BSN as entry into practice; why we decided against it. - page 21

by MunoRN

25,537 Views | 240 Comments

While hopefully avoiding stoking the ADN - BSN debate unnecessarily, I thought I'd share my experience with my state's consideration of BSN as entry into practice, as well as the BSN-in-10 initiative. About 3 years ago I sat... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from subee
    d-e-l-i-b-e-r-a-t-e-l-y deliberately
    f-a-c-t-u-a-l-l-y factually
    s-u-c-c-e-s-s-f-u-l-l-y successfully

    I do this not out of cattiness. Just to illustrate that a good education never hurt anyone..ANYONE.
    Spelling is important; especially when you're the teacher.
    I'm curious what you think the difference is? BSN program English dept prereq requirement is typically limited to just Eng 101, ASN programs also require Eng 101, what's the difference?
  2. 0
    Subee, mainly what I'm trying to identify what it is specifically that makes for such a discrepancy in education? There are two consortiums in my state where ASN and BSN students sit side by side in the same classes, the only difference are the electives the BSN students take to change their ASN into a BSN (birdwatching, basketweaving and the like). Is this what makes the Nursing education of these two students sitting the same class so different?
  3. 1
    Quote from nursel56
    Not sure if pressuring faculty to earn their doctoral degrees in the midst of a drastic faculty shortage is sensible either.
    *** How can we have a faculty shortage? We have too many nurses and too many nursing school. Seems to me that we have at least twice as many faculty as we should have.
    kabfighter likes this.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** How can we have a faculty shortage? We have too many nurses and too many nursing school. Seems to me that we have at least twice as many faculty as we should have.
    Because the nurse power groups don't believe we have too many nurses and nursing schools. They continue to speculate that there will be a gigantic exodus of nurses who've delayed retirement, a huge influx of people demanding medical care as a result of the ACA, and droves of aging baby boomers overloading the system.

    Should any of these things fail to materialize, thousands more new grads will not be able to find jobs but the Tri-Council ("an alliance between the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, and the National League for Nursing") still made this statement:

    "the Tri-Council is very concerned that diminishing the pipeline of future nurses may put the health of many Americans at risk, particularly those from rural and underserved communities, and leave our healthcare delivery system unprepared to meet the demand for essential nursing services." (bolding added)

    I guess it would then seem logical to them that we're facing a faculty shortage. as Geraldine "Polly" Bednash, executive director of the AACN stated in August of this year. Their view is that every person who can qualify for nursing school should be admitted to nursing school.

    "more than 76,000 qualified applicants were turned away, in large part because nursing schools didn't have enough professors. says nurses comprise the oldest workforce in the nation, and many of them kept working during the recession. They are going to leave in droves andare already leaving in some places where the economy is getting better."
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    Quote from nursel56
    Because the nurse power groups don't believe we have too many nurses and nursing schools. They continue to speculate that there will be a gigantic exodus of nurses who've delayed retirement, a huge influx of people demanding medical care as a result of the ACA, and droves of aging baby boomers overloading the system.

    Should any of these things fail to materialize, thousands more new grads will not be able to find jobs but the Tri-Council ("an alliance between the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, and the National League for Nursing") still made this statement:

    "the Tri-Council is very concerned that diminishing the pipeline of future nurses may put the health of many Americans at risk, particularly those from rural and underserved communities, and leave our healthcare delivery system unprepared to meet the demand for essential nursing services." (bolding added)

    I guess it would then seem logical to them that we're facing a faculty shortage. as Geraldine "Polly" Bednash, executive director of the AACN stated in August of this year. Their view is that every person who can qualify for nursing school should be admitted to nursing school.

    "more than 76,000 qualified applicants were turned away, in large part because nursing schools didn't have enough professors. says nurses comprise the oldest workforce in the nation, and many of them kept working during the recession. They are going to leave in droves andare already leaving in some places where the economy is getting better."
    *** Thus adding more evidence that those groups are not on the side of nurses. Plus it looks like they are buying into thier own propaganda. Always a bad sign.
    One of the only valid reason I have ever heard for BSN only entry to RN practice (didn' hear it here) is to actually make real the fake nursing shortage, thus increasing wages and other benifits for nurses. A least until a mass of BSN prepared RNs from the Phillipines, India, Africa and other countries can be imported.
    nursel56 and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
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    Too many of what kind of nurses? ADN? Too many of what kind of nursing schools? ADN?

    There's a difference in "shortage of nurses" and "shortage of faculty."

    The main difference being a Master's degree. I have never, ever heard anybody say there is too much nursing faculty.
  7. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    Too many of what kind of nurses? ADN? Too many of what kind of nursing schools? ADN?

    There's a difference in "shortage of nurses" and "shortage of faculty."

    The main difference being a Master's degree. I have never, ever heard anybody say there is too much nursing faculty.
    What kind of nurses? RNs and LPNs. Not enough difference between ADN and BSN RNs to seperate them into different groups.
    There isn't a shortage of either nurses or nursing faculty. Many open and unfilled positions for faculty is no indicator of a shorage. Plenty of graduate degree prepared nurses around but a lot of them don't wish to take the pay cut teaching would mean. I don't blame them. Plenty of RNs with MSNs and docorate degrees working as bedside RNs. All you have to do to get plenty of faculty is to pay them enough.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Dec 7, '12
  8. 2
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I think it's a shame after nurses have had to work so hard to be seen as a valuable member of the healthcare profession instead of "butt wipers" that nurses themselves would say something as ridiculous as, "I don't need a master's degree to wipe butts."

    That's sad if you think you're a glorified butt wiper. Where do you work that they would even pay an RN to be a butt wiper? They must be hard up.
    Who do you think wipes them when the CNA's are cut?
    tntrn and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from tokmom
    Who do you think wipes them when the CNA's are cut?
    *** Every ICU I have ever worked in did primary nursing. There may or may not be CNAs in the unit. If there is there are helpers and don't bath or clean up patients by themselves, at least not in my experience. You have to cut Ntheboat2 a little slack s/he is either not a nurse or a brand new nurse and doesn't yet realize what the real nursing world is like.
    tokmom likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    Who do you think wipes them when the CNA's are cut?
    Did you even read what I said?

    When did I ever say anything even close to, "Nurses don't wipe butts."

    I said it is sad if you think RN = butt wiper.

    Out of all the things nurses do, butt wiping is near the bottom of the totem pole.

    "Butt wiper" is typically how an uneducated non-nurse views a nurse.

    Random person: "What did you go to school for?"
    Nurse: "Oh, I went to school for nursing. I'm an RN."
    Random person: "Oh, so you're a butt wiper."

    Seriously? I think it's pitiful if a CNA even labels themselves as a butt wiper, but an RN saying "Who needs one of them there edumications to wipe ace?!" is just ignorant and doesn't help the misconception that nurses are just "overpaid butt wipers."


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