higher pay for BSN grads? - page 7

Quick poll here... Does your hospital pay BSN nurses more? If yes, how much? If no, what are your thoughts on this? On a side note: Does Magnet status tie into BSN nurses?... Read More

  1. by   ZASHAGALKA
    It comes down to 'differentiation of practice'. Differentiating based solely on education is just silly and has proven for 40 yrs to be an unworkable model. There is so much more that goes into making a nurse.

    But, in the real world, we 'differentiate' on a variety of reasons: experience, relative scarcity of specialty, certs, leadership, etc.

    Education should rightly be ONE of those differentiations, just not the sole one.

    But, just like my EXPERIENCE grants me a rightly deserved premium, so should education.

    In reality, we DON'T all do the same work for the same pay. Nor, should we. Our work environments depend upon a variety of skill sets. And the higher that skill set, the more it should be promoted. The sure way to do that is the bottom line.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 4, '06
  2. by   banditrn
    Years ago when I started at the hospital, I started with a BSN grad. She admitted she had less clinical time than I had, and was less familiar with the day to day procedures. It doesn't take much time to catch up, tho.

    I never felt the desire for a BSN - I'd done many things during my life, and knew that management was not for me.

    In that same hospital, tho, to advance took a BSN. I would encourage younger people to try for it.
  3. by   Tweety
    Quote from banditrn
    Years ago when I started at the hospital, I started with a BSN grad. She admitted she had less clinical time than I had, and was less familiar with the day to day procedures. It doesn't take much time to catch up, tho..

    I think that was true about BSN programs, but the last 10 or so years they've heard the criticisms and have increased their clinical time. It's about equal in most cases to ADNs programs.

    But you're right, it wasn't always true.

    Even though there are still some who without knowing what they are talking about say "ADNs get more clinical experience". It definately isn't true with the programs here, in fact they are exactly equal.
  4. by   kepschafer
    G'Day!

    Just wondering what the starting wages are for RN's with BSN in the US. I am aware that different states pay different amounts.

    In Australia the 6 states and 2 territories all pay different amounts but the average for a first year out with a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) is about AU$40000, which is about US$30000 a year or about AU$19 per hour, about US$14 per hour.

    There is no diploma entry into nursing in Australia. To become a RN you must complete a BN.

    Thanks for your help with my interest.

    Keppel :mortarboard:
  5. by   crazylilkelly
    my hospital only gives a $1,300 bonus for new bsn grads. other than that, everything else is the same. however, there are roles in the hospital that require a bsn, those tend to pay more. but jobs worked by bsn or adns pay the same.
  6. by   psychonaut
    I actually calculated out the clinical hours for both the bsn and adn programs in my locale for a 1st semester presentation on "Nursing as a Profession". I was surprised to see that they were actually just about equal in time (bsn>adn by 30min).

    I should note that my position was a bit contrary, given the blatant anti-adn attitude of our source text. Having been reading allnurses for a couple of years prior to beginning the program has prepared me in ways not expected by my instructors. I argued for mutual respect, of course, and advised my fellow students to appreciate the knowledge and experience of all the nurses we would be working with.

    Quote from Tweety
    I think that was true about BSN programs, but the last 10 or so years they've heard the criticisms and have increased their clinical time. It's about equal in most cases to ADNs programs.

    But you're right, it wasn't always true.

    Even though there are still some who without knowing what they are talking about say "ADNs get more clinical experience". It definately isn't true with the programs here, in fact they are exactly equal.
  7. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I'm an ADN RN, and I think BSNs should be paid more, but they usually aren't, in my experience. I've worked with BSNs who not only have more education than me, but more experience, as well. Still, I made more $$ than they did. I don't know why.

    My mil is a PhD RN, and I'm an ADN RN. However, I make $21./per hr more than she does. I do direct pt care and charge. She's a researcher and a college professor.
    No way is this fair, but that's reality.
  8. by   jadegypsy
    My facility offers a "career ladder" which offers bonus pay per hour for participating. The higher the degree the higher the bonus pay. Since we all do exactly the same job, work the same hours, have the same skills and provide the same care, this seems unfair to me. I think sometimes that the BSN is better at writing the B>S> into their career ladder proposals, so maybe thats why they rate the higher pay. Start pay for nurses used to be the same, but I haven't heard if that still holds true. We are "forbidden" to discuss pay rates among ourselves.
  9. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from jadegypsy
    Since we all do exactly the same job, work the same hours, have the same skills and provide the same care, this seems unfair to me.
    This is just untrue. We don't all have the same skills, and we shouldn't all get the same pay.

    I've been an RN for 13 yrs. I make MUCH more than a new grad - and I deserve it. My skill set simply far surpasses 'minimum entry'.

    We pay different people to do the same jobs in most every profession across the board, depending upon skill set. And however you gain those extra skills, be it through experience or education: it deserves to be rewarded.

    If I walked into a job and they offered me starting out of school RN salary: I'd laugh in their face. BSNs should do the same when offered ADN salary for commensurate experience.

    IF BSNs did just that, there wouldn't be an ADN/BSN debate. With a real incentive to do so, the education mix would rapidly begin to change. But, that would benefit ADNs as well. As those ADNs 'capped' out their salaries, as most of us eventually do, it would provide an avenue to 'break the cap'.

    More pay for education would be a win-win for all nurses. I've said this many times on this board: you want me to go get a BSN - then give me a real reason to do so.

    ~faith,
    Timothy, ADN.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Dec 22, '06
  10. by   elizabeth321
    Pay should be based on EXPERIENCE plus education...there is no way someone with no life or nursing experience and their BSCN should make anywhere near the money I make after 20 plus years of experience...nor should they get all the monday to friday jobs....I am only a few courses away from my degree...it is a personal goal and unfortunately one of the hoops we have to jump through to get some of the better jobs here...though I am doing fine at the moment....but want to work another 20 years...so want to keep my options open. I am unimpressed with new grads who come out of university with their degree and no other experience...they are for the most part less than adequate nurses.....as long as they know they still have alot to learn they usually manage to do ok with some experience....the others not so good.

    Liz
  11. by   reroute
    My wife works as an RN at a local hospital and gets a whopping 25 cents more an hour for her BSN than she did with her ADN. Not much incentive for someone who wishes only to remain at the staff nurse level to get their BSN. It seems to benefit only if you want to go into managerial or pursue a higher degree and licensure. As far as experience and pay level, I have always started out at the highest pay level for any facility I've worked at in the last 20 years. Even starting as a new grad 23 yrs ago I had an advantage due to a big background as a medic first. I believe they are doing good locally in that aspect. Too bad about the BSN incentive. Most prospective RN students I have talked to are going for their ADN's due to the fact that they have less school time and are aware of the mostly equal pay for the ADN level.

    Nursing an educational headache.
  12. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from elizabeth321
    I am unimpressed with new grads who come out of university with their degree and no other experience...they are for the most part less than adequate nurses.....as long as they know they still have alot to learn they usually manage to do ok with some experience....the others not so good.
    Unimpressed? Well new grads really aren't there to impress anyone, they're there to learn and start their nursing careers. Less than adequate nurses? Well of course, they have never been a nurse before. We just learn the basics in school, and when we start as new grads we begin the real learning .... on the job training, it's how we all start out, right?
  13. by   AfloydRN
    Same pay, unless you take a management position.

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