higher pay for BSN grads? - page 6

Quick poll here... Does your hospital pay BSN nurses more? If yes, how much? If no, what are your thoughts on this? On a side note: Does Magnet status tie into BSN nurses?... Read More

  1. by   kellerpatty
    Quote from OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    I doubt anyone cares since I already posted this, but.......

    I've witnessed in another profession equally as important as nursing that people are rewarded for additional education. My husband transitioned from an engineer to a teacher. He is a brand new teacher with no teaching experience. All teacher candidates take an exam called the Praxis I. All Math candidates take THE SAME exam called the Praxis II in order to receive certification. Most school districts have pay scales for all employees, including those with zero experience. They have Bachelor's only, Bacherlor's 150, Master's only, Master's +15, and on and on up to PhD. My husband ranks as Bach 150, which earned him more money from the start. He has no additional responsibilities as a teacher.

    I guess I'll just have to quit nursing and become a teacher...where everything is SO MUCH FAIRER!!! ha ha
  2. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    Quote from kellerpatty
    I guess I'll just have to quit nursing and become a teacher...where everything is SO MUCH FAIRER!!! ha ha
    I definitely was not saying that teaching is a better profession than nursing (obviously not ).....just wanted to point out that other careers do reward for more education
  3. by   RNsRWe
    same pay for BSN as ADN at my hospital. Only see an increase for MSN, and even that's an insulting pittance. Not much of an incentive if you ask me.....however, that's when comparing a floor nurse ADN to a floor nurse BSN to a floor nurse MSN. Obviously if the JOB is different, so is the pay.

    So, I guess it's reasonable to say that if you're applying for a certain position, the level of education isn't as important as the qualification to do the specific job. If you're "overqualified", doesn't mean you get paid more.
    Last edit by RNsRWe on Sep 23, '06
  4. by   romie
    Quote from OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    I doubt anyone cares since I already posted this, but.......

    I've witnessed in another profession equally as important as nursing that people are rewarded for additional education. My husband transitioned from an engineer to a teacher. He is a brand new teacher with no teaching experience. All teacher candidates take an exam called the Praxis I. All Math candidates take THE SAME exam called the Praxis II in order to receive certification. Most school districts have pay scales for all employees, including those with zero experience. They have Bachelor's only, Bacherlor's 150, Master's only, Master's +15, and on and on up to PhD. My husband ranks as Bach 150, which earned him more money from the start. He has no additional responsibilities as a teacher.
    Thank you OB_or_NICU_hopeful, you clearly illustrated a point that I, too, was trying to make earlier. In alot of fields, two people working side by side performing the exact same job will make different pay depending on their level of education. Every since I earned my degrees, my salary offers have been much larger and I was told by hiring personnel that it was because my higher education merited higher pay. Why the field of nursing doesn't get with the program is beyond me.

    It isn't a matter of "haves" vs. "have nots". (Perhaps the ADNs represent the have nots?) I personally would consider myself a "have not", even though I managed to earn a master's degree. How did I do it? I did it without a single cent from my parents and by getting scholarships and taking out a frightening amount of student loans.

    Yes, it is appalling.
    Last edit by romie on Sep 23, '06
  5. by   CJRN02
    I personally think that BSN prepared nurses should get a higher pay. At least $2/hr. As has been mentioned in the above posts, they went to school longer and in all other professions, regardless of the job description, people with a bachelors get paid more. Fair or not, that is how it is. At the hospital where I work, you do get $1-3/hr more but you have to be involved in what they call a career ladder where you have to do other things like be on commitees, be a preceptor, have other certificates s/a specialty certs etc to get that extra pay. The BSN/MSN just gives you more points towrds your total to get the compensation. You can actually earn up to $6-8 more per hour by doing all those things. I think it is a great way of encouraging upward education, learning and leadership. I only have an ADN and have actually, until this hospital, have had no desire to get my BSN bc they didn't pay more. Now, with this incentive, I am enrolling in a BSN completion program.
  6. by   romie
    Good luck CJRN02 with getting your BSN. I do hope that you eventually become a preceptor because I am sure that you can teach a lot of new nurses a thing or two with your experience.
  7. by   KLStudent
    Before going to nursing school, I worked in Human Resources (at a hospital). And yes, we paid 5% more for students that had a BSN. That seems to be the way the trend is moving. Especially on the west coast.

    Many hospitals are now paying another 5% increase if you are blingual (in Spanish).

    Hope this helps.
  8. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from kellerpatty
    The POINT is that when a new nurse takes the NCLEX (yes, the same exam that every new nurse takes to become a RN) and gets their first job, they are ALL doing the SAME job. I can't think of any BSN nurses that I know who have been saddled with more expectations or responsibilities straight out of school than any other new nurse.

    It is not until the BSN (or ADN student, for that matter) student advances themselves in the workplace, that they should be compensated for their performance and responsibilities on that NEW advanced position for which they are qualified...and not before.

    Nurses should be focusing on the clinical and managerial skills gained from proven performance, experience and hard work, and not solely on the letters they have behind their name. I don't understand why having a BSN behind one's name suddenly makes that person more knowledgeable and qualified directly from nursing school (notice the "directly from school" part). I could go on and on about my experiences with BSN students and new nurses, but that's like beating a dead horse (and for every BSN student there would be an ADN student doing or not doing the same thing).

    Even a doctor, lawyer, or say, an engineer, doesn't start out at the top. If that highly-educated doctor or lawyer doesn't perform appropriately in their responsibilities they are not going to go far with that higher education...be it doctor, lawyer, nurse, or whoever.

    I must take exception to the premise that a BSN degree is more difficult...becoming and being a nurse is diffucult no matter where you study.

    The difference, in my opinion, between those with ADNs and those with BSNs is money, pure and simple. Of course, everyone would love to have an advanced degree, wouldn't they? But there are those who simply can't afford it...parents can't pay, middle class people who can't qualify for grants, and those who would prefer not to spend the beginning of their careers in deep debt when they know their employer will provide them with tuition reimbursement for further education. Why aren't the issues of enhanced subsidies and grants with equal access to further education for nursing students discussed in these US vs. THEM debates

    Again, I believe that we have a perfect example of the so-called HAVES and HAVE NOTS (for whatever reason)...with the HAVES once again thinking the HAVE NOTS are somehow inferior. Performance is performance, both in technical and managerial situations. Is a BSN with a C average still superior to an ADN with an A average.

    People seem to be implying, here, that the quality of nurses should be based solely on the school they went to and their so-called level of education and not the quality of their commitment to patients and the prevention and treatment of illnesses in all settings...managerial or technical.

    Why can't we stop this superiority complex syndrome on all sides? I'd like to know how many of us became nurses JUST for the money...

    Okay, okay...I'll get off my soapbox now, it's time for work anyway!
    Excellent post!
  9. by   mvanz9999
    Just to balance this out, I'm currently in IT. There are people in this field that have Masters degrees in MIS, and they make exactly the same, and in some cases less. In this field, they don't care about your schooling...only your experience and whether you can or cannot do the job. (I don't have any formal training in IT, but those MIS people don't make a dime more than me).
  10. by   CJRN02
    I don't understand why there is so much hostility on this subject. Yes, I realize that as an RN we all take the same test and as a staff nurse we all perform the same job. Personally, I think diploma and ADN programs are better at clinically preparing their nurses as I felt I had better clinical experience than the BSN grads I started working with, but the politics is that people who obtain a higher degree generally should get monitarily rewarded for their extra schooling. Should a nurse practitioner get paid the same as a staff nurse if they are working as a staff nurse? Just because they aren't in a NP role, should they not be compensated in some way for all their extra knowledge and education? It DOES NOT take money to get a higher degree. Most hospitals have tution assistance so even though it might take you longer, you can get your BSN completion paid for, or there is the US Reserves, that will pay for all your education if you serve one weekend a month and two weeks a year for our country, or there ARE grants for middle class folk, you just have to apply for them and work to find one that you qualify for. I get so sick and tired of people using SOCIAL CLASS as an excuse to not advance their education! In fact, people with lower class have an easier time since they can qualify for all the programs that the middle/upper class cannot. If you live in the state of NM you can get your BSN completion for free. Eastern NM University actually has a free BSN program for NM residents. There might be programs like this in other states, you just have to do some research and find out. Hope this doen't stir up more hostility, I am just trying to open the eyes of some people who seem angry and closed minded about this subject.
  11. by   CJRN02
    Romie~ Thanks for the encouragement. I do love precepting new grads. I try my hardest to change the old timers view of nursing by "eating their young". I remember all to well being harrased by the old timers when I was a new grad, and it did nothing except upset me. I learned nothing from those who were mean and hostile and everything from the ones who cut me slack for not knowing everything and allowing me to learn at my own pace. I feel as though I am a very good nurse now but took things slowly and tried not to be supernurse from the get-go. I still learn things EVERY day! It is the new grads that act like they know everything and don't want help that are really scary!
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from CJRN02
    Romie~ Thanks for the encouragement. I do love precepting new grads. I try my hardest to change the old timers view of nursing by "eating their young". I remember all to well being harrased by the old timers when I was a new grad, and it did nothing except upset me. I learned nothing from those who were mean and hostile and everything from the ones who cut me slack for not knowing everything and allowing me to learn at my own pace. I feel as though I am a very good nurse now but took things slowly and tried not to be supernurse from the get-go. I still learn things EVERY day! It is the new grads that act like they know everything and don't want help that are really scary!
    What an offensive thing to say!

    "Old-timers" are not the only ones who are guilty of treating other nurses badly; your own post is blatantly disrespectful to experienced nurses like me who do not "eat our young." Yes, we should all be so thankful there are new nurses out there to set us experienced nurses straight.
  13. by   lauralassie
    pay should be based on preformance rather than degree! If you come out of school and don't know how to do you job it shouldn't matter what kind of degree you have. (BSN<AD< DIP:OMA<MSN) Over 30 years in nursing I have worked with many new nurses. I've seen masters prepared get dissmissed from ICU because she was lost when it came to critical thinking. I've worked with AD grads who became some of the units best nurses. When you think of pay. think.... do I want to base the decision of who will care for a sick mother on what they get payed or what their skill level is.As for me I would rather go with skill level. (by-the-way 4, years doesn't equate to skill)

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