Any RN-BSN programs not requiring more pre-req's 1st?

  1. 0
    I graduated in May 2011, had some set backs, and finally got my licence this past Feb. I'm having problems finding a job where I want to be, and I'd like to take this absent time to just refresh myself on the material. I'm scared to death I wouldnt remember a thing if I were to get hired! It's been a year since clinical! My 1st thought was..duh..go back to school and get my BSN and that way I can do my clinicals in the hospital I'd like to work at, and better myself at the same time. Problem is, in everything I looked at, there was at least a years worth of history, math, etc. to complete BEFORE nursing. This makes my problem even worse, and setting me farther back!

    So..Does anyone know what I can do to refresh myself? NOT the review books, been there done that. With actual teachers and clinicals that will better prepare me? For example, Would anyone let me retake my last semester of the ADN program to "higher my grade" or something like that? Or is there any BSN that doesn't require more pre-req classes than for admission to the ADN program?

    HELP!! And Thanks soo much for any input at all for a newbie looking for a job

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  2. 0
    Each state has core requirements for a bachelor's degree, so I don't know how you could get around that. It's usually the basic things like English, history, and government. There is also a minimum credit amount for degrees, so that's another reason why you need those credits.
    There are refresher courses for nurses! Check our your local CC.
  3. 0
    In all reality, as a new grad you will go through something like an internship. My first Job was at Parkland hospital in Dallas, and I completed their med/surg internship. There will be classes, a long orientation period with a preceptor. I think just looking for a job and insisting you only take one with an internship would satisfy your feelings of being unprepared, as well as getting you out there and working. Now I know, not all hospitals have internships, but at least in the DFW area, all I have worked at have a internship and extensive training programs for new graduates. Hope this helps.
    Last edit by Jennilady1977 on Jun 6, '12 : Reason: mispelling.. ugh.
  4. 0
    As previous poster stated most all states lay down credit distribution for all degrees awarded by two and four year colleges and universities. For instance those seeking any BofS in NYS must take organic chemistry and statistics, amoung other subjects. In addition many colleges have their own requirements as well. Bottom line you aren't going to get out of taking a good share of credits "non-related" to nursing.

    While you can try contacting your former school of nursing to ask about lab or other time for refreshment, many reserve such places for current students. Clinical time would be almost unheard of as you aren't a student and more importantly already hold a vaild RN license.

    Since you are a recent graduate it is only natural to have doubts. Best thing is to find a good and patient intern/orientation program connected to employment. Those in charge of training new grads in better programs expect your skills to be shakey by nature of your being "wet behind the ears" so to speak and will make allowances.

    Until you can find a new grad program that suits/will take you on try volunteering or even working for pay (if you and find) at a clinic. Or, try finding medical/nursing related work such as at a doctor's office where you can do mental exercises and or observe in order to build confidence.
  5. 0
    If you are good at one subject and confident about it, you can CLEP it. Like the second foreign language; at least here in Florida is required as pre-requisite to the BSN, Statistics and such.

    The cost to CLEP it is far less than the class and there are books that help you prepare.

    Good luck.
  6. 0
    Once your already have your RN license; the only type of "clinical" hours in the RN-BSN program are in community health. They aren't med pushing, 12 lead reading type clinicals. The additional nursing courses are theory and leadership type, nothing med/surg type. You ARE a nurse. Additional training is going to come on the job. You can pursue additional classes like ACLS, PALS 12-lead EKG etc. While you don't get college credit for these, you do get CEU's and will build your knowledge base and hopefully you will become more comfortable. The reason many people pursue acute care is that the training is longer and better. New grad's will get a minimun of 8-12 weeks working 1 on 1 with another nurse on their floor. You won't find that in a SFN. Yet SNF usually pay more. They deserve it, their patient load is way too high.
  7. 0
    Quote from happyinillinois
    New grad's will get a minimun of 8-12 weeks working 1 on 1 with another nurse on their floor. You won't find that in a SFN. Yet SNF usually pay more. They deserve it, their patient load is way too high.
    What does SFN mean?

    Also, I am trying to get advise on whether I should wait to finish my BSN to start looking for a nurse job. I just graduated in April with my ADN, just passed boards and will hopefully start in the Spring my BSN. Will I be considered a new graduate if i wait until then? (I am sorry, if this is not the right place to put this question.)
  8. 0
    Snf=nursing home. No do not wait to look for a job. The RN-BSN is not going to give you more clinical experience. Jobs will wonder why you didn't pursue employment, and 2 years from now you will be in the same boat, and your clinical skills will be even rustier. Baptism by fire. You will have some orientation when you are hired. Whatever amount they give you, it won't seem like enough. When you put into practice what you have learned, it will all make sense.
  9. 0
    Quote from happyinillinois
    Snf=nursing home. No do not wait to look for a job. The RN-BSN is not going to give you more clinical experience. Jobs will wonder why you didn't pursue employment, and 2 years from now you will be in the same boat, and your clinical skills will be even rustier. Baptism by fire. You will have some orientation when you are hired. Whatever amount they give you, it won't seem like enough. When you put into practice what you have learned, it will all make sense.
    In South Florida the market is too hard and most positions I see besides requiring experience, are also requesting BSN. Because I knowledge in ophthalmology, I can find a job a lot faster in that area than in nursing.

    This semester; fall, I will be taking the one pre-requisite needed to get into the BSN in the Spring.

    Moving, will only be considered within the state but not out because of my parents.

    I appreciate your advice and I will give it a shot, hopefully someone will give me a chance.


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