Is an Associate's degree a waste of time? - page 4

by grantchatt 19,166 Views | 39 Comments

Hi, I have read many posts from working nurses telling about how their employers are almost mandating that all 2-yr nurses have their BSN and the employer will even pay for the schooling. This leads me to belive that the days of... Read More


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    Around here the hospitals regularly hire ADN nurses. The listings don't even say "BSN preferred". I work at an area hospital and we regularly hire ADN new grads, they are paid the same as the BSN nurses and they are not required to go back for their BSN in any certain amount of time. One hospital system still pays for ADNs to go back for their BSN (but doesn't require them to) I have even heard of ADN new grads getting hired at the well known magnet hospitals that had tech experience in school.

    So around here, no an ADN is not a waste of time. It's a very valuable degree. It all depends on your geographic location though. If your aspiration is to work at the biggest and most well known hospital in your area or the Mayo of your area, then yes it probably will be harder to get a job as an ADN because of stiff competition.
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    Quote from soxgirl2008
    Around here the hospitals regularly hire ADN nurses. The listings don't even say "BSN preferred". I work at an area hospital and we regularly hire ADN new grads, they are paid the same as the BSN nurses and they are not required to go back for their BSN in any certain amount of time. One hospital system still pays for ADNs to go back for their BSN (but doesn't require them to) I have even heard of ADN new grads getting hired at the well known magnet hospitals that had tech experience in school.

    So around here, no an ADN is not a waste of time. It's a very valuable degree. It all depends on your geographic location though. If your aspiration is to work at the biggest and most well known hospital in your area or the Mayo of your area, then yes it probably will be harder to get a job as an ADN because of stiff competition.
    Do you mind sharing what area or state you're in? I'm in a MA and everyone tells me that it's impossible to find a job here with an ADN (although I think there must be some opportunities outside of hospitals or in rural areas). I won't graduate 'til early 2015, but I wouldn't mind moving to another for jobs. Hopefully the job market will have gained some stability then.
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    I'm in Wisconsin. I wouldn't check out the Madison area because I've heard it's flooded with BSN grads and its impossible to find a job up there, but here in southern Wisconsin the market for ADNs still seems good. I also live in an area that puts out many more ADN grads than BSN grads so that could be why.I would definitely try more rural hospitals by you too. Idk how it is in MA, but it seems around here the more rural the hospital the less they care about the BSN/ADN
    umbdude likes this.
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    I think it depends on one main factor: The area you live in. You have to research the RN job market--do a job search of all the hospitals in your area and outlying area and see what their RN hiring requirements are.

    For instance, in Los Angeles where I live, I was going to do ADN program but then I started researching the job market and ALOT like 98% of the RN jobs I looked up, several hospitals said BSN required. I only ran into 2 that said ADN. And nurses that have ADNs hospitals are requiring that they get their BSN, with some hospitals even having on hospital BSN schooling for their ADN nurses on hospital grounds or offering BSN school tuition reimbursement. ADN nurses are definitely being phased out in the Los Angeles area. I figure by the time I graduate from my nursing program, the ADN RN programs will definitely be obsolete in the LA area.
    Last edit by calistudent818 on Oct 27, '12 : Reason: typos
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    Quote from not.done.yet
    As said above, this can be very regional. Is there a push to BSN? Yes, but it is also an employer market right now. Do I see that changing by 2015? Personally, no. But I am not an economist. I have my ASN. My employer is not pushing me to get my BSN but will pay for me to do so and I am pursuing that. For me, getting my ASN first has paid off handsomely. My employer paid for my schooling, my NCLEX review class, my NCLEX itself and will pay for my BSN. Free education and able to work as an RN after the first leg of it. Not too shabby. However, I do not think my situation is really the norm anymore.
    Did you ever wonder where that money is coming from?
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    what area are you from?
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    Chattanooga tn
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    I don't recommend that anyone get an ADN anymore. Especially if you live in a high-demand area with a lot of hospitals or nursing schools.

    I had a previous degree in Biology and thought that my BS+ADN=BSN, at least for a little while to get me a job when I graduated. Not true. Even the hospital that I worked at while in school, and who paid for my nursing education, would not hire me as a nurse without a BSN. It took me 3 years (with prereqs) to finish my ADN and by the time I was out, I was so burnt out from school and didn't want to immediately enroll.

    Yes, I got a job after graduation (at a SNF, and then a LTAC hospital), but I had to settle, and now I need to go back to school for my BSN anyways. I wish I had just done it from the start. All I want is to start a family with my husband, as I'm almost 30 now, and I have to continue school in order to be competitive in this market. Unless you live in the middle of the country and have rural hospitals who are willing to hire ADN nurses, I wouldn't bother.
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    Quote from nurseintx0511
    I graduated with an ADN and didn't find a job for 8-9 months because of it. Everywhere I applied wanted BSN nurses. I finally got a job at a smaller community hospital that was still hiring ADNs. I'm now working on my BSN so I can hopefully get on at a bigger hospital some day! But even the hospital I work at now is encouraging ADNs to get their BSNs.
    Most of the new grads (all BSN or even MSN) I worked with in my MSN practicum were looking for work for a year or more as well, so it isn't limited to just ADNs.
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    I think it depends on where you are looking. I live in LA, and almost all applications say BSN. Now and days with so many nurses looking for jobs, hospitals can be picky on who they want.


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