BSN as entry into practice; why we decided against it. - page 24

by MunoRN

26,070 Views | 240 Comments

While hopefully avoiding stoking the ADN - BSN debate unnecessarily, I thought I'd share my experience with my state's consideration of BSN as entry into practice, as well as the BSN-in-10 initiative. About 3 years ago I sat... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    most people who are going to get a master's degree in nursing are going to be an NP or do something where they are paid MORE than a floor nurse, not less.
    *** All or most of the the dozens of RNs I have known who went to NP school took a pay cut to do it. They went for a better schedual, not more pay.
  2. 0
    [QUOTE=Ntheboat2;7063162]
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!


    You know, it's really ridiculous that just because someone doesn't agree on ONE particular issue (oh...like the ADN/BSN as entry into practice, for example) that every other topic has to be misconstrued, misinterpreted, have information omitted, etc. just to raise an argument even where there isn't one.
    Projecting.
  3. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** All or most of the the dozens of RNs I have known who went to NP school took a pay cut to do it. They went for a better schedual, not more pay.
    An initial pay cut but over five years it more than balances out. NP isn't about the money for most, it's about taking the next step.
  4. 0
    xxxxx
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Dec 8, '12
  5. 0
    Quote from sosweetrn
    I have my BSN. I think it varies across state boards and accreditation requirements but where I live all one needs is college level A&P courses (just 8 hours) and a good ACT score before entry into an ADN program. I personally feel like these schools focus more on building nursing skills while BSN programs focus more on the WHY we use these skills and evidence-based practices. The level of cpritical thinking is different. Both extremely difficult and both produce great nurses. The people in my class all passed NCLEX the first time, but a test has nothing to do with what kind of nurse a person will be. Honestly I would have gotten my ADN first if I would have decided on nursing as a career straight out of high school, but a higher degree is a personal choice. My facility pays just a dollar more per hour for a BSN..that's not much comparing the cost of education. Anyone can go back to school through online programs (my school offers a RN TO MSN PROGRAM no Bachelor's required) and can work while learning. Earning my BSN was expensive. I lived on student loans and a pt on campus job that was more stress than what it was worth. It would have been nice to have a good paying PRN job that actually enhanced my nursing education. There's nothing wrong with either program as entry level. One is not better than the other. They're different paths to the same end. The sky is the limit in this field for anyone starting out. I personally don't feel either superior or inferior to an ADN nurse.
    I couldn't have said it better. Too many skilled nurses, and not enough critical thinkers to save lives
  6. 2
    Quote from favflu
    I couldn't have said it better. Too many skilled nurses, and not enough critical thinkers to save lives
    yes, too many skilled nurses is clearly one of our profession's major problems....
    Dazglue and Orca like this.
  7. 3
    Quote from sosweetrn
    I personally feel like these schools focus more on building nursing skills while BSN programs focus more on the WHY we use these skills and evidence-based practices. The level of critical thinking is different.
    I've heard this for years from the BSN crowd, and I've gotta say, after teaching in both ADN and BSN programs and working with new grads from both ADN and BSN programs, I just don't see it. The ADN students I've taught, and the new ADN grads I've worked with, were just as good at critical thinking as the BSN students and new grads I've worked with (and, frankly, IMO, neither were as good at critical thinking or clinical skills as your average diploma grad). I think this whole "BSN programs teach superior critical thinking skills" is just something the pro-BSN crowd dreamed up to help strengthen their case that students should go to school longer and pay more money. I'm sure there are superior BSN programs where this is truly the case (just as there are superior ADN programs out there), but I can't help but believe that it's mostly hot air.
    tntrn, nursel56, and Orca like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    Most baristas already have a bachelor's degree? We're talking a coffee server, right?
    Maybe because their degree is in ancient language syntax or one of many other degrees that offer no employment opportunities.Great topic, Muno.
    nursel56 likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I think it's a shame after nurses have had to work so hard to be seen as a valuable member of the healthcare profession instead of "butt wipers" that nurses themselves would say something as ridiculous as, "I don't need a master's degree to wipe butts."That's sad if you think you're a glorified butt wiper. Where do you work that they would even pay an RN to be a butt wiper? They must be hard up.
    And where do you work if butt wiping isnt part of the nurses job? Our mother-baby unit is all rns, no aides, so we all wipe butts, every shift. (For the grammar police, i am on an iPad and getting to the extras is a pia, so i dont do it.)
  10. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    And where do you work if butt wiping isnt part of the nurses job? Our mother-baby unit is all rns, no aides, so we all wipe butts, every shift. (For the grammar police, i am on an iPad and getting to the extras is a pia, so i dont do it.)
    ARE YOU KIDDING?? I went into nursing 25 yrs ago for the POWER!! Monday thru Friday, 9 - 5, glam role, looking like a super model all the while.. Only hob-knobbing with the "beautiful people"... You mean there's sick people and dirty butts involved? I'm outta here!


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