Considering an ADN over a BSN but already have a bachelors - page 2

by heyitsryan | 10,049 Views | 38 Comments

Hello everyone, I had a question regarding the associates and the bachelor's degree in nursing. Currently I am active duty Air Force, but plan on getting out soon and am hoping to change my career to nursing. I have a degree... Read More


  1. 0
    Wow...didn't take long! Was going to right a rebuttal however by the number of responses, I'm sure you are smart enough to make a decision. Again bro, do what is best for your situation .....Good Luck....Keep in mind the accelrated and traditional BSN programs may present as a bit more difficult to work while going through. Sure there are people who have done it and have done fine. Just and FYI....
  2. 1
    Quote from loriangel14
    If you want to be an NP you will need your BSN at some point.You may as well get it now.Your other degrees will be of little use as a nurse and an employer won't care about non nursing degrees.
    *** There is no need to have a BSN if one wants to be an advanced practice nurse. Many schools will accept other degrees and some schools don't require a degree at all. One can go from RN to MSN without having or obtaining a bachelors degree.
    However the BSN won't hurt and would give more options.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Paco-RN
    If you have a BA or BS in another discipline, the accelerated BSN is the way to go. Done in one year. By the time you're starting the 2nd year of an ADN program you could (ideally) already be licensed and working and making money as a BSN, RN.
    *** I thought that most of those programs required pre-reqs that would make the whole thing considerably longer than a year?
  4. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** There is no need to have a BSN if one wants to be an advanced practice nurse. Many schools will accept other degrees and some schools don't require a degree at all. One can go from RN to MSN without having or obtaining a bachelors degree.
    However the BSN won't hurt and would give more options.
    I for got the OP was in the US. I am in Canada and our programs are different. Up here you have to be a nurse before NP.
  5. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I thought that most of those programs required pre-reqs that would make the whole thing considerably longer than a year?
    Aside from the A&P sort of pre-reqs I think they some how make a leap from BSinsomething to MSN. I think it really depends on the pre-reqs for your other degree.

    And focker---well, apparently you didn't read the other discussions. Shame. I would expect a nurse from any degree background to read more.
  6. 0
    You got me good itsnowornever.....however just for my own sanity and the fact that I only look a pictures in big books only because I don't need to read anymore....please tell me where I stated that I believe ADN's were prepared better in my original post....if you can find it, then I would argue you are not as illiterate as I thought....

    don't do personal attacks on this forum...thats what FB is for!
    Last edit by focker14 on Sep 26, '12 : Reason: more to say
  7. 0
    It depends. Do you want to start working right away? I also have a BS in Leadership. I went for an ADN because I wanted to get working faster. I live in San Diego County, and I was hired in an acute care hospital before I even passed my boards. I went straight into a RN-BSN bridge program as soon as I got acclimated into my new position, and will have my BSN by April 2013.

    ADNs not getting hired in large city environments is FALSE. They DO get hired. Most of my class is working now, many in hospitals. Big name, magnet status hospitals, with ADNs. The best way to get these jobs is to network during clinicals. Work as a CNA, participate in volunteer opportunities. It's all about networking, and building relationships during school. It's ALL about who you know.

    Best of luck with your decision.
  8. 0
    I'm an ADN student, I have a Bachelor's already. While I was applying to programs, I could only apply to ADN programs because the universities that had BSN programs weren't able to take any 2nd Bachelor's students. Given a choice, I'd have gone with an ABSN program as it's fast, efficient, and I'm done in about a year. I didn't have that choice, so I went with what's available, and started to set myself up for a transition to an RN-BSN program. The good news is that I can get a BSN very quickly: just about 6 courses and I'm done. I can also take 4 courses and I'm set up for an MSN program. Or I could take those 4 courses as a post-bac student, get qualified as an MSN student, and while waiting for the program to begin, I take the last 2 courses and "score" a BSN on the way. Direct Entry MSN was considered, but I decided against it because some places won't accept those grads, even if they'd passed the same NCLEX-RN exam that everyone else took.

    I'm going to have a hard enough time getting a job as pretty much everyone has difficulty finding them, but... it won't be because I'm not clinically prepared to begin working as a new grad.
  9. 0
    Quote from loriangel14
    I for got the OP was in the US. I am in Canada and our programs are different. Up here you have to be a nurse before NP.
    *** The same is true here. The difference is that you don't have to have a BSN to be an RN here. What I was saying was that an experienced RN can become an MSN NP without first (or ever) obtaining a bachelors degree.
  10. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** The same is true here. The difference is that you don't have to have a BSN to be an RN here. What I was saying was that an experienced RN can become an MSN NP without first (or ever) obtaining a bachelors degree.
    Ahhh gotcha.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top