I need a BSN or higher to work in Critical Care or ER or any hospital area!?

  1. 0
    My apsirations as a nurse are to work in the hospital settings...I'm not sure whether I want to eventually stay in ER, ICU, PICU, MED SURG, or whatever yet I just know I want to work in those challnging settings in the hospital...
    I was reading on a few websites [I think eHow] and it said that I needed a BSN...or advanced certificate to ever work in Critical care? Now I DO plan to get my BSN and MSN eventually...but right now I'm going into LPN and then doing ADN and I surely want Critical Care experience before I get my BSN or work in the hospital!?
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    GET YOUR BSN
    don't waste time...
  4. 0
    Hospitals are now in the trend of hiring BSNs as the minimum and to be honest I would recommend you to go straight for your BSN. I am an ADN graduate nurse and I totally support ADNs and honestly think they come out as stronger nurses than BSN nurses because we are focused on the clinical aspect of nursing rather than management. Hospitals are very competitive and since you want to go straight into a specialty area you definately want to have a BSN as your minimum qualification. Also, volunteer at hospitals or get your foot in the door or working as a nursing aide because i bet pretty soon all hospitals will start to make BSN are their minimum requirement. St. Jude and UCI are hiring BSN and no more ADNs. Just a piece of advice, it's also who you know when it comes to getting a job. So start networking now and save yourself the time from doing LVN to ADN to BSN. Go straight for your BSN!!!! Good luck
  5. 1
    Our new hires (level one ICU) are split evenly between RN/BSN. The only difference I see is that the new BSNs have more debt than the youngsters that did the diploma programs.Most of the BSN grads seem to move on pretty quickly, the ADN/Diploma RNs seem to spend a longer time working at the bedside. A LOT of the ADN/Diploma RNs end up getting a BSN, but they (like me) let the hospital pay for it.
    Skylarslaughter likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from telenurse212
    Hospitals are now in the trend of hiring BSNs as the minimum and to be honest I would recommend you to go straight for your BSN. I am an ADN graduate nurse and I totally support ADNs and honestly think they come out as stronger nurses than BSN nurses because we are focused on the clinical aspect of nursing rather than management. Hospitals are very competitive and since you want to go straight into a specialty area you definately want to have a BSN as your minimum qualification. Also, volunteer at hospitals or get your foot in the door or working as a nursing aide because i bet pretty soon all hospitals will start to make BSN are their minimum requirement. St. Jude and UCI are hiring BSN and no more ADNs. Just a piece of advice, it's also who you know when it comes to getting a job. So start networking now and save yourself the time from doing LVN to ADN to BSN. Go straight for your BSN!!!! Good luck

    I totally understand that it's just my community college ONLY offers ADN and there's no other college in the area...and being that the waiting list takes years I'm doing my LPN while taking ADN pre reqs... So I'm lost as to how to go straight for my BSN as of this moment even though it's my goal to get my BSN...I'm thinking I won't be able to do BSN until a move to a different state which my family is planning upon my graduation. Perhaps since there's not many people with BSNs in my area it might be a bit easier to get hospital experience here before I move and get my BSN?
  7. 0
    Quote from LostButMakinGoodTime
    Our new hires (level one ICU) are split evenly between RN/BSN. The only difference I see is that the new BSNs have more debt than the youngsters that did the diploma programs.Most of the BSN grads seem to move on pretty quickly, the ADN/Diploma RNs seem to spend a longer time working at the bedside. A LOT of the ADN/Diploma RNs end up getting a BSN, but they (like me) let the hospital pay for it.
    That's what I'm hoping. I think it really depends on the area people are from and whether they have a lot of BSN graduates in the area. Here, there's only one community college that offers CNA, LPN, and ADN. I'm doing LPN first with ADN pre reqs classes so I get bridge right into the ADN program and get experience and all that, I'm sure that will make it easier on my career once I have my BSN and some experience.

    What about LPNs working in the hospital while in school for their ADN? Do you know many of those and what do you think the prospects are?
  8. 0
    Go straight for your BSN. I too am a ADN and now at 47 with four kids, I am stuggling with going back. No time for me. only working and taking care of the kids. Go now for it! you will never regret it!
  9. 0
    Quote from Brightonrn1
    Go straight for your BSN. I too am a ADN and now at 47 with four kids, I am stuggling with going back. No time for me. only working and taking care of the kids. Go now for it! you will never regret it!
    Thanks for your advice! I'm def. getting my BSN, just going the ADN route first because where I live there's no BSN programs in the area!
  10. 0
    Quote from LostButMakinGoodTime
    Our new hires (level one ICU) are split evenly between RN/BSN. The only difference I see is that the new BSNs have more debt than the youngsters that did the diploma programs.Most of the BSN grads seem to move on pretty quickly, the ADN/Diploma RNs seem to spend a longer time working at the bedside. A LOT of the ADN/Diploma RNs end up getting a BSN, but they (like me) let the hospital pay for it.
    Yeah I'm thinking of just getting my BSN online, for the 'education status' but not because I want any managment position...I'm only interested in travel nursing within the hospital category [ICU, ER, etc] (:


Top