Associate to Bachelor Degree

  1. Hi! I am graduating in May from an ADN program. I am thinking about going to get my Bachelor's degree. I was just wondering from any of you who have your Bachelor's degree if you feel it was worth the time and money in going on? I know alot of hospitals don't acknowledge the difference in ADN and BSN nurses.
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   AfloydRN
    Basically you are doing it for yourself and possibly for further education down the road. Most hospitals do not have a difference in pay for RN or BSN since we do the same job. The only difference would be if you are pursuing a management job, which obviously pays more.
  4. by   Tweety
    They don't acknowledge the difference in graduating nurses.

    However, there are many "BSN preferred" jobs away from the bedside after you get experience. It's different in different parts of the country. It's definately worth me getting my BSN because I can get away from the bedside as I age.

    After you graduate look around the place you work. What kind of degrees do the non-bedside nurses have at the facilty? Do the educators, quality control, risk managers, case managers, drug reps, etc. have associates degrees. If they do, then skip BSN.

    You're still young. Are 100% sure of where you want to be 20 years from now (if you're not rich that is). Many of us say "I always want to be with patients" and then find ourselves 55 years old with bad backs, bad knees and a serious case of burnout. As we look at 10 or more years of working we're going to look away from the bedside. This can be done with an Associates Degree for sure, but in some areas, like where I work, you're locked out without a BSN.

    I disagree with the above statement "The only difference would be if you are pursing a management job".

    Getting the BSN might not have any immediate benefits, but you never know when you'll need it.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 28, '07
  5. by   Tweety
    Check this thread out. http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/how-d...ot-196189.html

    Also there is a "sticky" at the top of this forum with many other discussions.
  6. by   cota2k
    I am in a RN to BSN program. Very exciting for me, as I want this NOW for myself. As previously stated by others; the back, knees and "endurance" have limits. Eventually, yes I want to get away from the day to day grind of patient care.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Good luck in your RN-BSN program! It's a great step you are taking.
  8. by   nowplayingEDRN
    If you are thinking about a BSN following your ADN, do it now. It is much easier to go for the BSN immediately than to wait for a bit before pursuing it. And as stated, there are many jobs out there that are BSN prefered, especially if you plan on pursuing a management position.
  9. by   traumaRUs
    I was an LPN to ADN, on up. For me, when I decided to go back to school (8 years after getting my ADN), I wanted an MSN. The difference between ADN and BSN isn't much if any. So...for me the important step was the MSN.
  10. by   nowplayingEDRN
    I would say it is all what a person's personal goal is, their finances and what they wish to achieve in the end.
  11. by   NeosynephRN
    I have been told by many nurses and nursing instructors to go for the BSN if possible...I was told that it is worth it not to have your fellow nurses look down on you for not having it...and thinking they are better than you just because of those letters...I DID NOT SAY THIS...this is not how I feel...but what I was told by one of my clinical instructors that was a 30= year nursing vet. I will probably go to get my BSN..not because I care about the "credentials' so much...but for the future...what if I got hurt and could not do floor nursing...I would like an "In" to a less physically demanding sector of nursing.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from calla2114
    I have been told by many nurses and nursing instructors to go for the BSN if possible...I was told that it is worth it not to have your fellow nurses look down on you for not having it...and thinking they are better than you just because of those letters...I DID NOT SAY THIS...this is not how I feel...but what I was told by one of my clinical instructors that was a 30= year nursing vet. I will probably go to get my BSN..not because I care about the "credentials' so much...but for the future...what if I got hurt and could not do floor nursing...I would like an "In" to a less physically demanding sector of nursing.

    Your instructor was probably the one who looked down upon the ADN degree.

    I'm currently working on my BSN for my own professional development and job opportunities as I age. However, as an ADN for the last 15 years, I haven't not one time that I was looked down upon by my fellow nurses. In fact just the oppositite. Not to toot my own horn or sound arrogant, but I feel my professionalism and hard work ethic, has earned me respect, rather than disrespect.

    By all means get your BSN, I highly recommend it myself. But don't get it for the reasons this instructor said, because that's a bit lame, and not the reality for most of us in the real world.
  13. by   NeosynephRN
    Just so you know...she has been a nurse for 30 years and is going back to school now for her BSN...so no she is not the one looking down on the ADN's cause that is what she is!!
    I am however happy to hear that your experience has been different from her's...I will enter the workforce this summer as an ADN..I am not in the least ashamed of the degree I will have...I worked very hard for it!! I may go back for my BSN...but that decision was made long before I met this instructor...I just wanted to share an experience. Thanks for the encouraging words!
  14. by   Tweety
    I'm apologize. Here, you can't be an instructor without a BSN regardless of number of years experience, so I was making a presumption.

    Anyway, good luck to you. Seriously getting a BSN because others look down on you is not a good reason to get a BSN in my opinion. Be proud to be an ADN and get the BSN for yourself and your advancement, not because others look down on it. Again, I haven't found that to be true. It's not a topic that comes up often, if ever.

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