Associates or Bachelors? - page 5

Can anyone tell me the major differences between an associates degree and a bachelors degree? I realize the bachelors requires more schooling and more job opportunities. Jobwise is what I mean. ... Read More

  1. by   08cbrule
    thanks for helping me clear up the associate vs BSN nurse question
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from 08cbrule
    Due to the shortage in nursing do the rules still apply regarding a associate nurse not being to hold a managemnet position?
    No. You'll find many nurse managers and other management positions held by ADN's. This is especially true in smaller hospitals in smaller towns.
  3. by   08cbrule
    thanks for sharing your view on the associate vs bachelor RN regarding management
  4. by   NurseExec
    Quote from 08cbrule
    Due to the shortage in nursing do the rules still apply regarding a associate nurse not being to hold a managemnet position?
    Good Lord, I hope not, LOL!! I am the director of nursing for a 120 bed SNF in Florida, and I'm a proud ADN. 'Nuff said!
  5. by   Boston34
    I have a question. I have the chance to do an accelerated BSN program in one year or an associates program in 2 years....Which one should I choose.. The proce difference is 28,000. I want a good job when I get out of school and pass the NCLEX...any advice...I live in california if that makes a difference on what degree is better..
  6. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from 08cbrule
    Due to the shortage in nursing do the rules still apply regarding a associate nurse not being to hold a managemnet position?
    *** I don't know of any shortage in nursing. Plenty of RNs looking for jobs out there. As for management, most manager jobs I see require a BSN and quite a few want MSN. That said I work in the surgical/trauma/CVICU of a large Magnet hospital and last fall (fall of 2009) they hired a new manager for the unit who has a ASN and no other degree. Lots of the small rural hospitals around here have nurse managers who are diploma or associates degree nurses.
  7. by   FUTURERNTOO
    I will graduate in May with my associates and will continue to get my bachelors. However the pay is the same and as I have been applying for jobs and speaking with HR staff, they do not have a preference for one over the other. I have heard from many nurses on the floor that they like our students who are in the two year program more then the 4 year because we have more clinical experience and we help them out alot more then the other students. Either way each person decides on their own career path and what is best for them. No one here is better than anyone else because of the degree they have. I believe one of the principles instilled in us in nursing school is to be non judgemental.
  8. by   rnwannabesoon
    Yay! Good for you! I am yet to start my prerequisites. any advice on what classes to take first? If the nursing program hard? How long did you wait to get in? Are you in california?
  9. by   salzburg
    Hi Everybody,
    can somebody to help me?
    Because of my family situation I would need to know how many
    1. theoretical hours
    2. practical hours
    3. individual preparationhours the following educational programs consist: BSc. nursing, Associate degree in Nursing and hospital nursing diplom. It's no important whitch educational program is it, only the USA, and the exact hours. Unfortunatelly the home pages of the programs give information only about the credits, but i need the hours.

    thank you for your help in advance!!!
    Have a nice day :
    salzburg
  10. by   xtxrn
    Depending on what part of the country you live/work in, there are a LOT of opportunities for ADNs to move beyond bedside nursing. I spent very little time doing only bedside nursing, and most of my 19 years (before being disabled, but still having my license active) in charge or management....hospital charge (acute care, not SNF), and management in nursing homes.

    The only people limiting ADNs are the hospitals that refuse to realize there's room for all of us. We all take the same boards, and patients never ask about nursing theory.
  11. by   BrandonB779
    Salzburg,

    I originally was going to a 4 year university Bachelors program, but because of money issues, I withdrew and found myself in a hospital Diploma program that gave me so much more experience and lecture on it. Diploma are usually 2 years (if you have your pre-reqs/co-requesites already done, but some allow you to do them both at the same time, however not recommended lol) As for bachelors and associates degrees, they usually take a little longer and they broaden the spectrum for us the only reason no degree out of our hospital based program was because we didnt totally touch on community resourcing/nursing management but other than that it was the same old program you find everywhere else. It also depends on where you want to go with your career, if you really want clinical experience/management check out the clinical hours, some places dont give more than the bare minimum where as others do somewhere to 1 1/2 to 2x the required amount. Just be wary of that because you want to be able to have as much experience as possible during school, it really builds on it.
  12. by   xtxrn
    My associates program was a 2 year program. I did my pre-reqs ahead of the nursing classes to be able to focus more.
  13. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from xtxrn
    My associates program was a 2 year program. I did my pre-reqs ahead of the nursing classes to be able to focus more.
    The community college where I did my associates degree is a two year program from start to finish. There are no college class pre-reqs. Some people strech it out longer for personal reasons but many people finish in 4 semesters.

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