BSN as entry into practice; why we decided against it. - page 18

While hopefully avoiding stoking the ADN - BSN debate unnecessarily, I thought I'd share my experience with my state's consideration of BSN as entry into practice, as well as the BSN-in-10 initiative. About 3 years ago I sat... Read More

  1. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Here in Wisconsin the public ADN programs are 1 plus 1. That means that after a student finishes the first year of the ADN program they are eligible to take the NCLEX-LPN. Most will do so and then work full time over the summer as LPNs and then continue part time LPN during the last two semesters of the nursing program. So it is not unusual at all for a brand new ADN RN to have nearly a year of LPN experience.
    I went to nursing school in Wisconsin and that is exactly what I did.

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  2. 0
    Quote from MunoRN

    We also have 3 year BSN programs, Chaplain college offers one, it's 1 year of pre-reqs (A&P, micro, Psych, math, etc) and 2 years of the program. Of course this is completely different from an ADN program, which is 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program.

    Saying a BSN is better than an ADN doesn't make as much sense when you put it another way; 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program is better than 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program.

    Of course Chamberlain's program isn't exactly the same as ADN programs; it costs $85,000.

    85k for a nursing degree? That is just, wow. I think a majority of the students who decide to go there is because they couldn't make it into a regular college that costs significantly less because of the long waiting lists.... Then again I hear there is no ”waiting list” because most schools select students with the highest gpa. Anyone with a 2.5, even a 3.0 ”waiting” for entrance is just wasting their time.
  3. 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    I did not say that "only hospitals affiliated with BSN granting Universities prefer BSNs", I stated that if you intend on working at an academic hospital, then a BSN is definitely worthwhile. This varies from area to area, it's not really accurate to take a characteristics specific to a local area and generalize it to the entire country. What RN's in your area and what RN's in my area experience might be very different.

    Conspiracy theories are ideas that are unproven and often seem far fetched. The idea that Universities see some benefit in increasing demand for their own product came from the Dean of a local BSN program, not some paranoid delusion. While we're on the subject of conspiracy theories though, we recently had a large consulting group come through. They identified that we could save money by increasing RN FTE's, and suggested one way of doing this was to hire more BSN's, as they often need to make more money due to higher loan amounts.

    In major urban centers, where most if not all hospitals have some sort of affiliation with a University, you will benefit from a BSN, however not all Nurses intend on working in major Urban centers.

    It's important to understand the motivations of many (but not all) employers who require or prefer BSN's as this has been seen by many as a sign that all employers see significant differences in ADN and BSN graduates, and therefore it only makes sense to do away with ADN programs. Understanding the reasoning behind this demand helps us make more appropriate decisions in how we manage our profession.

    So if it's up to you, how would you change Nursing education?
    Was the consulting firm Stroudwater, by any chance?
  4. 3
    Quote from anniv91106
    Was the consulting firm Stroudwater, by any chance?
    Huron consulting group. It's what's left of Arthur Andersen (the Arthur Andersen execs that avoided jailtime as a result of Enron started Huron consulting). Seems like a great group of people to take business advice from right?
    elkpark, tokmom, and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    We also have 3 year BSN programs, Chaplain college offers one, it's 1 year of pre-reqs (A&P, micro, Psych, math, etc) and 2 years of the program. Of course this is completely different from an ADN program, which is 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program.

    Saying a BSN is better than an ADN doesn't make as much sense when you put it another way; 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program is better than 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of program.


    Of course Chamberlain's program isn't exactly the same as ADN programs; it costs $85,000.
    I googled Champlain College nursing and came up with a Champlain College in Canada with a pre-nursing program but no nursing degree. There is a Champlain College in Burlington, Vt. but no nursing program. So ?where is this 3-year BSN program? Unless the students go year around or transfer a year's credits to a 4 year program, I don't believe it until I see it.
  6. 0
    Quote from subee
    I googled Champlain College nursing and came up with a Champlain College in Canada with a pre-nursing program but no nursing degree. There is a Champlain College in Burlington, Vt. but no nursing program. So ?where is this 3-year BSN program? Unless the students go year around or transfer a year's credits to a 4 year program, I don't believe it until I see it.
    3-Year Bachelor of Science in Nursing

    Chamberlain College of Nursing's Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program enables students to earn their BSN degree in as few as three years of year-round study instead of the typical four years with summers off, allowing students to enter the workforce sooner than their peers at other higher education institutions. The CCNE-accredited* BSN degree program is available at 12 locations across the country, each featuring high-tech nursing labs and experienced faculty.

    BSN Degree Locations
    Arizona - Phoenix, Arizona
    Florida - Jacksonville, Florida
    Florida - Miramar, Florida
    Georgia - Atlanta, Georgia
    Illinois - Addison, Illinois
    Illinois - Chicago, Illinois
    Indiana - Indianapolis, Indiana
    Missouri - St. Louis, Missouri
    Ohio - Cleveland, Ohio
    Ohio - Columbus, Ohio
    Texas - Houston, Texas
    Virginia - Arlington, Virginia

    Chamberlain College of Nursing's Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program enables students to earn their BSN degree in as few as three years of year-round study instead of the typical four years.
  7. 0
    OK, your "3" years is a little disingenuous because you're cramming the same 120 or so credits into a shorter time span, but spend the same amount of time in school and pay the full credit load. Most people probably are graduating to unemployment.
  8. 2
    Quote from subee
    OK, your "3" years is a little disingenuous because you're cramming the same 120 or so credits into a shorter time span, but spend the same amount of time in school and pay the full credit load. Most people probably are graduating to unemployment.
    Lots of students would love to "cram" a BSN into 3 years. Why not? You say yourself they get the same credit hours. So why would they be less like to land a job? Many of us are quite capable of juggling our time and of taking on a demanding, full school schedule. I went to a PN program that was Monday through Friday 8am to 5pm. I also worked full time third shift. I passed with a 3.8 GPA. I'm confused as to why you think condensing a BSN into 3 years is an undesirable and/or unrealistic thing.
    Skips and nursel56 like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Lots of students would love to "cram" a BSN into 3 years. Why not? You say yourself they get the same credit hours. So why would they be less like to land a job? Many of us are quite capable of juggling our time and of taking on a demanding, full school schedule. I went to a PN program that was Monday through Friday 8am to 5pm. I also worked full time third shift. I passed with a 3.8 GPA. I'm confused as to why you think condensing a BSN into 3 years is an undesirable and/or unrealistic thing.
    Agree with this. I've been thinking that the whole concept of chronological time for a program is heading in the direction of obsolete. The reason would be that when we're talking about nursing education, there is a rapid proliferation of combinations possible between online, brick and mortar, "accelerated" degree programs, eligibility to sit for the NCLEX-PN partway through an RN program and many others. When you throw the variation and differences in general ed and prerequisite requirements schools offer for the same degree, it doesn't make sense to argue between 18 months and 2 years, or 3 and 4 years, etc.
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  10. 0
    Right, if the end result is the same, who cares the path taken to get there.

    And, really, a BSN grad who's draaaaaged their education over 6 years or so is less prepared to hit the floor than a grad with the *same* amount of credits who condensed it into half the time.


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