BSN vs ADN

  1. 0 In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    I am not discounting the BSN but as a BSN myself I know that I don't hold a candle to someone with a ADN and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    Thoughts?
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  3. Visit  Sassybottom profile page

    About Sassybottom

    Joined Mar '06; Posts: 149; Likes: 37.

    22 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  MidwifeWannaB profile page
    0
    I personally am going to get my BSN rather than my ADN because I want to be a midwife, which means a masters or doctorate. For me, it just makes more sense from a time management standpoint.

    When it comes to the workforce though, I would think you have a point. However, not being a nurse yet I can't really say much. :wink2:
  5. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    0
    I chose the ADN because it's the fastest and most cost-effective route for me...and you're right--nothing beats hands-on work experience, and I'll get plenty of that fast

    If I had the time/money, I'd do the BSN instead because it does open up more opportunities (management, education, etc.). But eventually, I'll get one.

    Oh yeah, there's actually a whole forum devoted to this topic
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f283/
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Aug 12, '07
  6. Visit  snowfreeze profile page
    2
    Why do we even argue this issue, each nurse has their own career path. An ADN gets you to bedside faster and just as prepared as a BSN. A BSN or Masters without bedside experience prepares you for management without a real experience related to those you are making decisions for. It is not a perfect world and I am sure we all do the best we can with what training and experience we have to work with.
    jmgrn65 and Marie_LPN, RN like this.
  7. Visit  **All Heart RN** profile page
    0
    I agree with the previous poster in that we all choose the path that is right for us...this is a topic that has been beaten into the ground and will continue to be because it is just a hot button issue.

    I have a previous degree in Psychology and so it made sense to just get my BSN in Nursing because with all of my previous credits transferred, it would take the same amount of time to get either an ASN or BSN. In addition, I know that bedside nursing is not where I want to remain. One of the reasons I chose nursing is because of the endless options in career paths within the field. I want all doors open for me, so I chose a BSN.

    I graduate in 1 yr and will then work in the hospital for a few years and then go back to get my MSN/MPH.

    I love nursing....so many choices, so little time---and that's why I chose Nursing!:spin:
  8. Visit  missippichild profile page
    0
    I am finding that here in the Memphis, Tenn area, associate RNs are being discriminated against in all areas of hiring; unless you are willing to work only floors at night on weekends, you had better get your BSN before trying to look for work. Here work experience means nothing.
  9. Visit  Jessy_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from missippichild
    I am finding that here in the Memphis, Tenn area, associate RNs are being discriminated against in all areas of hiring; unless you are willing to work only floors at night on weekends, you had better get your BSN before trying to look for work. Here work experience means nothing.
    Personally, I chose ADN because it was the only choice for me. I chose a private school so that I would bypass the dreaded waiting list-plus found my school to have the fairest entry system (points vs. lottery).

    I would have LOVED to get my BSN-but was not going to risk being put in a waiting list.

    I am now done, and will be going back for my BSN.
  10. Visit  scooterRN52 profile page
    0
    Quote from Sassybottom
    In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    I am not discounting the BSN but as a BSN myself I know that I don't hold a candle to someone with a ADN and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    Thoughts?
    I have an ADN RN and I think 2 years is all the schooling that is needed. I think experience makes a tremendous difference. I have been an RN for 18 years and
    I was an LPN for 2 years prior to me becomming an RN. I have tried a BSN program and didn't like it, but I am now looking into an accelllerated 2 year program. I am doing this so I can work longer in a different capacity.


    scooterRN52
  11. Visit  preppygirl profile page
    2
    Quote from Sassybottom
    In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    I am not discounting the BSN but as a BSN myself I know that I don't hold a candle to someone with a ADN and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    Thoughts?

    If you want to have it all. Get the BSN and the experience. Have the whole package.:spin:
    Tweety and llg like this.
  12. Visit  San Diego New Grad profile page
    0
    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    Personally, I chose ADN because it was the only choice for me. I chose a private school so that I would bypass the dreaded waiting list-plus found my school to have the fairest entry system (points vs. lottery).

    I would have LOVED to get my BSN-but was not going to risk being put in a waiting list.

    I am now done, and will be going back for my BSN.
    Good for you! I just completed my ASN and am taking the NCLEX next week! I chose community college because I had to. They are the only ones who offer a weekend/evening program which allowed me to work full time and still go to nursing school. No university where I live has a program like that for a BSN--all are day programs that would require me to quit my job.

    But I'm a big fan of education and love learning, and I would like to eventually get my BSN while I work as an RN so that I can open more doors toward advanced practice and/or research. Even if I don't go that route, I don't think more education is ever a waste. Conversely, not going on to a BSN doesn't make you stop learning either.
  13. Visit  Jessy_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from San Diego New Grad
    Good for you! I just completed my ASN and am taking the NCLEX next week! I chose community college because I had to. They are the only ones who offer a weekend/evening program which allowed me to work full time and still go to nursing school. No university where I live has a program like that for a BSN--all are day programs that would require me to quit my job.

    But I'm a big fan of education and love learning, and I would like to eventually get my BSN while I work as an RN so that I can open more doors toward advanced practice and/or research. Even if I don't go that route, I don't think more education is ever a waste. Conversely, not going on to a BSN doesn't make you stop learning either.
    Congratulations and God bless you next week while taking NCLEX. I am taking mine in 2 weeks as well...........

    I agree, education is never wasted and like you, I love learning!
  14. Visit  zenman profile page
    0
    Quote from Sassybottom
    In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    I am not discounting the BSN but as a BSN myself I know that I don't hold a candle to someone with a ADN and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    Thoughts?
    What about this:

    1 year (LPN) in school + 2 years of experience (I know some LPN programs are longer)

    2 years (ADN) in school + 2 years of experience

    4 years (BSN) in school + 2 years of experience

    6 years (MSN) in school + 2 years of experience

    Now, everyone is equal in terms of experience. Now what do you have?

    You're always behind someone with experience. The new physician I'm working with is behind me but what about when she has my years in? She'll be ahead.
  15. Visit  guerrierdelion profile page
    0
    Quote from sassybottom
    in a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    i honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    i am not discounting the bsn but as a bsn myself i know that i don't hold a candle to someone with a adn and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    thoughts?
    [font="garamond"]http://www.dcardillo.com/articles/ce...diversity.html

    "adn vs. bsn: who's the better nurse? this is the debate that just will not die. just mention the topic to two or more nurses and a heated discussion will likely ensue. while an argument can be made about the pros and cons of various entry-level options in nursing, none of those arguments has anything to do with which produces a better nurse. despite some program differences, both adn and bsn grads take the nclex-rn exam and are held to the same rigid standards for licensure and practice.

    nursing candidates are no longer the homogenous group they were 30 years ago. some candidates are coming into nursing in mid-life with degrees in other disciplines and significant work experience. and every prospective nurse has different career aspirations, personal and family commitments, and work/life experience.

    i'm a big supporter of higher education and would encourage nurses to continue with their formal education. but whether a nurse gets that education at entry level or at a later time is an individual choice based on life circumstances, resources, and career aspirations."


    [font="garamond"]"i'm not afraid of storms, for i'm learning how to sail my ship."
    louisa may alcott quotes (american author known for her children's books, especially the classic little women. 1832-1888)


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