BSN the only "professional"?? - page 2

Hi everyone!! I have a question. I have a AS in nursing (for the last 2 months, yeah!) and I took my son to an urgent care center for a sinus infection yesterday. I was talking with the intake... Read More

  1. by   CRNA2BKY
    The ANA is the certification agency for BSN programs. They have nothing to do with ADN programs. So they are just tooting their own horn to promote their own agency. Every company likes to say they are the best. But the fact is, any RN can be just as professional, whether they are have an ADN or a BSN. Both ADN and BSN's are held to the same standard of care, held to the same standards, hold the same bedside clinical jobs, give equal treatment to patients, and pass the same state board tests. So yes, both the ADN and BSN trained nurses are equally professional. PERIOD! The only difference is that if a nurse wants to go into management, research, or get a masters degree, a BSN is normally the way to go.
  2. by   Myxel67
    Quote from Tweety
    Very unprofessional of this professional nurse to say that.

    Some academia do indeed state that the definition of a "profession" does indeed mean BSN, among other things.

    Many people take that to mean that ADNs are unprofessional. But that's that what they are saying, they only are describe the meaning of a profession, not the adjective of what it means to be a "professional" acting person.

    This nurse was correct about one thing. It is the ANA's position that entry level into nursing be the BSN: http://www.nursingworld.org/pressrel/2000/pr0225b.htm

    Tweety,

    The press release at the above link was published in 2000. Note that the exam they say will be coming next year is still missing in 2007. Looks like they want to make the exam either more difficult or more comprehensive. Can you imagine the surge in postings from BSN's saying "Oh no, I think I failed after 586 questions! ........Just a thought.

    It may be the ANA's opinion that the professionsal nurse should have BSN. However it is not a reality.

    Part of Press Release

    Washington, D.C. - The American Nurses Association (ANA) Board of Directors reaffirmed its longstanding position that baccalaureate education should be the standard for entry into professional nursing practice. The reaffirmation follows on the heels of a recent decision by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), a subsidiary of the ANA, to offer a new certification exam for nurses who hold a bachelor's of science in nursing (BSN), and to offer the present exams to nurses who hold an associate degree or diploma.

    This new approach to certification provides an opportunity to distinguish between the nurse with a BSN who will earn a "board certified" credential and the nurse who holds an associate's degree or diploma, who will earn the "certified" designation. The new exams for BSNs, slated to be offered later this year, will be based on the results of the role delineation study currently underway, and will continue to validate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the BSN, associate degree and diploma graduate.

    Another thought: How would the new exams for BSNs "continue to validate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the BSN, associate degree and diploma graduate."? Does iit mean they might let us ASNs and diploma nurses take it too?
    Last edit by Myxel67 on May 24, '07
  3. by   justme1972
    OMG...I am all about having a BSN, but I cannot even believe that a nurse at Urgent Care had the nerve to say such a thing to your son, not to mention it is grossly inaccurate.

    I am so sorry that happened...I think her BSN went in and tickled her brain and it wasn't working that day
  4. by   WindyhillBSN
    I think I'd report her too. She shouldn't get away with that.
  5. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from rn/writer
    at least in part, professional is as professional does. treating a patient or their family member with disrespect doesn't qualify.

    this nurse is entitled to her opinion, but it is inexcusable that she would, a) bring it up at all in the course of a medical visit, and, b) that she would involve your son in such a discussion. for someone who appears to value being professional, she acted in a very unprofessional manner. please, let the administration at the urgent care center know that this happened. she needs someone to 'splain to her the meaning of professional behavior and the ettiquette of respectful patient care.
    :yeahthat:


    concur 100% with rn/writer....the pen is mightier than the sword


    online journal of issues in nursing 2002 has great series of articles on topic: entry into practice: is it relevant today?
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on May 24, '07
  6. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Actually this nurse was technically correct...not to hurt and feelings or anything.

    "In 1965, the ANA adopted a resolution proposing that minimum preparation for beginning professional practice should be a baccalaureate degree in nursing and that minimum preparation for technical practice should be an associate degree in nursing. The ANA's 1965 resolution also prompted the 1985 ANA statement adopting the titles of associate nurse (a nurse prepared in an associate degree program) and a professional nurse (a nurse possessing he baccalaureate degree in nursing)" (Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 45).

    "Initially developed in response to a nursing shortage, ADN education thrives today. Students pursing this degree attend a junior college for 2 years receiving college credit for all courses and clinical experience in nursing. The goal of this program is to prepare technical nurses who are capable of functioning as quality practitioners under the supervision of professional nurses" (Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 46).

    "The baccalaureate degree in nursing offers students full college or university education with a background in liberal arts. The programs are rigorous and provide students with credits for nursing courses and clinical experience in all areas of nursing practice. Baccalaureate degree programs in nursing emphasize community health, research, leadership, and management"(Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 46).



    Info taken from:
    Craven, R. F., & Hirnle, C. J. (2007). Fundamentals of nursing human health and function (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Bolded areas my emphases
  7. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    Actually this nurse was technically correct...not to hurt and feelings or anything.



    To me, it is irrelevant if she was correct or not. It was not the proper setting for that conversation.
  8. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from multicollinarity
    To me, it is irrelevant if she was correct or not. It was not the proper setting for that conversation.

    Which any true professional would recognize and refrain from doing...
  9. by   HeartsOpenWide
    [QUOTE=multicollinarity;2218793]To me, it is irrelevant if she was correct or not. It was not the proper setting for that conversation.[/]

    I am not saying that she picked the correct setting or time to say what she said, some people made comments that she was wrong all around (not just that she picked an inappropriate time to explain it)
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Which any true professional would recognize and refrain from doing...
    Yes. Isn't it ironic that she was being unprofessional while holding herself out to be the "professional" one?
  11. by   cardiacRN2006
    Yes, it is quite ironic.


    This is why I will never become a member of the ANA. Not now, and not when I get my BSN.
  12. by   Myxel67
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    Actually this nurse was technically correct...not to hurt and feelings or anything.

    "In 1965, the ANA adopted a resolution proposing that minimum preparation for beginning professional practice should be a baccalaureate degree in nursing and that minimum preparation for technical practice should be an associate degree in nursing. The ANA's 1965 resolution also prompted the 1985 ANA statement adopting the titles of associate nurse (a nurse prepared in an associate degree program) and a professional nurse (a nurse possessing he baccalaureate degree in nursing)" (Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 45).

    "Initially developed in response to a nursing shortage, ADN education thrives today. Students pursing this degree attend a junior college for 2 years receiving college credit for all courses and clinical experience in nursing. The goal of this program is to prepare technical nurses who are capable of functioning as quality practitioners under the supervision of professional nurses" (Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 46).

    "The baccalaureate degree in nursing offers students full college or university education with a background in liberal arts. The programs are rigorous and provide students with credits for nursing courses and clinical experience in all areas of nursing practice. Baccalaureate degree programs in nursing emphasize community health, research, leadership, and management"(Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 46).



    Info taken from:
    Craven, R. F., & Hirnle, C. J. (2007). Fundamentals of nursing human health and function (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Bolded areas my emphases


    Again, all of these things are proposals, opinions, positions. Nothing has been done to put these proposals, opinions, or positions into effect. The nursing profession is still regulated by the individual states (not the ANA). I am a registered nurse, not an associate nurse, not a professional nurse.
  13. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    Actually this nurse was technically correct...not to hurt and feelings or anything.

    "In 1965, the ANA adopted a resolution proposing that minimum preparation for beginning professional practice should be a baccalaureate degree in nursing and that minimum preparation for technical practice should be an associate degree in nursing. The ANA's 1965 resolution also prompted the 1985 ANA statement adopting the titles of associate nurse (a nurse prepared in an associate degree program) and a professional nurse (a nurse possessing he baccalaureate degree in nursing)" (Craven & Hirnle, 2007, 45).
    Actually, this nurse was not correct, technically or otherwise.

    The quote you are using here to support her "correctness" merely states that the ANA made a proposal....and in 1965, at that. In the 42 years since that proposal was made, it is still not fact.

    The nurse in question told a child, in front of his mother, that his mother was not a professional nurse. That nurse was completely INcorrect, as the license that mother holds is of a Registered Professional Nurse.

    Symantics aside, playing power games with a small patient's mother under the guise of "explaining" something to the child was completely out of line.

    I'd have her explain her "professional" conduct to the DON, personally.

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