BSN as entry into practice; why we decided against it. - page 20

by MunoRN

25,098 Views | 240 Comments

While hopefully avoiding stoking the ADN - BSN debate unnecessarily, I thought I'd share my experience with my state's consideration of BSN as entry into practice, as well as the BSN-in-10 initiative. About 3 years ago I sat... Read More


  1. 4
    Why do we not just require PhD's for all nurses? Then we could be addressed as "Doctor Nurse..."

    Seriously, it looks like some in Nursing are really trying to do some serious damage to the profession by requiring advanced degrees. Must be (at least where they are employed) there is a glut of nurses that will continue for the coming decades. When those calls for such requirements come from the "educators", a conclusion can be easily drawn.
  2. 0
    Quote from subee
    I don't think I ever implied that it wasn't a good idea. I'm just saying that it's not going to save anyone money because they're taking the same number of credits.
    Depends on weather they can get a job after graduation. If they got a job in my hospital it would save them at least $65K in wages that would not be lost working the fourth years rather than being in school. In addition I would think it would save money barrowed for living expences, at least $25%.
  3. 0
    To be a substitute teacher, they need a bachelor's degree. To teach as a licensed professional they are mandated to have a master' degree. This should be in all 50 states. In my opinion, there's no excuse for higher education in nursing, to improve critical thinking and evidence-based practice
  4. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Ya the problem with this statement is not only is it (deliberatly I am sure) insulting, but factualy inaccurate. I am an instructor in a hospital's Critical Care Nurse Residency Program. We hire both ADNs and BSN grads into the residency. We have been doing this for since 2005. Some graduate and make competent ICU nurses and some don't. We have been unable to predict who will and who will not be able to complete the high pressure program and be sucsesseful critical care nurses based on the nursing degree they come to us with. We have noticed that older grads with more life experience do better. The ADN grads tend to be older, as do the accelerated BSN grads. The traditional BSN grads have the highest drop out rate. Also BSN grads have the lowest number of completed contracts. For that reason BSN grads are no longer hired into the residency for the SICU, though they still are for PICU, NICU, MICU, ER & PACU.



    *** Well you are certainly entiteled to your opinion.
    d-e-l-i-b-e-r-a-t-e-l-y deliberately
    f-a-c-t-u-a-l-l-y factually
    s-u-c-c-e-s-s-f-u-l-l-y successfully

    I do this not out of cattiness. Just to illustrate that a good education never hurt anyone..ANYONE.
    Spelling is important; especially when you're the teacher.
  5. 0
    Sigh......
  6. 3
    Quote from subee
    d-e-l-i-b-e-r-a-t-e-l-y deliberately
    f-a-c-t-u-a-l-l-y factually
    s-u-c-c-e-s-s-f-u-l-l-y successfully

    I do this not out of cattiness. Just to illustrate that a good education never hurt anyone..ANYONE.
    Spelling is important; especially when you're the teacher.
    *** Ya I can't spell. I have dyslexia, didn't learn to read until I was 11 (I remember my teacher telling my mom "he's just to dumb to learn to read") and no spell check on my phone. Also huge hands that make typing on anything other than a full sized keyboard difficult. I am also a graduate of a well respected state university BSN program.
    I don't teach spelling, I teach hemodynamics, gtts, and a couple other subjects. Once again I can't spell, I know that, in addition my huge fingers make typos common. I deal with it.
    Now any comments on the content of my message?
    tntrn, redhead_NURSE98!, and tokmom like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from favflu
    To be a substitute teacher, they need a bachelor's degree. To teach as a licensed professional they are mandated to have a master' degree. This should be in all 50 states. In my opinion, there's no excuse for higher education in nursing, to improve critical thinking and evidence-based practice
    What is the evidence that ADN RNs have less critical thinking skills than nurses with BSN? How is that measured? Why and how would requiring BSNs improve EBP?
    tntrn and PRICHARILLAisMISSED like this.
  8. 4
    Quote from favflu
    In my opinion, there's no excuse for higher education in nursing, to improve critical thinking and evidence-based practice
    Oh yeah because the Advanced Birdwatching class my friend's kid is taking in her BSN program is really going to increase her critical thinking skills. I'm not kidding.
    tntrn, redhead_NURSE98!, tokmom, and 1 other like this.
  9. 0
    I think it's a shame after nurses have had to work so hard to be seen as a valuable member of the healthcare profession instead of "butt wipers" that nurses themselves would say something as ridiculous as, "I don't need a master's degree to wipe butts."

    That's sad if you think you're a glorified butt wiper. Where do you work that they would even pay an RN to be a butt wiper? They must be hard up.
  10. 2
    Quote from Overland1
    Why do we not just require PhD's for all nurses? Then we could be addressed as "Doctor Nurse..."

    Seriously, it looks like some in Nursing are really trying to do some serious damage to the profession by requiring advanced degrees. Must be (at least where they are employed) there is a glut of nurses that will continue for the coming decades. When those calls for such requirements come from the "educators", a conclusion can be easily drawn.
    What they "call for" is a shell game they can change with the winds anytime they see fit because 1) they have a lock on the media due to reporters being lazy and accepting their talking points as "truth" and 2) nobody holds them accountable for their inconsistencies or record of failure on 100% of their past predictions.

    You will still hear the old talking points and the ossified thinking patterns in the rank and file of faculty (thank God it's not the faculty who post regularly here) who I guess figure their degree exempts them from thoughfully reading through a thread before depositing a rash and insulting series of comments.

    Right now, for example, they have backed off current nursing shortage for the most part and are running around attempting to scare people about the coming epic catastrophe shortage that's supposed to arrive around 2020. It was scheduled to arrive in 2010 but then they discovered several hundred thousand young female nurses graduating between 2005 and 2009 they hadn't noticed before.

    Not sure if pressuring faculty to earn their doctoral degrees in the midst of a drastic faculty shortage is sensible either.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Dec 7, '12 : Reason: removed quote not relevant
    redhead_NURSE98! and PMFB-RN like this.


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