. After all, I don't want to be killing myself by doing bedside care forever.

    Maybe the Canadians are so spoiled they dont know they have a good thing, you nnkow how spoil kids act...I hope this were true i would be across the border in a jiffy cause America is trying to make us feel as needy as immigrants from 3rd world countries, not sayin canadian is 3rd world,it aint happenin with me.
  12. by   subee
    Quote from WinksRN
    Maybe the Canadians are so spoiled they dont know they have a good thing, you nnkow how spoil kids act...I hope this were true i would be across the border in a jiffy cause America is trying to make us feel as needy as immigrants from 3rd world countries, not sayin canadian is 3rd world,it aint happenin with me.
    Would you stay at the bedside if you had good working conditions. Plenty of BSN's work at bedside. The problems of nursing have nothing in Canada have nothing to do with requiring BSN but rather, poor working conditioins. The results of requiring BSN may not be seen for years - we have no idea what the long-term effects will be (I believe they will be favorable as we become a harder-to-find commodity). However, even though I believe BSN should be minimum, ADN should stay as a stepping-stone degree for people who can't afford, or are not ready to commit to a four year program. AND, as a stepping-stone interim degree, that program would seam into BSN with on-line courses and clinicals arranged at the student's convenience. 10 years was a perfectly reasonable time to obtain another 60 credits (SIX credits every 12 months is so difficult?). Make the job attractive and the people will come. But until nurses get acquainted with the political process
    and make change happen, we will continue to whine and deflect when the problem is really US more than THEM.
  13. by   Gromit
    Oh I'd NEVER claim the Canadian nurses are spoiled -far from it. I've heard enough horror-stories from 'em to know better than that. But with only one exception (and even that one later recanted) they have told me that we are nuts if we go over to their style of healthcare. Personally, I agree. The more 'the people' perceive something as 'free' (which lets face it, most of the folks who are on the government dole perceive it as a 'freebie' -regardless of the fact that only higher taxes by those of us who work our tails off are paying for it -the government does NOT earn money, it taxes it from those who do -make no mistake about that. Its not politics, its fact. ) the more they will take advantage of, and abuse the system.
    I'm told that not all of Canada works the same way (they evidently have different rules for different districts, but I confess that I really don't understand all of that) but the nurses that I know, that work in the US for several months out of the year, tell me that their (Canadian) facilities shut down after they reach the end of their budget, so the (out of work at that point) nurses come here to continue working, then go back when the new budget year begins (and their facilities open back up). I can't speak for others, but to me, this sounds nightmarish.

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