BSN vs. Associates - page 3

by askater | 4,207 Views | 54 Comments

I keep reading the topic about Dying career. I keep reading seeing what WE CAN DO. And what's brought up time and time again is associate nurses putting down bachelors and vice a versa. I thought I'd open a thread...because I... Read More


  1. 0
    Hi everyone,
    Somehow I feel very sad that this devisive issue is still being debated after 30+ years. It is my personal feeling that I am not defined by what degress I have. I am defined because I am a nurse. Being nurse is what means something special to me and for the clients I care for. I started out with an ADN, then I went back to school and received a BSN, now I've returned to school again and I am currently an FNP student in and MSN program. Has my education helped me? That's a definite yes. It certainly has opened many more employement opportunities and helped me expand many new professional horizons. Do I consider myself "more professional?" That's a no. No matter what degree I had at the time, I feel I have always attempted to act with the utmost professionalism. A degree does not insure professionalism. That comes from inside each nurse. I feel for the most part, most of the nurses I have worked with feel this way too. I respect every nurse who goes about their work everyday, trying to do their best, and take care of their patients. There is room for every nurse. We need to end this very old and stale debate; and get on with being the best professional nurses we all can be.
  2. 0
    I have been a ADN graduate for 18yrs. In my training our curriculum was more strenuous that the BSN program at that time. I had worked in Pediatrics for 16 yrs and was charge nurse for 6yrs. I have since moved to Canada....and after getting my registration, was hired as a supervisory in a health care agency and just recently offered a job in a teaching capacity. So I find that my ADN has not been a problem with getting the jobs that I want. I do feel that when I graduated I was prepared to be a Nurse.
  3. 0
    I am currently a student in a BSN program and this is a very hot topic at school. From my understanding, both ADN and BSN programs take the same amount of time to acquire. ADNs have to have two years of prerequisites, just like BSN students. Then you do two years of sheer nursing school. From a research article presented by my favorite professor, both ADN and BSN graduates perform at the same level in six months. My whole point is that this is really a waste of time debate, because in the end both programs yield RNs. From some of the other discussions we can see that ADNs and BSNs can both be in management. Its all about the person and how they practice. I am sure that there are good and not so good nurses coming from both programs. But hey, maybe one day the same will be required across the board to be licensed to practice.
    ltm
  4. 0
    I STARTED MY NURSING EDUCATION WITH A BSN PROGRAM AT A PRIVATE COLLEGE ONLY TO FIND OUT AFTER A COUPLE YEARS I FELT I WAS PAYING A LOT OF MONEY FOR ALL THE "FLUFF". I THEN TRANSFERRED TO AN ADN PROGRAM THINKING I WOULD HAVE AN EASY TIME GETTING THROUGH IT WITH LITTLE EFFORT SINCE I CAME FROM A BSN PROGRAM. THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER IS WE ALL NEED TO BE PREPARED FOR THE SAME STATE BOARDS AND WHERE I LIVE THERE ISN'T A HIGHER WAGE FOR BSN VS. ADN UNLESS YOU HOLD A DIFFERENT POSITION IE. CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST, ETC. MOST OF THE BSN GRADUATES I'VE WORKED WITH LACK COMMON SENSE AND COMPASSION. THEY SPEND MOST OF THEIR TIME DELEGATING TASKS TO OTHERS IN AN EFFORT NOT TO GET THEIR HANDS DIRTY, STILL COLLECTING A PAYCHECK. ALSO, OUR NAME BADGES END WITH "RN" NOT "BSN" OR "ADN". I HOPE I GOT MY POINT ACROSS WITHOUT SEEMING HOSTILE.

    [This message has been edited by JOY, RN (edited February 24, 2000).]

    [This message has been edited by JOY, RN (edited February 24, 2000).]
  5. 0
    You know what's funny....I really don't know what R.N.'s have B.S.N or A.D.N degrees. That never comes up. (probably not a lot of it is there's not much time for social discussion...and most time is with patient care) Personally it doesn't matter to me....we're ALL R.N's. And we're all doing the same job.

    JOY R.N.--I wonder why B.S.N students lack COMMON SENSE and COMPASSION? I for ONE...as an B.S.N. do not LACK COMMON SENSE and COMPASSION. But thanks for your interesting finding.

    *****
    To receive respect, we must respect one another




  6. 0
    To prevent retyping my thoughts on this issue, please read my response in the general nursing discussion - "Do you feel adequately prepared to practice nursing..."

    Thanks.
  7. 0
    I am going to reply in a different tangent. I too am an ADN R.N., and because of pre reqs. it took me almost 4 years to get that degree. I am now in the last semester of an RN to BSN program, and of course completing my Management and Leadership coursework. Just today there was a lively discussion in class about 2 year vs. 4 year degrees, the lack of self-esteem, the catagorization us as basic labor (dont get ruffled over the terminology). By continuing the debate we are once again devided and conquered. There is a study being performed in California (or was to be performed, I see if it was) on how to make Nursing programs more accessible and less time consuming, especially for those matriculating from 2 year to 4 year program. This is another obstacle to keep nurses infighting and defending their 2 year degrees. I am not putting them down, but what about us as professionals, no MDs, Accts., Lawyers, etc. practice with a 2 year degree. We are sorely underrepresented in our own professional organizations and this lead to a depletion of power. It also leaved us looking like laborers, even the managers with BSNs. We do not have the power that professional unity would lend to us. **Please see Leaving Management thread!
  8. 0
    This is a very interesting discussion.
    I currently work with 40 other nurses,and of course have worked with hundreds in the past-- and don't really take note of "what degree" someone has. I take note of "what apparent skills" (including technical/management/interpersonal) that person has. My experience has given me what I have, way beyond what you may know of me if you only knew :diploma. What would I be saying if I were BSN? I hope the same thing. Seems the profession must go toward differentiating licenses, but with the current "shortage" -along with that one in the "not too distant" past, will that ever be reality? This topic has been uppermost in my mind, as my current "boss" is in a doctorate program--and is a huge fan of continuous advancement of education. Thank you everyone for this discussion.
  9. 0
    I agree the degree doesn't make the nurse. Different degrees are meant for different health care goals. Working a floor, managing patient care, managing a team of health care providers and the philosophy of heath care managment. Old topic.... If the specific degree is the debate then maybe we should all have our master? I don't think so.
    If you can pass the boards and obtain your registration, you have the basics. Enhancing that skill is individual prefernce.
  10. 0
    Hi Everybody!!!!
    I have a unique view on this dilemma. I have been in the nursing field for ten years, all of which has been at the LVN level of care. Currently I am attending the LVN to BSN bridge program, offered at Sonoma State University in California, and will graduate this May. The perspective I have to offer on this issue is that I too have worked with many nurses with various levels of degrees or certifications obtained from various institutions of learning. The one facet I have learned about most people is that they bring their own personal agenda with them while they are getting their education in nursing and after becoming a nurse regardless of what level of education they eventually receive. If a person enters this profession for the money then you have a nurse that will only work for a paycheck and watch the clock more than the patient. On the other hand, if a person enters this profession to help others then you have a person that will work FOR THE PATIENT. That is what it all comes down to anyways, the patient.

    Many of you are also correct in one aspect; the degree that hangs on the wall does not make the nurse, but I also think that each of us must not stop and convince ourselves that we have learned everything there is about this profession. Information becomes outdated the same as technology does and we all need to keep up the changes. Because after all of the education a person may have or all of the experience obtained; it is the person's choice to either shine or fade away.

    An ancient proverb states, "A tiger wears its stripes on the outside, a person wears theirs on the inside", I believe this is the mindset we all need towards this issue.

    ------------------


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