Is an Associate's degree a waste of time?

  1. 0
    Hi,
    I have read many posts from working nurses telling about how their employers are almost mandating that all 2-yr nurses have their BSN and the employer will even pay for the schooling. This leads me to belive that the days of getting a job with a 2-yr degree in nursing are quickly coming to an end.

    I am set to start a 2-yr program Fall of 2013 and will graduate Dec 2015. In your opinion, am I going to be able to get a job with that or will a BSN be required for mostly all entry level positions in nursing?

    I have other degrees and I know that there are many Accelerated programs that award a 2nd degree/career BSN in as little as 11-12 months, but right now that is not an option for me. (I have to stay employed during school)

    Please advice!
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  3. 39 Comments so far...

  4. 7
    I am in an ADN program right now and upon graduation, I will find work and then go back for my BSN. I like the ADN route better because you can start work and start making money to help pay for the rest of your school. I also plan on going back for grad school. =)
    Tait, JZ_RN, Despareux, and 4 others like this.
  5. 0
    How long until you graduate? I have not even started the program yet, so I am kind of worried about using the 2-yr degree to find a job when the standard seems to be pushing towards BSN's. I'm not opposed to getting a BSN but I want to crawl before I walk, learn as I work in my career.
    Quote from Murseman2011
    I am in an ADN program right now and upon graduation, I will find work and then go back for my BSN. I like the ADN route better because you can start work and start making money to help pay for the rest of your school. I also plan on going back for grad school. =)
  6. 2
    I graduated with an ADN and didn't find a job for 8-9 months because of it. Everywhere I applied wanted BSN nurses. I finally got a job at a smaller community hospital that was still hiring ADNs. I'm now working on my BSN so I can hopefully get on at a bigger hospital some day! But even the hospital I work at now is encouraging ADNs to get their BSNs.
    patty89 and grantchatt like this.
  7. 0
    Thanks! Scary thought to invest that much time, money and effort, only for it to not be good enough!

    Quote from nurseintx0511
    I graduated with an ADN and didn't find a job for 8-9 months because of it. Everywhere I applied wanted BSN nurses. I finally got a job at a smaller community hospital that was still hiring ADNs. I'm now working on my BSN so I can hopefully get on at a bigger hospital some day! But even the hospital I work at now is encouraging ADNs to get their BSNs.
  8. 11
    I am an ADN and doing just fine. I think you should research your current area and see what the hospitals are requiring or requesting. It really does vary from place to place. Also keep in mind that if you work as an aide or tech at a hospital, they often waive the BSN "required" or at least this worked out for much of my graduating class.
    JZ_RN, S.vincent, RunnerRN2b2014, and 8 others like this.
  9. 7
    No, definitely not a waste of time. I say get the 2 year degree, get your RN then go back for the BSN if you need it. You can work as an RN and make an RN salary while finishing the BSN. You never know what the next 4 years may bring, get the RN. Some hospitals offer tuition reimbursement for the BSN part, too. ANd like Missladyrn said, a lot of places will still hire a 2 year RN if they worked there as an NA during school.
  10. 3
    As said above, this can be very regional. Is there a push to BSN? Yes, but it is also an employer market right now. Do I see that changing by 2015? Personally, no. But I am not an economist. I have my ASN. My employer is not pushing me to get my BSN but will pay for me to do so and I am pursuing that. For me, getting my ASN first has paid off handsomely. My employer paid for my schooling, my NCLEX review class, my NCLEX itself and will pay for my BSN. Free education and able to work as an RN after the first leg of it. Not too shabby. However, I do not think my situation is really the norm anymore.
    grantchatt, patty89, and bcandygurl like this.
  11. 2
    I had the same concerns. However, as someone mentioned above you can't anticipate what is going to happen in the future. Either way, it is going to take the same amount of time to complete. I am currently working on my ADN and I graduate May 2014. I am a second degree student too, and I chose this route because I need to continue working. After I complete my ADN, I'm trying to go the RN-MSN route. Not interested in getting another bachelors, but if I have to it is only one year more. Oh yea, not to mention you qualify for more scholarships and grant money. So basically I'm going to school for free with my employer's tuition reimbursement. I just have to pay for books and other supplies. I currently work in the healthcare field in research though...this may or may not matter.
    Last edit by bcandygurl on Aug 30, '12
    grantchatt and patty89 like this.
  12. 1
    I recently graduated with an ADN and was transferred into an RN position at the hospital where I had worked as an aide for 6 months. In my graduating class all of the people who were working in hospitals before graduating have had the same experience; those who did not already work in a hospital have had mixed luck in finding jobs. In my RN interview I was told I needed to get my BSN, but my manager recommended not going to school during my first year on the job so that I could just focus on my job. If I were you, I would get a hospital job now so that you will have hiring priority over your classmates, and then you will know exactly what your hospital requires for RN jobs.
    grantchatt likes this.


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