advantages of BSN vs. ADN - page 6

by katiebugg

9,335 Views | 58 Comments

Hi, considering that I am very new to all of this, I would appreciate any imput from you all. I am just entering my first semester of an ADN program, and would like to go on to the RN to BSN available at the same college. I still... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from mitchsmom
    Actually, the guy may have seen this:

    Study: Nurses' Education Affects Death Rates
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...threadid=87225
    i actually did a breakdown of this article and study for my BSN program - my research and theory class. The study was SOOO flawed that I cannot believe it was ever published. The person who designed and coordinated carrying out the whole thing has been pretty much torn to pieces. Rightfully so. The whole thing was slanted from the start (in other words, biased).
    Negative propaganda that only hurts our profession. Makes me sick to my stomach!
  2. 0
    My thanks to katiebugg for the question and SmilingBlueEyes for the threads back on page 1. Reading all this feels like a seminar.

    I start a nursing program next month and this feels like time well-spent on a really valuable prerequisite. I learned a lot. Thanks again.
  3. 0
    Quote from zenman
    I'm not talking about ADN vs BSN. Just giving those that can't figure out the value of non-nursing courses a "Dr. Phil" kick in the butt! But, seeing the quality of any graduate now makes me too scared to get sick! Do you know that universities used to NOT have remedial courses to teach what high school was supposed to teach.
    Golly, now could we give that kick in the butt to the nursing boards, the graduate schools, and the nursing employers? Some of us have a *vast* number of non-nursing courses under our belts--by way of non-nursing bachelor's and master's degrees earned in addition to our nursing education--but because our nursing sheepskins come from diploma schools or ADN programs, we're considered sub-standard and not worthy of respect, transfer credit or progressive employment.
  4. 0
    Quote from Fun2Care
    Apparently you liked school. Obviously many do not. That doesn't make them uneducated, and I think that is extremely rude of you to say. Your opinions matter, but not your name calling. Just because one doesn't want to take non-nursing courses doesn't mean he or she is trash. I'm just offended by your comment.
    Sorry to damge your fragile psyche; I'm just reality focused. Who said anything about trash? Anyone who cannot see the value in non-nursing courses are, in my opinion, not educated enough to know what is going on. No name calling, just facts.

    Filling the pockets of colleges does not make one professional. You can't use what you learned in history class to save a pt.'s life, and unless you teach history, or go to trial against it , then why should you have to learn it after learning it through out your life in grade school, and high school????
    Colleges have a right to make money for providing a needed service like any other business. Saving lives is only a small part of what we do. Being "educated" means you learn more than you did in high school. Taking only courses specific to a certain area makes one a trade school graduate.
    So, you can't figure out how history might make you a better nurse? Lets just say that we get some of the survivors from the recent disaster admitted to your hospital. Would you know about their customs or would you offend the heck out of them? If you had a geography course you might even be aware of where this disaster occurred.

    Also, my mother is one of a very few females buyers in a big international helicopter company. She did not graduate from college, in fact only was able to take one class. However, she has been with this company for 20 (?) years, and she is the only buyer without a college education. Do you think because she is uneducated she is incompetent to do her job? Obviously she is very competent! Does that make her not a professional? Is she the only nonprofessional in the professional dept. because she doesn't have her BSN degree? I think not!
    *sigh* Correct, she is not a professional by vertue of educational standards. She can, however, (and probably does) act professional. Are you aware of the difference? And it sounds like she is very competent in her job but that issue is another thread entirely. My brother, a trade school graduate, is very good at his job but not a "professional" unless you consider that the term is now watered down so that everyone is a "professional." Let's see...professional taxi driver, profesional police officer, professional auto mechanic, professional pest control technician, etc., etc..

    People like you that try to belittle others are the reason we all can't get along and act like adults. You are not better than anyone else ADN or BSN!
    "People like you"...people like me might be the voice of reason and keep others on track! I never did consider myself any better than anyone else. And there are lots of other reasons why our 'profession" doesn't get along and it's not because of me!

    Oh, BTW...I've never even seen "Dr. Phil". :angryfire
    Try to not let your feelings get in the way of a good discussion. Go to the "happy place."
  5. 0
    Quote from jeepgirl
    i actually did a breakdown of this article and study for my BSN program - my research and theory class. The study was SOOO flawed that I cannot believe it was ever published. The person who designed and coordinated carrying out the whole thing has been pretty much torn to pieces. Rightfully so. The whole thing was slanted from the start (in other words, biased).
    Negative propaganda that only hurts our profession. Makes me sick to my stomach!

    Well, I'll be!! A perfect example of how a "useless" course can be "useful!"
  6. 0
    Quote from catlady
    Golly, now could we give that kick in the butt to the nursing boards, the graduate schools, and the nursing employers? Some of us have a *vast* number of non-nursing courses under our belts--by way of non-nursing bachelor's and master's degrees earned in addition to our nursing education--but because our nursing sheepskins come from diploma schools or ADN programs, we're considered sub-standard and not worthy of respect, transfer credit or progressive employment.
    My foot is not big enough!

    Do your other courses give you a different perspective on nursing? Maybe you can address that with some of the others here.
  7. 0
    The girl in front of me turned to her friend and asked...What does edematous mean and where is the antecubital area?
    Okay, deep breath.....Here goes. I have NEVER thought of myself as better than ADN student nurses or nurses. I am SO tired of getting this "you think you're better than me because you have/are working towards a BSN, but you don't get taught anything." :angryfire (I also go to a private university, so you can imagine the other comments I hear about being rich.....sure, that's why I work full time and am $45,000 in student loan debt! That's a different soap box though). In my many clinical hours (another myth....BSN nurses do have many of those as well!) I have come across great ADN nurses and great BSN nurses. I have also encountered lousy ADN nurses and lousy BSN nurses. So, let's just take INDIVIDUALS into consideration, OK? There's no point in lumping ADNs and BSNs into 2 different categories. The person that does know what edematous means and where the antecubital area is needs some serious help. But I can tell you first hand that there are actually BSN students who (gasp!) know what that means.

    And that's my 2 cents.
  8. 0
    Quote from tvccrn
    So, an ADN is more likely to kill a patient, huh. Well, when I was in my last semester of college (I'm only an ADN) I attended a mock trial. This is held every year in Dallas, TX for the graduating nursing students in the area and so there were both ADN as well as BSN students there. The BSN students from Baylor University were sitting in front of us and my friends and I heard a lot of comments from them that made us scared for their future patients. But, the one that topped the cake was when it was mentioned that the patient was so edematous that the doctors couldn't get an antecubital IV in and they had to do a cut-down. The girl in front of me turned to her friend and asked...What does edematous mean and where is the antecubital area?

    If that's the way they teach BSN students, then I hope any time my family or myself is in the hospital I have an ADN for my nurse.
    WOW i know what all of that means and i haven't had a single nursing class yet!
  9. 0
    moderator's note:
    i am locking this thread for a "cooling down" period.
    please remember to debate the issues and avoid personal attacks or generalized statements. also, please avoid "talking down" to other posters, "soap-boxing," or other condescending behavior.

    thank you
    Last edit by VickyRN on Jan 1, '05


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