New program, but still seeking accreditation?

  1. 0
    The local community college where I live just expanded their programs to offer a RN to BSN transition. My question is since this is a new program it has not received accreditation yet. If I get a BSN from them what implication could that have in the long run? I have a year left on my husbands GI Bill and if I take a program where I take at least one class on campus I can receive the housing allowance so that would really help a lot.

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  2. 11 Comments...

  3. 0
    You run the risk of having a degree from a non-accredited program. While this may not have too many implications in the workplace, you will definitely have issues if you decide to go on for a masters degree. You should find out where the program is in the accreditation process.
  4. 0
    I would avoid anyplace that doesn't have accreditation. It might really hurt your employability (I don't know this fur sure). It would definitely put you below other applicants with similar experience. If you have your RN check out Excelsior or other online school. Any new school is going to have growing pains. I would stick with a school with a track record.
  5. 0
    Yes go for accreditation.
  6. 0
    Thanks everyone! Is there anyone that knows how long the process takes? I want to say the program has been going for two or 3 semesters now. Their ADN program has been in existence for years and years, but the bridge program has just gotten started. I am looking at a few other places. This would just be the most convenient. I agree though, it just seems to risky if they haven't completed the process.
  7. 0
    I'm not sure, but I believe they have to graduate some classes. And they look at the student graduation pass/fail/dropout rates and the Board pass/fail rates too. I think that's the way it works, so accreditation is never an assured thing.

    Be reeeeaaallly careful.
  8. 1
    The accreditation process takes at least a couple years, and accreditation is retroactive to when the school formally started the process. If the school is an active candidate for accreditation while you are attending and ends up getting accredited, you will be a graduate of an accredited program, even if you graduated before the school was formally accredited.

    Is the school's ADN program NLNAC accredited? If the ADN program is accredited and has been for some time, and if the new program is going to be in the process of pursuing accreditation while you're attending (actively in the process, not just saying they're going to apply), I would consider that a pretty minimal risk for you (chances are v. good the new program is going to get accredited). Otherwise, I'd look for another option.
    Meriwhen likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    The accreditation process takes at least a couple years, and accreditation is retroactive to when the school formally started the process. If the school is an active candidate for accreditation while you are attending and ends up getting accredited, you will be a graduate of an accredited program, even if you graduated before the school was formally accredited.

    Is the school's ADN program NLNAC accredited? If the ADN program is accredited and has been for some time, and if the new program is going to be in the process of pursuing accreditation while you're attending (actively in the process, not just saying they're going to apply), I would consider that a pretty minimal risk for you (chances are v. good the new program is going to get accredited). Otherwise, I'd look for another option.
    Elkpark speaks the truth. I was in the exact same situation in my first RN-BSN program, and this was the exact same answer that CCNE gave me when I wrote to ask about accreditation. The program did have a long-standing fully-accredited diploma program, so I was confident that their BSN programs would also be accredited. If they already hadn't had a proven track record, I would have not applied.

    I'm not saying definitely do it--after all, there is always a risk that they may not get accreditation and then you'd be stuck--but do consider these factors in your final decision.

    For the record, it's my first RN-BSN program not because of any fault of the program: they were a brick-and-mortar program but I had to move out-of-state, so I couldn't complete it They did get their accreditation with minimal problem so had I been able to stay and finish, all would have been well.
  10. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    The accreditation process takes at least a couple years, and accreditation is retroactive to when the school formally started the process. If the school is an active candidate for accreditation while you are attending and ends up getting accredited, you will be a graduate of an accredited program, even if you graduated before the school was formally accredited.

    .
    NLNAC accreditation is retroactive to the date of the site visit. If you graduate prior to the site visit, your degree will be unaccredited.

    "However, please note that accreditation is effective as of the accreditation cycle in which the visit took place and is not retroactive."

    http://www.nlnac.org/resources/AboutAccreditation_2010-JanFeb.pdf
  11. 0
    Quote from kabfighter
    NLNAC accreditation is retroactive to the date of the site visit. If you graduate prior to the site visit, your degree will be unaccredited.

    "However, please note that accreditation is effective as of the accreditation cycle in which the visit took place and is not retroactive."

    http://www.nlnac.org/resources/AboutAccreditation_2010-JanFeb.pdf
    Thank you for the clarification.


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