Which is better RN cert. from a community college or BSN - page 3

by wchelsea

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I am getting a little confused on what to do. I already have a BS, but would like to become a nurse. What is the difference in going to a community college and getting a RN Certificate through them and going to a University and... Read More


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    Let me clarify that last point I made. As I re-read it I realized how it may have sounded. Now, bear in mind that I'm one of those crazy people that thinks a bachelor's degree is more than enough for everything. Medical school should be a bachelor's degree. In my mind the PhD should be the only doctorate level degree. But that's just not how this country is. Everyone has to be a doctor now. Everyone has to have a million degrees. Especially healthcare. It's a bit ridiculous really - MD, PharmD, DPT, OD, DO, AuD... even a Doctorate in Physician Assistant Studies. So, unfortunately, nursing is left in a pretty precarious position. Can anyone here honestly say that many of the degree/career paths listed above are responsible for as much as the bedside nurse? And yet they are "doctors" and we are diplomas and associate degrees. It's a bizarre hierarchy in the hospital and as far as education goes, we are on the bottom. Pharm techs and lab assistants have as much education as the RN. We need to (unfortunately) raise the bar.
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    I also had a bachelors in psych and I went to a community college a semester later and got my ADN may 2012. I did it that way because I was on my own, own apt, paying for my car, parents were no financial help to me whatsoever. I had to do the practical thing and the quickest thing for me to get on my feet. If I had the financial support, I would have either gone for my BSN at a cheaper college and hope that most of my credits transferred, or did a MSN bridge program. I have found that many nursing job postings will say "Bachelors preferred" even bachelors required. You could also get your ADN and sometimes schools will help you get your BSN with just a few more online classes. If you have the support, I would say go for the BSN.
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    Many community colleges have excellent nursing programs. In the urban areas on the East Coast right now, there are a number of new grads without jobs. I see a lot of BSN only jobs posted for bedside entry level, cargivers. Right or wrong, hospitals view the BSN grad as "better." Whether or not that is reality is a matter of debate. I am an ADN grad who got an excellent and very reasonably priced education BUT I would have to say if you can get the BSN pretty quickly, then do that.
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    I want to go the asn route and then apply for rn to bsn right after
    Godivadess likes this.
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    I've gone the ADN route myself (will graduate in May, yesssss!) because of several factors. One for me was money. As I get a full Pell grant tuition and books were totally covered throughout the program for me at the CC, and I couldn't really afford a BSN program. I also like the amount of clinical hours we get in our ADN program compared to the BSN programs in the area. With those factors, combined with the fact that ADNs generally don't have a hard time getting hired as long as they commit to getting their BSN within 5 years or so, so the hospital can maintain magnet status, I went with my ADN.
    Godivadess and mee9mee9 like this.
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    For myself I start off with a ADN but I am currently in a BSN program. I would have still had 2 years of nursing school regardless of the route I took. I did not have anyone to talk with about nursing and all I saw was ADN was cheaper. If I could do it over again I would have gotten my BSN and now I would be getting my MSN. A LOT of places only hire BSN nurses. Being a new grad with a ADN it could be hard to find I job. I work for a magnet hospital and they really push for BSN nursing and higher but they will pay for everything so it's a win. Good luck!
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    Hello JottRN I'm soon to be moving to Little Rock, AR wanted to know if you could please provide me with information on the school you attended and your online program for your BSN. Im new to this site and dont know if it's a place to check messages here but could you please send it to my personal email gabbywicks@yahoo.com thanks
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    Hello JottRN I'm soon to be moving to Little Rock, AR wanted to know if you could please provide me with information on the school you attended and your online program for your BSN. Im new to this site and dont know if it's a place to check messages here but could you please send it to my personal email gabbywicks@yahoo.com thanks
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    I am enrolled in an ADN program. I am a brand new nursing student with a previous Bachelor degree in Physics. I have also heard that ADNs are having a hard time getting their first RN jobs over BSNs. I've also heard that the job market varied by state or by local community even. But somehow that seems to conflict with what I am seeing posted on job sites. All they ask for are RN license. It wouldn't change my decision about where I attend school (a local and highly respected community college) but just makes me motivated to jump on a RN to BSN program as soon as possible after graduation - maybe even RN-MSN as I work. I am also a mom of three kids and married. I know it will be hard. Any words of advice?
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    Quote from Godivadess
    I am enrolled in an ADN program. I am a brand new nursing student with a previous Bachelor degree in Physics. I have also heard that ADNs are having a hard time getting their first RN jobs over BSNs. I've also heard that the job market varied by state or by local community even. But somehow that seems to conflict with what I am seeing posted on job sites. All they ask for are RN license. It wouldn't change my decision about where I attend school (a local and highly respected community college) but just makes me motivated to jump on a RN to BSN program as soon as possible after graduation - maybe even RN-MSN as I work. I am also a mom of three kids and married. I know it will be hard. Any words of advice?
    My background was similar (previous bachelor and master's degrees), went the ADN route and then RN-BSN. At community college, I was in the evening/weekend nursing program and most of had full-time day jobs (in my case, I was working 50 - 60 hrs/wk). All of us made it through and all but one of us passed the NCLEX on the first try. Many of my classmates also went on to get their BSN's. While this didn't help in my case - I continue to work outside of health care - it has helped many of my classmates to get (or keep) hospital nursing jobs.

    The job market for new grads varies widely across the country but in many places, it is very difficult for new grads to find nursing jobs. My CC has one of the oldest and most well-regarded ADN programs in the country and in years past, its graduates were highly sought after. That has changed now with nearly all hospitals in the area hiring only BSN's. Most of my classmates struggled to find jobs even in LTC. Even with a BSN however, it is difficult for new grads. Your area may be different but this is something worth looking into prior to investing the time, money and energy into getting a nursing degree.

    Best of luck to you.


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