ASN vs BSN

  1. 0
    Hello ~

    I am going back to school this fall to finish my degree in nursing. I took some time off (which turned into years) because I was not spending enough time at home and now I have to retake all of my sciences...makes me sad. Now my school offers a BSN program which will be more time and work and throws my time of graduation off but I would like to do it if it will actually be beneficial. Can anyone help me with the ASN vs BSN? Would it be beneficial to my career or is an RN an RN no matter what the degree? My plan is to work in Pediatric Oncology or labor and delivery.

    Thanks!
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    BSNs and ASNs both become RNs, taking the same NCLEX. There really is no initial advantage as both nurses come to the bedside on equal footing. The advantage is that the BSN provides greater job opportunities later on down the line. It gives you an edge should you decide in a few years (or many years if you have to work that long) to do something else. BSN-preferred jobs are in administration, quality control, education, research, pharmaceuticals, etc.

    One never knows what they are going to want to do in the future, so getting the BSN now would provide options for the future. Go for it.

    Good luck.
  6. 0
    PLEASE HELP ANSWER MY QUESTION!

    I know this topic has been beaten to death, but I am really trying to get an official answer (as impossible as that might be). Basically, I just want to know what the TRUE industry attitude is towards this. So here go's:

    I have a BA in Biology and would like the get my nursing degree.

    I was going to take some pre-reqs then do an accelerated BSN program. However, it would be out of state tuition - $37K TOTAL - and I wouldnt graduate until July 2009!

    I am now thinking abt doing an ADN program that will only cost me abt$11K and I;ll graduate in March of 2009.

    But will I be dooming myself if I dont get a BSN? Or does it not really even matter?

    I should also state that my ultimate goal would be to work for a yr or two and then go a RN to BSN program (if I go the ADN route) OR just do a degreed (non-BSN) to MS program (NP)...

    PLEASE HELP!!! I HAVE TO MAKE A DECISION ASAP!!!
  7. 0
    Speaking completely for myself...

    I would go the ADN route now. It costs considerably less money, and gets you working at the bedside quicker. THEN, after you've worked for a bit, consider doing coursework towards the BSN. Many hospitals will help pay your tuition, plus there are many programs that do this online so that you can continue working and making RN wages, wihtout having to go to class.

    Just my $.02...
  8. 0
    Yes I would agree with the above poster and go with the ADN.

    The problem with accelerated programs is similar to doing your pre-reqs during the Summer Session...You are really thrown so much information in such a short period of time that it is hard to really have it all sink in. And then there is the cost...ouch.

    You get the same pay as a BSN as you would with ADN, and so many options in the field of Nursing are still open to you. You may even decide to never bother with ADN to BSN if you like working in any of these various areas. Myself..I don't plan on ever touching management at all, but I would like to teach, so the BSN appeals to me.

    If you couldn't care less though, and are happy with a job as an RN...then it doesn't make a difference one bit.

    You will find what really stands out is the individual. There are some crappy BSN nurses out there and there are some crappy ADN nurses out there...in the end it really comes down to the Nurse and how they have applied themselves both during their school years and beyond.

    And if you do want to do the ADN to BSN thing, it will be much easier than the original nursing program. And from what I hear, going one step further from that point to your Master's is cake in comparison to the Nursing Program.

    It all depends on what will work best for you. Heck, considering how hard it is to get into a program just be happy with whatever you can get
  9. 0
    Quote from maggieo
    PLEASE HELP ANSWER MY QUESTION!

    I know this topic has been beaten to death, but I am really trying to get an official answer (as impossible as that might be). Basically, I just want to know what the TRUE industry attitude is towards this. So here go's:

    I have a BA in Biology and would like the get my nursing degree.

    I was going to take some pre-reqs then do an accelerated BSN program. However, it would be out of state tuition - $37K TOTAL - and I wouldnt graduate until July 2009!

    I am now thinking abt doing an ADN program that will only cost me abt$11K and I;ll graduate in March of 2009.

    But will I be dooming myself if I dont get a BSN? Or does it not really even matter?

    I should also state that my ultimate goal would be to work for a yr or two and then go a RN to BSN program (if I go the ADN route) OR just do a degreed (non-BSN) to MS program (NP)...

    PLEASE HELP!!! I HAVE TO MAKE A DECISION ASAP!!!

    Don't neglect the direct-entry MSN route. In my case, it was the fastest route to an RN license and, being at a public university, will run about $12,000 (plus expenses).

    Another local state university has an accelerated second bachelor's program that is four semesters in 14 months and runs about $10,000.

    The advantage (for some people, anyway) to many of these programs is that they are competitive admission rather than lottery or waiting list.
  10. 0
    Song in my heart...

    where did you do the direct entry for 12k and what are the competitive schools (GPA that is) versus lottery in our area? I've already applied to Sutter, but where else?

    The thought of a lottery this time around is sending me over the moon.


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