Associates or Bachelors? - page 6

Can anyone tell me the major differences between an associates degree and a bachelors degree? I realize the bachelors requires more schooling and more job opportunities. Jobwise is what I mean. ... Read More

  1. by   xtxrn
    I'm sure it's possible, but with clinical hours, and needing to work 40 hours between Fri-Sun (3-11 & 11-7 doubles on Fri & Sat, and 3-11 on Sun), I needed to get pre-reqs done ahead of time. A lot of my classmates ended up doing it in 3 years because of family issues. I'm sure it's all been done in 2 years for those who had the time to combine nursing with science/English/sociology/psych classes.... kudos to you for getting it all done quickly
  2. by   Yiggs
    Quote from cn2007rn
    It's good to get the bachelor's but if money is tight or you want to start working sooner, get the associate's, it's cheaper and you can always go back for the BSN, and most hospitals offer tuition reimbursement so you can pursue your BSN. The shortage is so bad you will not have a problem getting a job as an ADN.
    I had an Associate Degree in Nursing and worked as a bedside nurse for many years and still do. However, I later obtained my BSN partially at the expence of the hospitaal I work for. I started my MSN but stopped after a couple credits. My intentions was to become a distant learning professor, but I am reconsidering this because I would have to pay quite a bit out of pocket for my MSN and the salary after i graduate is not much more than I am getting now, it may even be less! I am thinking of using my nursing degree and experience to transition into a new career in which I can use my nursing knowledge later on in life.
  3. by   ICU, RN, BSN, B.S.
    Quote from mickjordmoll
    Can anyone tell me the major differences between an associates degree and a bachelors degree? I realize the bachelors requires more schooling and more job opportunities.
    Jobwise is what I mean. Can you still aquire a job at a hospital with an associates? Is it better to continue education and earn your bachelors?
    If you live in Massachusetts, many of the hospitals require you to have a BSN or else they won't even consider interviewing you. Having a BSN looks better on your resume and will open the door for you to move on in other educational areas and more opportunities.

    Comparing cirriculum, BSN goes into much more depth with nursing overall....some ADN programs do not have specific patho & pharm classes either.

    Go for the BSN

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