Don't forget the BS - page 2

I'm not going to argue whether RN's should be diploma, 2 year, or 4 year, but what I have a complaint about is that for those of us with a BS with a major in nursing get left out of the loop. Many... Read More

  1. by   scrubsnhugsRN
    You are right not all degrees are the same, and certainly some require more prerequisites, higher classes than another. I have an Associates in Applied Science in Nursing. My university set us up so it would be an easy transition into BSN.
    However, there is another university that is offering ADN here and the coursework is not the same. Meaning they have less (lower level) math, science, and humanties..and yet everyone calls me the same degree ADN. It took me 3 and half years to get my degree not 2 without having summer breaks!! Grrr. I guess it doesnt matter, since I dont have my BS yet.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    BAN
    BSN
    BS

    Goes to show, we all need to remember, nursing is an ART and SCIENCE.
  3. by   LaborNurse1
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    BAN
    BSN
    BS

    Goes to show, we all need to remember, nursing is an ART and SCIENCE.
    Very good point!
    Last edit by Tweety on Apr 15, '07 : Reason: Removed personal blog - it may be in profile, but not posts...Thanks.
  4. by   Jolie
    LaborNurse1,

    I know exactly what you are saying, and agree that there is a tremendous amount of confusion about the distinction between the two degrees.

    I graduated 20 years ago from a Bachelor's Degree program, and we actually had a 1 hour lecture in our Nursing Leadership course presented by the Chair of our department to make certain we knew that our degree was a "Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in Nursing", and NOT a BSN.

    She wasn't trying to give us the impression that one degree was superior to the other, but to make sure that we didn't misrepresent ourselves, since placing BSN on our name badges would be incorrectly stating our credentials.

    Must have been a huge pet peeve of hers!
  5. by   queenjean
    Really, who cares? Is this really something to get one's panties in a wad about? Do I get to list all my "initials" after my name, and should I expect everyone to know (or care) what the differences are?

    When I clicked on this thread, I thought the BS was going to stand for Bull X; I was thinking someone was posting a thread about the crap one has to go through to earn a Bachelors of Science. But on the other hand, maybe I was right???

    Seriously, I can't believe it makes you angry that people don't understand what the exact requirements of your program or your degree were. I'm going out on a limb here and just completely expose my ignorance by admitting that I assumed that ALL programs had a bit of variety in what they required for nursing school. Why else would I have taken cultural anthropology for one potential program, and chemistry and physics for another?

    Your letters don't make you a good or a bad nurse; don't let it get you so uptight and angry. I'm sorry, this just sounds petty. So you are a BS; get over it.
    Last edit by sirI on Apr 23, '07 : Reason: TOS for language
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    The original poster was saying why this concerns her. Let's just respect that opinion and each other's accomplishments. For some, this may be "splitting hairs" but clearly, others, it's a concern. We can agree to disagree.
  7. by   LaborNurse1
    Quote from queenjean
    Really, who cares? Is this really something to get one's panties in a wad about? Do I get to list all my "initials" after my name, and should I expect everyone to know (or care) what the differences are?

    When I clicked on this thread, I thought the BS was going to stand for Bull X; I was thinking someone was posting a thread about the crap one has to go through to earn a Bachelors of Science. But on the other hand, maybe I was right???

    Seriously, I can't believe it makes you angry that people don't understand what the exact requirements of your program or your degree were. I'm going out on a limb here and just completely expose my ignorance by admitting that I assumed that ALL programs had a bit of variety in what they required for nursing school. Why else would I have taken cultural anthropology for one potential program, and chemistry and physics for another?

    Your letters don't make you a good or a bad nurse; don't let it get you so uptight and angry. I'm sorry, this just sounds petty. So you are a BS; get over it.
    Wow, I think this gets you more upset than me! I was just posting my frustration with the lack of awareness and assumptions, is all. I was never stating one degree was better than the other, just different. Yes it does aggravate me but clearly not as much as the post bothers you!
    Last edit by sirI on Apr 23, '07 : Reason: quoted edited post
  8. by   time4meRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Many have 4 year degrees besides and other than BSN. In addition, I know of many 2nd or 3rd degree RNs who have ADN plus BA pr degrees in related fields like biology, chemistry or psychology/social work, yet "they" just tear them down as "only AD nurses". I wish we could just respect everyone's educational accomplishments period.

    Well said, thank you !
    :spin: :smiley_aa :bowingpur
  9. by   Myxel67
    I have a BA in English & Secondary Education. When I attended this particular school, they granted BA (Bachelor of Arts) and BS (Bachelor or Science) degrees. The difference? To get the BA required 2 years of college level foreign language. School was also associated with the Floyd County Hospital School of Nursing. Nursing student could leave after 3 years and test for RN, or stay 4 years and graduate with BS.
  10. by   Athenas83
    Quote from LaborNurse1
    I'm not going to argue whether RN's should be diploma, 2 year, or 4 year, but what I have a complaint about is that for those of us with a BS with a major in nursing get left out of the loop. Many times we are just given the title BSN because we have the 4 year degree, but in fact, these two are slightly different.

    I have seen my name with someone else adding the title BSN and it really aggravates me! :angryfire

    Anyhow...my understanding of the difference is that the BS with a major in nursing is a 4 year degree awarded by the university/college, not a college within the university system, and therefore requires a few more credits for graduation. The BSN is awarded to students who attended a College of Nursing school within a university. In other words, its a separate division within the school that has different graduation requirements, albeit not much different than other divisions within the university but different none the less.

    Am I alone on this one?
    Wow, I've never heard of this. I would think they'd give you a BSN. What if you wanted to go on and get your MSN. Would there be a difference when applying to the school over someone with a BSN degree?
  11. by   LaborNurse1
    Athena,
    that's a good question. I am currently in school for an MSN, and the BS with a major in nursing was never an issue. Makes sense given that many graduate programs are now accepting non nursing bachelors.
  12. by   donsterRN
    I had no idea of the difference. I learned something. Thanks!
  13. by   carolinapooh
    Me too.

    At Duke, I've seen nurses on the floor who are "BS, RN" and others who are "BSN, RN". Come to think of it, I've seen it in every hospital I've ever been in.

    Now I know.

    I'm a bit of a cop on this sort of stuff myself. Yes, it's petty, I'm sure - but I understand the point of people being upset. You are what you are, you earned what you earned - so you want it given that way. I don't blame you a bit.

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