Becoming a RN after high school

  1. 0 These questions might sound really "stupid," and I'm not even sure I'm wording this correctly, but I really want to know:
    1. What is a BSN (in reference to a RN)?
    1. Is it better to attend a two-year community college and get my ADN, or is it better to attend a four-year college and get my BSN?
    2. Is it true that I can become a RN with a BSN in about four years right after high school?
    3. Can I become a PA (hopefully with a PhD) after I get my BSN?
    4. Last but not least, What are the (close to exact) steps I should follow right after or during high school in order to get my BSN?
    Thank you so much!
  2. Visit  vvikhrev profile page

    About vvikhrev

    Joined May '13; Posts: 1.

    40 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  ChristineN profile page
    0
    Quote from vvikhrev
    These questions might sound really "stupid," and I'm not even sure I'm wording this correctly, but I really want to know:
    1. What is a BSN (in reference to a RN)?
    1. Is it better to attend a two-year community college and get my ADN, or is it better to attend a four-year college and get my BSN?
    2. Is it true that I can become a RN with a BSN in about four years right after high school?
    3. Can I become a PA (hopefully with a PhD) after I get my BSN?
    4. Last but not least, What are the (close to exact) steps I should follow right after or during high school in order to get my BSN?
    Thank you so much!
    1. A BSN is a 4 year RN program.
    2. Depends. If you can afford to go straight for your BSN and that will work for you in your life now I would do that. If you do an ADN then you should look into RN-BSN programs for after
    3. PA's don't have PhD's. Also, have you looked into NP programs? Being an NP would build on your nursing education. Plus NP's have full autonomy in some states, compared to PA's which require physician supervision in all states.
    4. You should apply to 4 year colleges that have nursing programs. Start looking now to see their admission requirements. Most schools will require a good GPA, and science classes on your high school transcript (ie. Chemistry, biology, and algebra). Some schools may require ACT/SAT or other pre-entrance exams.
  4. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
    0
    1. BSN is the degree, RN is the title. There are two ways to become an RN in the US.One is an ASN (2 year Associates degree) or a BSN ( 4 year degree).

    1.That is the never ending debate.ASN is quicker and you could work while you do the bridge to BSN. Some say that if you have the time and money and you can swing it then going straight to the BSN is the best. It depends on the job market where you live. In many areas you can still find work with an ASN but in some places employers are asking for BSN only in increasing numbers.
    Everyone has differing opinions on this one.Sometimes the huge wait lists for nursing programs are a big problem. Some start off my becoming LPNs and then bridging to BSN.

    2. Roughly 4 years but it can take much longer depending on how long it takes you to complete the prerequisites and then again how long it takes you to get into a program after finishing them.

    3. I don't know but I am sure that someone will come along that does.

    4. You would need to pick a program and then complete the prerequisites.Nursing programs are very competitive and many have waiting lists so getting can take some time.
  5. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    A PA program is a Master's level program. Yes, after you get your BSN, I see no reason why you couldn't get into a PA school. I'm sure you *could* go on to get your PhD afterwards, but a doctorate is not awarded when you finish PA school.
  6. Visit  nurseprice profile page
    0
    very simple.

    1) BSN is bachelors science of nursing DEGREE, received from a 4 year college. ADN is associates degree of nursing, received from a community college ( a 2year program AFTER prereqs are complete. which will end up being about 4 years not including waiting lists )

    2) RN's who have their ADN get paid a few dollars less than the ones who have their BSN. there is a longer waiting list for the ADN program because anyone can enroll in a community college rather than a university where you'd receive a BSN.
    RN's with a BSN can get promoted much higher than one with an ADN which all in all mean better job opportunities.

    3) as a high school graduate, you can enroll in community college, after 2 years of pre'reqs transfer and then do your RN BSN program. so yeas, in 4 years as long as you work hard and willing to do summer and winter school. not easy.

    4) PA is not in the range of RN's they are closer to doctors so after your BSN, you'd have to do a separate program ( i dont know them ) to do the PA. usually, RN's with a BSN get their masters (MSN) and become nurse practitioners. which make good money as well..
    if you're looking into PA, gothe route of becoming a doctor rather than RN. do research on how to become a PA, i am unaware,

    5) if you arent accepted into a university straight from high school then take these steps.
    do research to see how to become a PA, talk to communnity college counselor
    or become a NP
    2 year community college in pre'reqs
    transfer and do 2years in RN BSN program.
    no point in doing ADN when you are trying to become a PA or nurse practitioner ( NP), thats an extra unnecessary step.
    study hard, get BSN
    get MSN, nurse practitioner course. i believe 2 years to get
  7. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from klone
    A PA program is a Master's level program. Yes, after you get your BSN, I see no reason why you couldn't get into a PA school. I'm sure you *could* go on to get your PhD afterwards, but a doctorate is not awarded when you finish PA school.
    *** Or PA is an associates degree program, or a bachelors degree program. To the OP. If you want to go to PA school then you should work in that direction. If you want to be a nurse you should work in that direction.
    Yes you can get a BSN in 4 years after high school if you can be admitted to a college with a nursing program. if you are going from high school then a BSN program would be best for you. Earning a BSN qualfies you to take the state board exam called NCLEX. if you pass that you will be an RN.
    A BSN is a Bachelors of science degree in nursing (a nursing degree). Like other bachelors degrees it can be earned at a variety of colleges and universities. Either a bachelors degree in nursing (BSN) or another nursing degree (ADN or MSN) from a basic nursing program is required to be elligable to sit for the NCLEX.
    KelRN215 likes this.
  8. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    3
    Quote from nurseprice
    very simple.

    ..... *snipped*......

    2) RN's who have their ADN get paid a few dollars less than the ones who have their BSN. there is a longer waiting list for the ADN program because anyone can enroll in a community college rather than a university where you'd receive a BSN.
    RN's with a BSN can get promoted much higher than one with an ADN which all in all mean better job opportunities.
    ......
    I believe you should check your facts before advising anyone.

    "RNs who have an ADN get paid a few dollars less than ones who have a BSN". Really? What's your reference? That's news to all the ADNs who get paid the same wage or, in some cases, 50 cents an hour less (or, when talking about charge and specialty positions---MORE). While the hiring preference *may* be a BSN over an ADN, normally the wages aren't very dissimilar....certainly not as much as you profess.

    "there is a longer waiting list for the ADN program because anyone can enroll in a community college rather than a university where you'd receive a BSN". Anyone? That would come as a surprise to all those who needed a 4.0 to get into community college, but could get into a private university with a 2.8. Standards vary greatly. For-profit schools tend to have the least requirements but cost the most. As the tuition/total cost goes down, the standards for admission tend to go up, at least when we're talking about nursing programs. More competition for lower tuition=higher standards. The wait lists are also longer at community colleges because they better accommodate non-traditional students (older, with families, jobs, etc) than traditional (dorm-based) universities do.

    As for promotion opportunities, this will vary considerably as well. While I absolutely encourage anyone who is able to get a BSN (I'm much in favor of advancing one's education), it is not always as required for job promotion as students are taught. Much depends on the facility, the position, and the experience of the person applying.

    I know I answered a post of yours on a thread you started in which you were asking a basic question about the NCLEX (you clearly had misunderstood the info you'd gotten somewhere). You are a student now? Please be careful of spreading misinformation to others. It's rampant on these boards as it is!
    Last edit by RNsRWe on May 15, '13 : Reason: typo noticed
    Lennonninja, courtney,rn, and PMFB-RN like this.
  9. Visit  libran1984 profile page
    1
    RNsRWe: preach the truth sistah!!!
    RNsRWe likes this.
  10. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    2) RN's who have their ADN get paid a few dollars less than the ones who have their BSN. there is a longer waiting list for the ADN program because anyone can enroll in a community college rather than a university where you'd receive a BSN.
    RN's with a BSN can get promoted much higher than one with an ADN which all in all mean better job opportunities.
    *** Actually none of the above is correct.

    3) as a high school graduate, you can enroll in community college, after 2 years of pre'reqs transfer and then do your RN BSN program. so yeas, in 4 years as long as you work hard and willing to do summer and winter school. not easy.
    *** No she can not do 2 years of pre-reqs and then do an RN BSN program. RN BSN programs are for people who are already RNs.

    no point in doing ADN when you are trying to become a PA or nurse practitioner ( NP), thats an extra unnecessary step.
    *** Actually since there are a number of RN to MSN NP program that do not require a BSN one could argue that the BSN is an unnecessary step.
  11. Visit  carolinapooh profile page
    1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Or PA is an associates degree program, or a bachelors degree program. To the OP. If you want to go to PA school then you should work in that direction. If you want to be a nurse you should work in that direction.
    Yes you can get a BSN in 4 years after high school if you can be admitted to a college with a nursing program. if you are going from high school then a BSN program would be best for you. Earning a BSN qualfies you to take the state board exam called NCLEX. if you pass that you will be an RN.
    A BSN is a Bachelors of science degree in nursing (a nursing degree). Like other bachelors degrees it can be earned at a variety of colleges and universities. Either a bachelors degree in nursing (BSN) or another nursing degree (ADN or MSN) from a basic nursing program is required to be elligable to sit for the NCLEX.
    A Physician Assistant (PA-C) degree is no less than an MS; a PHYSICIAN'S ASSISTANT - a completely different title - can be an AS or just a certificate. A PA-C will never have a terminal degree below the graduate level - it simply doesn't exist.

    You can have a diploma from an accredited school of nursing and sit the NCLEX. A diploma of nursing is not a degree per se.

    If you are going from high school you should research every type of program, weigh your options, CALCULATE YOUR BUDGET, and then determine which option is truly best for you.
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  12. Visit  carolinapooh profile page
    1
    Quote from RNsRWe
    For-profit schools tend to have the least requirements but cost the most.
    As a graduate of a well-known, private university (and no university/accredited college is for-profit by definition) with a nationally-ranked nursing program in the top 10 in the country, this statement bothers me - my assumption is you're meaning for-profit technical schools, like ECPI.

    I'm not being a snob here, but places like Yale, Vanderbilt, and Duke all have stringent requirements for entry, are definitely private, and actually hand out more scholarship, grant, and need-based financial aid monies than public colleges and universities simply because they can.

    In fact, generally an applicant will receive more aid from a private college/university than a public one, because demonstrated need is obviously greater. That's one reason I went private: I got grants and need-based aid that no public institution would grant, and my out of pocket costs were considerably lower.

    Not all of us who go private have daddies who build libraries on campus after we graduate as a tribute to his offspring.

    Sorry - that just bugged me.
    KelRN215 likes this.
  13. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    A Physician Assistant (PA-C) degree is no less than an MS; a PHYSICIAN'S ASSISTANT - a completely different title - can be an AS or just a certificate. A PA-C will never have a terminal degree below the graduate level - it simply doesn't exist.
    *** Really? What exactly is a "PHYSICIAN'S ASSISTANT"? I have never heard of such a thing. How are they different than a "Physician Assistant (PA-C)"?
    How do you account for the associates degree Physician Assistant programs that exist?

    You can have a diploma from an accredited school of nursing and sit the NCLEX. A diploma of nursing is not a degree per se.
    *** Obviously. Is there some debate about this?
  14. Visit  libran1984 profile page
    0
    Here is a decent thread regarding...

    Associate degree PA-C's
    Bachelor degree PA-C's
    And then Masters.

    physicianassistantforum.com/forums/showthread.php/24746-Associate-Degree-programs-viability
    Last edit by Esme12 on May 18, '13 : Reason: TOS/removed link

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