This may sound silly, BUT what is the difference between ASN & ADN?

  1. 0
    this may sound silly, but what is the difference between asn & adn? :wink2:

    when i registered they didn't have the option of choosing adn. i am going to start some online classes for my bsn, i don't know it will help me in the long run, but personally, i would feel better it i had it. it will be another accomplishment for me.:mortarboard:
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    Usually it's just a difference in preferred terminology. While there are a few schools out there that do award a degree known as the Associate Degree in Nursing, usually ADN is a general term for a nursing degree that may actually be an Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, or even an Associate of Arts.

    Some schools offer multiple associate degrees in nursing. Mine offers an Associate of Applied Science and an Associate of Science. Students with more elective credits in the arts and sciences go with the AS, while students who have credits in allied health or other applied professional fields may fit better into the AAS plan. In the end, the nursing courses are the same for us and we frequently refer to each other as all being "in the ADN program."

    Does that make sense?
    Lisa_RN likes this.
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    Quote from EricEnfermero
    Usually it's just a difference in preferred terminology. While there are a few schools out there that do award a degree known as the Associate Degree in Nursing, usually ADN is a general term for a nursing degree that may actually be an Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, or even an Associate of Arts.

    Some schools offer multiple associate degrees in nursing. Mine offers an Associate of Applied Science and an Associate of Science. Students with more elective credits in the arts and sciences go with the AS, while students who have credits in allied health or other applied professional fields may fit better into the AAS plan. In the end, the nursing courses are the same for us and we frequently refer to each other as all being "in the ADN program."

    Does that make sense?

    Yes it does! thanks!


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