level of difficulty 2nd degree BSN program vs ADN

  1. I am accepted to both, I do have intentions of getting masters at at some point, or CRNA. I do obviously holg a BS in biology, and some graduate courses in the sciences. Knowing most masters programs in nursing require at least 3.0 gpa, does anyone know how much more difficult a 12 month 2nd degree BSN program is vs a 23 month ADN program which the pace is slower due to greater time period. In other words has or does anyone know how hard it would be to get at least 3.0 in 2nd degree program which lasts only 12 months?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    They both are pretty equally difficult as they both gear themselves to the same end.........NCLEX RN.

    What makes the 2nd degree BSN program more difficult is the fact that it's at an accellerated pace and you finish in one year. But this pace would be you used to the pace you'll find in CRNA school.

    It is definately possible to get a 3.0 in an accellerated program.

    My advice to you is to bite the bullet and do the accellerated program and get done in one year. Becoming a CRNA requires nursing experience and ICU experience, so you're going to need a couple of year on the floor before applying to those programs.

    If you go the ADN route, that takes 2 years. Then another year or two (depending on the pace and the program) to complete your ADN to RN because CRNA and Masters programs require a BSN. So you're looking at 4 years of school to get the BSN rather than the one, although you could be working as an RN while you get your ADN to BSN completion. This might be the easier softer way and allow for better grades, but the time factor would slow you down.
  4. by   areafl
    just wanted to clarify.. when you graduate with you ADN you are ready to get your RN.. guessing it was just a typo.. you will have to earn you BSN after you get your ADN. However, I do think some schools offer the ADN to your masters. (still if you already have BS doing your BSN is a better choice) when doing the ADN program you first become an LPN. (that is one year, then you have to take boards. Then another year for you RN. I guess the choice is yours. good luck
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from areafl
    just wanted to clarify.. when you graduate with you ADN you are ready to get your RN.. guessing it was just a typo.. you will have to earn you BSN after you get your ADN. However, I do think some schools offer the ADN to your masters. (still if you already have BS doing your BSN is a better choice) when doing the ADN program you first become an LPN. (that is one year, then you have to take boards. Then another year for you RN. I guess the choice is yours. good luck
    Not all schools work this way. Many (most?) ADN programs are NOT set up for students to take NCLEX-PN after the first year. Even if the school is set up this way, it is just an option, you do not have to take LPN boards.
  6. by   areafl
    I was unaware of this... We had to take and pass the PN boards in order to continue with the program.
  7. by   jjjoy
    Regardless of whether it's an accelerated program or not, you'll probably find the difficulty of nursing school to be different than the difficulty of previous coursework you've taken. There's lots of memorization and a TON of material to cover. Take a look at some of the nursing textbooks! Homework is review, review, review as opposed to comprehension questions or problems to solve or the like. Tests are usually multiple choice and mimic the style of the NCLEX which you take after completing nursing school to get your license. In bio classes, I studied until I understood. In nursing, I studied what I thought would be covered on exams.

    All things being equal, I'd definitely say just go with the accelerated program. It's the shortest investment of time and it sets you ahead educationally. I also think that academically, you'll be just fine if you're going to be doing this full time and don't have several other responsibilities to juggle while studying.

    However, more important, I think, than accelerated BSN vs. ADN is the specifics of the programs available and your own strengths and goals. Some programs only provide the minimum number of clinical hours with 8-10 students sharing one instructor on site. Other programs have more clinical hours and/or externship programs that can boost one's clinical confidence coming out of nursing school and starting working. Many new grads these days are having a hard time transitioning to "the real world" because their student experience in clinicals didn't come close to all that practicing nurses are responsible for - at least not in most acute care hospital settings.

    Now that accelerated BSN programs have been going a few years, I'd love to hear how graduates of those programs are doing and what they're doing. Do you have info on that?
  8. by   WolfpackRed
    I also must add that another factor to conside is the time commitment that the accelerated program will take. Even though it is one year long, you, and your loved ones, should be prepared for this. As you may be squeezing 24 months of class into a 12 month period, with clinicals, papers and other last minute requirements that the school pulls out on you there may be little to no time for outside pursuits such as work or relationships. I see in your profile that you are older and work in pharm sales, so I would assume certain aspects about you\, but I could be very wrong.

    This is just my observation on the students in the acelerated program at our school of nursing. I have no experience with an accelerated program, so you may want to speak to someone who has.

    Either way you choose, congrats on your acceptance.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from areafl
    I was unaware of this... We had to take and pass the PN boards in order to continue with the program.
    It's optional here. Most people are too busy studying their courses to worry about NCLEX-PN and don't choose that option.

    The school I went to in NC, we could become CNA's, but NCLEX-PN was not an option.
  10. by   Dino
    "Now that accelerated BSN programs have been going a few years, I'd love to hear how graduates of those programs are doing and what they're doing. Do you have info on that? "


    I really am not sure about how graduates from these accelerated programs are doing nor how their performance was while in school. My guess might be that it would take a little while to adjust since only 12 months ago they did not know anything about nursing.
    I am just hoping that it is not too difficult to get at least a 3.0 in an accelerated program, because for myself knowing I want MSN or CRNA, getting less than 3.0 would mean I would have a very difficult time getting into either program.
  11. by   jjjoy
    Try to find out more about the specifics of the programs you've been accepted to. Some schools function in a similar manner to grad school where a "B" is considered passing and a "C" is considered unsatisfactory. In that case, graduating the program in good standing MEANS having maintained a 3.0 average.

    Think of yourself as well. What kind of environment motivates you? In an accelerated program, your classmates are more likely to have a similar background to yourself - a college degree, plans to go on for higher education, etc. In an ADN program, your classmates would probably be more diverse, some recently out of high school, some older career changers, some may have worked as nursing assistants already. In an accelerated program, everyone is likely to be putting the bulk of their energies into the program. In an ADN program, there'd likely be more students who have to divide their energies more between school, work and family.
  12. by   buddhak0n
    Quote from Tweety
    They both are pretty equally difficult as they both gear themselves to the same end.........NCLEX RN.

    What makes the 2nd degree BSN program more difficult is the fact that it's at an accellerated pace and you finish in one year. But this pace would be you used to the pace you'll find in CRNA school.

    It is definately possible to get a 3.0 in an accellerated program.

    My advice to you is to bite the bullet and do the accellerated program and get done in one year. Becoming a CRNA requires nursing experience and ICU experience, so you're going to need a couple of year on the floor before applying to those programs.

    If you go the ADN route, that takes 2 years. Then another year or two (depending on the pace and the program) to complete your ADN to RN because CRNA and Masters programs require a BSN. So you're looking at 4 years of school to get the BSN rather than the one, although you could be working as an RN while you get your ADN to BSN completion. This might be the easier softer way and allow for better grades, but the time factor would slow you down.
    OK great... I'd love to do it in a SINGLE year and I'd expect it to be highly intellectually challenging...

    I Live in 08260 and don't intend to drive 2 hours each way each day to do it at Jefferson or the U Of Penn...

    What do I do ? LOL... Seriously the only program I've found around here is Stockton and I don't even think they HAVE a Second Degree BSN let alone an ACCELERATED BSN...

    Sorry but I guess the only way I'd ever get this done will be to go spend thousands of dollars (Again) without any guarantee or inkling that it will result in dollar one of income... sorry without a job offer I wouldn't even waste my time..

    Nursing Shortage? Yeah so they say but everytime I walk by a nursing station I can't rightly say that I see any dramatic shortage of people hanging around.. sorry I know that's probably not fair but my wife has been in health care for years and years and years... and I've been around and some of it is TRUE and some of it is " FICTION" <g>
  13. by   mstigerlily
    If you already have a BS and graduate courses in sciences, an ADN would be simple for you. I'd do a direct entry MSN program if I were you, or at least teh BSN.

    I found the big difference between BSN/ADN classes was the BSN had a lot more about nursing theory, nursing research, and a lot more reading of both of those things and also paper writing. I was surprised at how few papers we wrote in the ADN program and when we did they had little seminars and study guides for us, as if writing an academic college level paper woudl be something new or challenging for us. In the BSN program, they seemed to take for granted we already knew how to do this.

    Quote from Dino
    I am accepted to both, I do have intentions of getting masters at at some point, or CRNA. I do obviously holg a BS in biology, and some graduate courses in the sciences. Knowing most masters programs in nursing require at least 3.0 gpa, does anyone know how much more difficult a 12 month 2nd degree BSN program is vs a 23 month ADN program which the pace is slower due to greater time period. In other words has or does anyone know how hard it would be to get at least 3.0 in 2nd degree program which lasts only 12 months?
  14. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from buddhak0n

    Nursing Shortage? Yeah so they say but everytime I walk by a nursing station I can't rightly say that I see any dramatic shortage of people hanging around.. sorry I know that's probably not fair but my wife has been in health care for years and years and years... and I've been around and some of it is TRUE and some of it is " FICTION" <g>
    Let me see if I understand this.

    Based on your casual observation as a non-nurse walking past a nurses' station, you see several people and deduce that there is no nursing shortage. Do you know for a fact that all of those people were nurses? As in "real nurses" (LPNs/RNs)? For all you know, they could have been housekeeping staff, Bio-Med, UCs, aides, heck, any old Tom, Dick or Harry these days for that matter. Just because there are a lot of people at a nurses' station does not=good staffing.

    Your wife has "years and years and years in health care." In what capacity? As a nurse? Because if she's not a nurse, again, neither of you can really speak to staffing issues of nurses since neither of you would know what nurses need.

    I noticed the <g> at the end of your post. I suppose that was to indicate that what you wrote was intended to be somewhat humorous. Please know that for those of us who really are nurses, understaffing is not a laughing matter, something you will become painfully aware of should you become a nurse yourself.

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