Associates degree vs. Bachelors

  1. 0 I was just wondering if anyone could clarify wether there's actually a significant difference if one opts for an associates degree program rather than a bachelors degree program. Most would say time is the first difference but i found that to be false at least in my area. At the community college here, it's called a two year program since it's a two year school, but in all actuality before you can even apply for the program you have to have at least a year to year and a half of prereqs. out of the way. So it ends up taking just as long at the univ. Then I've heard that there isn't a pay difference between the two degrees. The difference is apparent when it comes time for promotions. T or F? Any help would be appreciated
  2. Visit  RNntraining profile page

    About RNntraining

    From 'El Paso, TX'; 34 Years Old; Joined Sep '02; Posts: 25.

    18 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  OBNURSEHEATHER profile page
    0



    Heather
  4. Visit  Brownms46 profile page
    0
  5. Visit  studentOH profile page
    0
    *lol* heather...

    check way back on this topic, there have been several threads with a variety of good answers. I've read every one of them .

    Bri
  6. Visit  Love-A-Nurse profile page
    0
    originally posted by rnntraining
    i was just wondering if anyone could clarify wether there's actually a significant difference if one opts for an associates degree program rather than a bachelors degree program. most would say time is the first difference but i found that to be false at least in my area. at the community college here, it's called a two year program since it's a two year school, but in all actuality before you can even apply for the program you have to have at least a year to year and a half of prereqs. out of the way. so it ends up taking just as long at the univ. then i've heard that there isn't a pay difference between the two degrees. the difference is apparent when it comes time for promotions. t or f? any help would be appreciated
    hello and welcome to the board! i would suggest just to weight the differences of what you want in turns of your career. both programs are good and yes, there are a few differences, more general/pre-reqs classes, types of classes (more in depth of some), money, time one has to devote in getting their degree, etc). however, both will lead you to an rn degree (associate/bsn etc) and sitting for the same rn boards and after passing the nclex-rn, you may work as a registered nurse.

    i do wish you all the best.
  7. Visit  det01 profile page
    0
    Well basically what you stated is about what I have beent old. However, in some areas I hear BSN is paid substantially more. I also found out in class last night that here is TN if you decide to specialize (which is additional raise in money and security that you can stay in the area you like instead of being moved around) that you have to have your BSN before they will let you take the tests necessary for specialization. if you are interested in that, you might want to check the rules where you are to see if they are different.
  8. Visit  Fgr8Out profile page
    0
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER



    Heather
    :: scooching in with Heather ::
  9. Visit  live4today profile page
    0
    First, welcome to allnurses....RNintraining!

    Second......BWWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAAA----BWAAAAAAA---

    Third......I needed to vent after seeing yet another thread about this subject.

    You see.......RNintraining......it's not your question that sends us into 'MENTAL STRESS'.....it's just that we get hit with this question constantly.......and ALL of us have varied opinions on the subject......which....unfortunately...usually ends up in a 'PMS SESSION'......of sorts! :chuckle

    So........go for what you feel best works for you. Eventually.....you'll either enjoy nursing or not....regardless of what route you take to arrive at becoming one. You can always INCREASE your education down the way......or...LIKE SOME HERE.......get the BSN and get it over with now. Either way......once you successfully pass the NCLEX exam.....you will receive the privilege of having a license to practice as a Professional Registered Nurse. It's not how you arrive at your goals in life.......it's THAT you arrive at your goals in life. So.........ask yourself what your goals are.......match them up with the education you will need to reach those goals.......and WAALAH....THERE YOU BE! I wish you the best! :kiss
  10. Visit  OBNURSEHEATHER profile page
    0
    Originally posted by Fgr8Out


    :: scooching in with Heather ::
    Come on in baby......

    Heather
  11. Visit  RNntraining profile page
    0
    alright, alright! sorry for the most repetative thread ever posted :angryfire but as cheerfuldoer and LPN,future,Rn mentioned....I am new to the board. My appologies to all who had a small brain fart over my stupidity Thanks for the help and patience.....and please continue to hide under the chairs and not throw them. Have a peacful 9/11 and thanks again!
  12. Visit  spineCNOR profile page
    0
    Yes, there is generally no difference in pay between the BSN and ADN, but think of your future. You may be (and I hope you will be) estatically happy being a bedside nurse, but the day may come when you want the opportunity to do other things in nursing-research, case management, nurse practitioner, etc, etc, etc....

    Getting your BSN now will make it easier for you to change gears later.

    I, with a small group of over 40 "senior citizens", just finished a BSN completion program for that very reason-we have been happy at the bedside, but we all wanted an opportunity to move into areas of nursing that would be easier on our aging feet and knees.

    Upward mobility in nursing is possible without the degree, but generally requires being in the right place at the right time, or knowing the right contacts.

    There is no guarantee, but getting your BSN now may well make things better for you down the road.
    Last edit by spineCNOR on Sep 13, '02
  13. Visit  New CCU RN profile page
    0
    Hey there! Don't worry about asking that question. It is a perfectly good one and if it makes others upset or annoyed well why does it?

    I am a recent BSN grad. At the end of the road, an RN is an RN is an RN. Neither is better. However, there is a ton of talk that upsets people saying that in order to "raise the bar for nursing" a BSN should be entry level. This is what upsets people. While I am not saying that a BSN will make a better nurse, bc it will not. It does make sense that requiring a bachelor's degree will improve nursing overall. Other professions out there do the same thing. We as nurses seem for some reason to be very slow and reluctant when it comes to change.

    I personally did start off slightly higher salary wise than fellow ADN grads. It varies state to state, facility to facility. For you, it seems that if it is going to take just as long to get your BSN as your ADN, why not just go for the BSN? This way if you ever decide to go back for your master's, it will be easier!

    The only difference in the program to me from talking to others, so please, I am not claiming to be an expert and I am trying to choose my words carefully bc I do not want to offend anyone!!!!! The only difference b/n the two programs is that the BSN programs have Research and Leadership and Management classess. Both require similiar prereq classes. Both cover basically all of the same nursing theory, clinical, etc.

    Do I think the extra classes were beneficial to me? ABSOLUTELY!!! Not that I couldn't make it w/o them. But these classes gave me the chance to understand research and evidenced based practice and question more of the why this and that rather than just doing this and that. The leadership class we spent a semester shadowing a nurse manager and also taking turns being charge nurse for our clinical groups. It really helped us put ourselves in their shoes and understand what they do.

    I will repeat myself though. An RN is an RN no matter what degree behind it.
  14. Visit  RNntraining profile page
    0
    congrats spineCNOR on your accomplishment and thank you new ccu rn. I've always told myself that I'd at least have my bachelors degree, and when I found out that there wasn't a huge difference between the two I considered just going for the associates program since it's more affordable. But then it will actually end up being more costly for me to complete my adn and then when i decide to complete my bsn i'll still end up forking out the mula$. thanks again for your help


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