BSN's vs. Community college - page 8

Hi all. I just wanted to say that nurses with BSN's in my opinion should be paid more, and have preference in the hiring process. In community college they basically pay you to go, and at a... Read More

  1. by   Zizka
    Quick response: I'm an LPN after working in computers for 18 years I decided on a career change to a nurse. Couldn't afford to take 2/3 years out to RN and did the LPN in 13 months.

    I'm gonna go the quick route next and get RN with an associate degree.

    Don't see the point on going to BSN and missing out on working as an RN for a year since there's such a shortage of nurses and i'll be able to get a good job as an associate since they'll just be looking for RN title.

    Get the BSN later down the road

    PS, worked all over the world in computers and settled in the US. Love nursing. It's like surfing a wave and juggling 18 things at once.
  2. by   SE_BSN_RN
    Quote from icugirl33
    I graduated from a BSN program in MAY 2005 and my school now has the highest passing rate in the state 97%. I have 5 and half months experience as a nurse and a couple of weeks ago decided that I wanted to tranfer to a specialty area. I applied, was interviewed within 3 days, and got the job on the spot. The second question out of the director's mouth was where did I go to school? My coworker with 10 years of nursing experience, 4 of which are on my old floor (telemetry) applied, interviewed with the same people and didn't get the job. She is an extremely nice woman and figured if I got the job, it should be a breeze for her, she was wrong. I don't think a BSN should get paid more for bedside nursing, but it does help you get off that floor a lot quicker.
    When my year comes up in June, I will be applying for a clinical manager job. Due to the fact by then I will be half way through an MSN program, I'm confident my lack of bedside nursing experience will not keep me from getting the job. I will play up my education. Therefore, education is never a waste. If your long term goal is not to be a bedside nurse, get your BSN and higher.
    Yikes, I don't want you at my bedside! 5 and 1/2 months as a nurse, and all that education doesn't reassure me that you know what you are doing. I have almost 2 years of experience and an 18 month LPN degree and am going back for another year for my RN, so can I play up my education and lack of experience to get a job? Scary. I hope things work out for you but you may be in for a big surprise, I promise you that!
    Last edit by SE_BSN_RN on Mar 5, '07
  3. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from icugirl33
    I graduated from a BSN program in MAY 2005 and my school now has the highest passing rate in the state 97%. I have 5 and half months experience as a nurse and a couple of weeks ago decided that I wanted to tranfer to a specialty area. I applied, was interviewed within 3 days, and got the job on the spot. The second question out of the director's mouth was where did I go to school? My coworker with 10 years of nursing experience, 4 of which are on my old floor (telemetry) applied, interviewed with the same people and didn't get the job. She is an extremely nice woman and figured if I got the job, it should be a breeze for her, she was wrong. I don't think a BSN should get paid more for bedside nursing, but it does help you get off that floor a lot quicker.
    I realize this is an old thread and an old post, but for those reading it anew, I thought I'd offer something: when *I* interviewed as a brandy new grad, my interviewer also asked me very early on (first couple of questions) and once she knew my answer, the rest of the interview was on autopilot. She knew I had succeeded in passing a killer program that was known for turning out good RNs, and wanted me THEN.

    It was a 2-year college. ADN. But an excellent school. And THAT got me more interest than the BSN grad. Go figure
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from lvn2bsoon
    Yikes, I don't want you at my bedside! 5 and 1/2 months as a nurse, and all that education doesn't reassure me that you know what you are doing. I have almost 2 years of experience and an 18 month LPN degree and am going back for another year for my RN, so can I play up my education and lack of experience to get a job? Scary. I hope things work out for you but you may be in for a big surprise, I promise you that!
    You don't want inexperienced nurses at your bedside? We all were inexperienced nurses at someone's bedside at one point in time.

    The poster was not applying for a bedside nursing position, but a management position after a year at the bedside. Playing up your education for these types of jobs is definately a plus. How the person got the bedside position over someone with 10 years experience is a mystery that speaks that there's more to the story than just a degree and what the this poster knows, because she/he wasn't a fly on the wall during the interview, in my opinion.

    However, the reality is that if a job is "BSN-preferred", the BSN, even with less experience gets the job over the ADN who probably is equally and maybe more qualitied.
  5. by   lauralassie
    Quote from cottoncandyclouds
    Hi all.

    I just wanted to say that nurses with BSN's in my opinion should be paid more, and have preference in the hiring process. In community college they basically pay you to go, and at a University, you take on soooo many student loans. The upper division classes are much more difficult at a University and I truly feel it's unfair to group the two (BSN, and community) together. It's completley different. I have heard that there are some states that requrire a BSN if that's true, I think it's great.
    Bye for now.


    It's your choice for the loans. Shouldn't get paid more because you chose one rout over another. By-the-way. I went to a diploma school, we had all of our classes from a major university. Yes , the classes were tough. But, I can't speak to other programs. I didn't go there. If some one went to a community college it's OK. We took the same state boards. The higher pay should be based on work preformance. From my many years teaching and precepting students. In the state I live, many BSN's would have lower pay. Not because they're not smart, but because they have in general less clinical experience.
  6. by   tanya4444
    Question: does anyone have info about transferring an RN lisence from state to state? I am about to start an accelerated MSN program that certifies us as an RN along the way. I will not have a BSN but I will be a licensed RN after sitting for the boards next summer. What happens if I want to take time off and work in a state different than the one I am licensed in? I'll most likely be going to school in California.

    Any help or recommended resources on this topic would be much appreciated!

    Thanks!
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from tanya4444
    Question: does anyone have info about transferring an RN lisence from state to state? I am about to start an accelerated MSN program that certifies us as an RN along the way. I will not have a BSN but I will be a licensed RN after sitting for the boards next summer. What happens if I want to take time off and work in a state different than the one I am licensed in? I'll most likely be going to school in California.

    Any help or recommended resources on this topic would be much appreciated!

    Thanks!
    You're way off topic, and I'm wondering if you really meant to post it here.

    Once you pass NCLEX RN, it's a matter of contacting the board of nursing in the state that you want to work in. Usually you pay a fee and you get your license there, no big deal.

    Good luck!
  8. by   iluvmynavyman
    bsn's should be paid more for a higher degree just like any other profession and the job description should be a little different
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from iluvmynavyman
    bsn's should be paid more for a higher degree just like any other profession and the job description should be a little different
    I think the NCLEX should be different then as well if the job descriptions are different. Then again, what would I suggest with persons like myself going ADN to BSN, have us take NCLEX again? On 2nd thought..................
  10. by   bymysoultosqueezeRN
    Quote from iluvmynavyman
    bsn's should be paid more for a higher degree just like any other profession and the job description should be a little different
    AND THEY ARE!! the hospital in my city is paying bsn nurses additional 1000 a year , 500 for part time bsn nurses. maybe its not a huge difference but they call it RECOGNITION, for all of you out there who NEED this recognition for going to school a year or two more so bad.
  11. by   jennbn
    OK I was going to ignore this topic because it is very tired but I had to interject. I graduate next week with an ADN, HOWEVER, I am perfectly capable of obtaining a BSN but the opportunity to do so was not there. I am 30 years old, I do not have parents paying my tuition, and fiscally it was not responsible for me to pursure a BSN initially. That being said, I enter a RN-BSN-MSN accelerated program in January (now that scholarships are kicking in) I hope when I graduate I don't consider myself suddenly better than an ADN. We all wipe the same butts and deal with the same stuff. If you want more money pursue your masters, leave floor nursing or take a job in administration. Until then quit frowning on ADNs....we are your help in the hall. There is not always a BSN standing there when you need one...
  12. by   emtb2rn
    Quote from Cookie_Monster
    AND THEY ARE!! the hospital in my city is paying bsn nurses additional 1000 a year , 500 for part time bsn nurses. maybe its not a huge difference but they call it RECOGNITION, for all of you out there who NEED this recognition for going to school a year or two more so bad.
    What about folks who don't have BSN's, but have bachelor's and let's even say master's degrees in other fields. And also have years of management experience as well. These folks are bringing a lot to the party, so why not compensate them the same as you would a BSN grad?
  13. by   jjjoy
    Quote from emtb2rn
    What about folks who don't have BSN's, but have bachelor's and let's even say master's degrees in other fields. And also have years of management experience as well. These folks are bringing a lot to the party, so why not compensate them the same as you would a BSN grad?
    I do think a bachelor's degree in any field should qualify a nurse for a higher differential. And if they have other relevant experience or additional related education then that would also merit a little higher pay. Thus, experience teaching world history or having a PhD in astrophysics wouldn't count for anything extra but experience working in infection control or having a master's in health care administration would qualify one for a higher pay differential.

    In this ideal scenario, nursing experience itself also merits pay progressive pay increases. And getting certified in speciality areas and additional skills would also increase one's income. Thus, there would be multiple ways for a nurse to increase their earning power without having to leave the bedside.

    All this without any fundamental change to the job description. Teaching is an example of a field where an employee can increase their pay with more education but the job role is the same regardless. In another field, a friend of mine just got a small pay increase for becoming certified in Microsoft Word. There was no change in job responsibilities.

close