Is it worth getting your BSN right out of ADN school? - page 3

Hi all, I'm a recently graduated RN with a ADN. I'm having a tough time finding a job (passed nclex in july) and wanted to know if you think it's worth it to go back for the BSN transition so... Read More

  1. Visit  future_anesthetist profile page
    0
    Quote from subee
    How about in depth training in one area? How about definining a problem area on the unit and designing an alternate approach to what they are presently doing? How about spending a short rotation with an infection control nurse, radiation nurse, quality control nurse? How about a semester of public health - we don't require that anymore? Clinical education shouldn't end with an ADN. A previous poster stated that a 3 page paper was required to meet the class requirements. Really?
    It looks like from your account page that you have 38 years of experience. First of all wow that's amazing! But I wonder if the programs have been changing because my ADN was the most rigorous thing I have ever done...and the same for most people who graduated from my program. I was going to go to a well-respected private university but when I got my first bill it was $16,000 for one semester. That would have been $96,000 total for a BSN. I was 18 years old and simply did not have the resources to complete that program. Boy was I glad I didn't. The program would've been two years with a bachelors degree but less prerequisite than my ADN. Now how is that possible that a bachelors degree in two years or an ADN in 2 years is the same? My clinical hours consisted of everything that you had listed plus much more. I had a total of 900+ clinical hours total with exposure to every area of the hospital. The BSN students had about 750. We had rotations and multiple different departments, things that the BSN students could only dream of. Also, most hiring managers at my hospital would hire an ADN grad from my college over a BSN grad from this college any day simply because the amount of exposure and clinical experience we are given in school. And the papers we had to write were insane. I wrote 20 page papers weekly in one semester and that was just simply an expectation for my ADN. I'm sure I could go on but I'm guessing that you are seeing a point here. So now I have my ADN but I just need that BSN after my name. When the students at the other college already have their BSN with what? a few extra liberal arts classes? I'm sorry but I simply don't see how that's "better." But! My total program with ADN and RN-BSN will cost $12,000 but will have taken 6 years when I'm done in August next year. Needless to say, I wouldn't trade my ADN for anything!!!
    Last edit by future_anesthetist on Nov 20, '13
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  3. Visit  Lennonninja profile page
    0
    Quote from subee
    How about in depth training in one area? How about definining a problem area on the unit and designing an alternate approach to what they are presently doing? How about spending a short rotation with an infection control nurse, radiation nurse, quality control nurse? How about a semester of public health - we don't require that anymore? Clinical education shouldn't end with an ADN. A previous poster stated that a 3 page paper was required to meet the class requirements. Really?
    My capstone project is to find a clinical problem to work on (infection control, decreasing vaps/cautis/clabsis, delirium, sedation vacations, etc), find research about it, analyze it, and write a proposal for my unit on making a change to policies at work. So far I'm currently writing page 17 of this paper.

    The one 3 page paper I mentioned before, that's probably the shortest paper I've had to write in this program. Last semester in a genetics class I wrote a 13 page paper about a genetic disease. We have exams too, but mostly this program has been about papers and applying what we have seen in our real life nursing practice to these bridge to BSN courses.
    Last edit by Lennonninja on Nov 20, '13
  4. Visit  Nola009 profile page
    0
    Soooooo..... You all are in favor of going for the BSN immediately following the ADN, I take it. Lol,lol. Like many of you I wished I was in a position for my 1st degree to be the BSN, not the ADN. I wonder, since there is no real nursing shortage, just more of a fear of a nursing shortage, if the reason the ADN programs continue to be available so long post WW2 era when they were originated out of necessity as a means to let some of us see if we are really "cut out" for the job. Which is a very emotionally, mentally, and physically difficult one. One of the hospitals I was applying at stated that it's an emotionally "taxing" positon. Oh, geez.
  5. Visit  Nola009 profile page
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    And since I know I have some nice and knowledgable people on this thread: Would you recommend taking a job in an Assisted Living Facility where I "wouldn't be using my RN skills" or wait for something better ? I graduated in May and passed the NCLEX in July. Ty for any guidance
  6. Visit  besaangel profile page
    0
    If you cannot reserve an RN position, then yes, I'd encourage you to take a job that could possibly help you get your foot in the door. A job that pays is better than no paycheck at all. Ya never know.
  7. Visit  future_anesthetist profile page
    1
    Quote from Nola009
    And since I know I have some nice and knowledgable people on this thread: Would you recommend taking a job in an Assisted Living Facility where I "wouldn't be using my RN skills" or wait for something better ? I graduated in May and passed the NCLEX in July. Ty for any guidance
    Absolutely get any nursing position you can get. After one year goes by and you have not had one RN job, you will be basically useless to potential employers. There is constantly new grads being produced. I've heard this advice from a previous instructor who was a RN manager for years. But, protect your license if you are in a facility that stretches it's staff thin, just be careful legally speaking. And yes, you will use your nursing skills. More so than any non nursing job
    Nola009 likes this.
  8. Visit  Nola009 profile page
    0
    Quote from future_anesthetist
    Absolutely get any nursing position you can get. After one year goes by and you have not had one RN job, you will be basically useless to potential employers. There is constantly new grads being produced. I've heard this advice from a previous instructor who was a RN manager for years. But, protect your license if you are in a facility that stretches it's staff thin, just be careful legally speaking. And yes, you will use your nursing skills. More so than any non nursing job
    Thanks all. I will I am just so darn nervous that the orientation will be insufficient, the staff will not be good, and/or the patient load will be atrocious. Just feel like I'm walking into a lion's den
  9. Visit  CaraMarshall profile page
    1
    Hi I just moved to Houston from Hawaii in August. I graduated with my ADN in May and passed the NCLEX in July in Hawaii. I transferred my RN license to Texas and have been searching for RN jobs. I have had 2 interviews and one later today. I am getting so frustrated, I'm wondering if it is better to get my BSN now or wait? And what are some accredited BSN programs that I should be looking into? Thanks
    Cara
    Nola009 likes this.
  10. Visit  CaraMarshall profile page
    1
    Oh and I have been working as a Caregiver since Sept 6th, working 6 days a week. I'm thinking of trying to get a CNA job just to get my foot in the door somewhere.
    Nola009 likes this.
  11. Visit  besaangel profile page
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    The CNA is a good idea. keep trying


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