BSN vs ADN - page 3

In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling. I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a... Read More

  1. Visit  lilcajunnurse profile page
    3
    I'm an LPN who is currently enrolling in an ADN program and will move on to my BSN after. So, if you have time and money--go straight for the BSN. BUT........it doesnt matter what is behind your name. A good nurse IS only as good as her experiences. That is why as a nurse you can learn something new everyday and from ANYONE in the nursing field. I have been an LPN for 13 years and I have had some great CNAs teach me things and I have had new grads teach me things. When a new grad (RN) comes to our facility and states she feels like she doesnt know anything.. we talk about her experiences in clinicals and I can just betcha she will be able to teach me something new. WE learn from each other as well as our own experiences:spin:
    Hydakins, jmgrn65, and rn/writer like this.
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  3. Visit  llg profile page
    2
    As many people have pointed out, people choose different educational programs and paths because of the particular circumstances of their lives. Fortunately, all entry-level programs provide the necessary foundation to practice safely and to build upon with further education -- be that further education formal or informal, experiential or academic.

    But as we fantasize about "perfect worlds," that we would create if we could ... we need to keep a few things in mind:

    1. Not everybody learns from experience. Just because a person has X number of years of experience does not mean that they learned anything from that experience. Some people make the same mistakes, year after year after year. Look around your workplace. Have all of the nurses with many years of experience kept up with the latest information? Do they all have the same level of knowledge and expertise? How would you measure experiential learning so that you could verify it and give credit for it?

    Well, in fact, that's what the whole process of certification was designed to do -- to give people an opportunity to document their expertise in a specific field that does not require advanced education. That's why most certification exams require a clinical experience. It's a way for people to document what they have learned through experience and through informal education (reading on their own, going to conferences, etc.).

    2. Also, let's not forget that the types of things you learn in academic programs is different from the types of things most people learn from experience. This is particularly true at the higher levels of formal education. For example ... When a person spends years being a staff nurse and learns from that experience, what they are probably learning is how to take care of patients. That's very valuable and they deserve to be honored and rewarded for that knowledge and expertise. They should get certified and their employer should compensate them appropriately.

    However, that staff nurse is probably not learning much about the academic side of nursing -- which is the purpose of graduate education. Bedside experience does not usually teach someone about statistics, research methods, theory, etc. It's also rare (but not totally unheard of) for a person to learn that academic content through self-directed reading, conference attendance, etc. For that type of knowledge and expertise, a person usually has to go to graduate school. Twenty years of bedside experience isn't going to teach that type of stuff. And if you do make the effort to learn it on your own through self-study, how would you document your learning so that you could credit for it? Higher education formalizes that type of education and documents the student's achievement so that the world knows that the student has at least a basic level of those advanced skills and knowledge. The people who have done that should also be recognized and compensated appropriately.

    In other words ... while all types of learning, knowledge, and expertise should be honored and compensated appropriately ... they are not interchangable.
    arciedee and Spidey's mom like this.
  4. Visit  scooterRN52 profile page
    0
    Quote from Sassybottom
    In a profession like nursing it would seem that nursing experience counts for so much more than an extra two years of schooling.

    I honestly don't understand why there is a high regard for a bachelor's degree in nursing.

    I am not discounting the BSN but as a BSN myself I know that I don't hold a candle to someone with a ADN and 2 years of working experience.

    4 years in school vs. 2 years in school + 2 years of working experience.


    Thoughts?
    I think it is a good idea to get a BSN and I think by 2010-2015 it may be required
    I am looking into an accellerated program to get my BSN, only to work in a different capacity. Training,education, and experience are 3 different things, but it is nice to have all three because it rounds you out as a professional nurse. I think
    2 year ADN is all that is needed to work at the bedside which is the heart of nursing. Some BSN's aren't as prepared as the ADN clinically.:spin:
  5. Visit  scooterRN52 profile page
    1
    Quote from guerrierdelion
    [font="garamond"]http://www.dcardillo.com/articles/ce...diversity.html

    "adn vs. bsn: who's the better nurse? this is the debate that just will not die. just mention the topic to two or more nurses and a heated discussion will likely ensue. while an argument can be made about the pros and cons of various entry-level options in nursing, none of those arguments has anything to do with which produces a better nurse. despite some program differences, both adn and bsn grads take the nclex-rn exam and are held to the same rigid standards for licensure and practice.

    nursing candidates are no longer the homogenous group they were 30 years ago. some candidates are coming into nursing in mid-life with degrees in other disciplines and significant work experience. and every prospective nurse has different career aspirations, personal and family commitments, and work/life experience.

    i'm a big supporter of higher education and would encourage nurses to continue with their formal education. but whether a nurse gets that education at entry level or at a later time is an individual choice based on life circumstances, resources, and career aspirations."


    [font="garamond"]"i'm not afraid of storms, for i'm learning how to sail my ship."
    louisa may alcott quotes (american author known for her children's books, especially the classic little women. 1832-1888)

    ditto!!!!!:spin:
    guerrierdelion likes this.
  6. Visit  nurseontheway profile page
    0
    One of my close friends is an RN. She was just telling me that having your Associate degree or Bachelor's degree doesn't really matter when it comes to pay etc. The hospitals just want for you to have your license. She said that they are so desperate for nurses that they don't worry about your GPA either. The school that I am attending has an LPN program and after this you can go on to get your Associate RN degree (I don't know the exact terminology yet lol.) From my level of understanding it seems that if you want to further your education you have to have your Bachelor's? I am not worried about this right now and just want to make it through the first two steps/years.
  7. Visit  Hydakins profile page
    1
    In the state where I currently live, the BSN programs either have a terrible entrance process or a long waiting list. I chose a diploma program because the school is highly reputable. The universities and colleges mostly seem to have NCLEX passing rates in the 80s while the associate and diploma programs mostly have 99-100% passing rates. To me, a degree does not always equal and education. I chose the better program because becoming a competent nurse is my goal. I can and will go for my bachelors and masters degrees afterwards. I also live alone and the rent goes up every year (not to mention other bills), but my salary does not increase enough to keep me in a "safe zone". I need to make more money faster without having a large amount of money to pay back after I graduate. Also, many workplaces have tuition reimbursement and monetary incentives for continuing your education. Wherever I choose to work can help me to both: repay my current loan AND aid in paying for my schooling when I continue on. To me, it really boils down to the better education and the perks that come along in the future. Even if it takes me an extra year, it will help tokeep my out of pocket costs down in the future.
    purpleroseRN likes this.
  8. Visit  scooterRN52 profile page
    0
    Quote from Hydakins
    In the state where I currently live, the BSN programs either have a terrible entrance process or a long waiting list. I chose a diploma program because the school is highly reputable. The universities and colleges mostly seem to have NCLEX passing rates in the 80s while the associate and diploma programs mostly have 99-100% passing rates. To me, a degree does not always equal and education. I chose the better program because becoming a competent nurse is my goal. I can and will go for my bachelors and masters degrees afterwards. I also live alone and the rent goes up every year (not to mention other bills), but my salary does not increase enough to keep me in a "safe zone". I need to make more money faster without having a large amount of money to pay back after I graduate. Also, many workplaces have tuition reimbursement and monetary incentives for continuing your education. Wherever I choose to work can help me to both: repay my current loan AND aid in paying for my schooling when I continue on. To me, it really boils down to the better education and the perks that come along in the future. Even if it takes me an extra year, it will help tokeep my out of pocket costs down in the future.
    I have an ADN and higher pas scores have always been prevalent!!!1
  9. Visit  zenman profile page
    0
    Quote from Hydakins
    In the state where I currently live, the BSN programs either have a terrible entrance process or a long waiting list. I chose a diploma program because the school is highly reputable. The universities and colleges mostly seem to have NCLEX passing rates in the 80s while the associate and diploma programs mostly have 99-100% passing rates. .
    One thing to consider is that some programs may be "teaching to pass standardized tests such as the NCLEX," something common in our educational system. My teacher wife refused to do it one year and her students beat all the others. Personally, I'm for throwing out GRE and all college entrance exams and just let people in and see how they do. In fact, revamp the entire system...:spin:
  10. Visit  Hydakins profile page
    0
    While that may be true in certain schools, we began clinical rotations at hospitals on the 2nd day of school. It is VERY hands-on. They are very much into teaching us how to become successful nurses as well as preparing us to pass the NCLEX. But I do understand what you are saying. It just depends on the school, which is why it is ALWAYS good to do thorough research before wasting money on application fees. Also keep in mind that just because a schools name is known, does not mean that ALL of its programs are the greatest. For example: Princeton Univ in NJ is really known for its law program but not for nursing.
  11. Visit  suzy253 profile page
    1
    Quote from Hydakins
    In the state where I currently live, the BSN programs either have a terrible entrance process or a long waiting list. I chose a diploma program because the school is highly reputable. The universities and colleges mostly seem to have NCLEX passing rates in the 80s while the associate and diploma programs mostly have 99-100% passing rates. To me, a degree does not always equal and education. I chose the better program because becoming a competent nurse is my goal. I can and will go for my bachelors and masters degrees afterwards. I also live alone and the rent goes up every year (not to mention other bills), but my salary does not increase enough to keep me in a "safe zone". I need to make more money faster without having a large amount of money to pay back after I graduate. Also, many workplaces have tuition reimbursement and monetary incentives for continuing your education. Wherever I choose to work can help me to both: repay my current loan AND aid in paying for my schooling when I continue on. To me, it really boils down to the better education and the perks that come along in the future. Even if it takes me an extra year, it will help tokeep my out of pocket costs down in the future.
    Good for you
    I'm a grad of a three-year diploma program and I can definitely say you will be very well prepared. The NCSBN has posted the NCLEX pass rates and diploma grads are #1. Good luck to you.
    Hydakins likes this.


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