ADN's being pushed out - page 5

by pammc000

103,368 Views | 650 Comments

I work for a large Magnet hospital. As nursing becomes more popular, and nurses not in short supply, I have noticed something ominous has being going on lately. Several of our older and very seasoned ADN nurses are being fired.... Read More


  1. 6
    I am about to turn 50. I just do not want to go back to school and I especially do not want to take on debt to do it. Sigh.
    walkingrock, SleeepyRN, KarenJordan, and 3 others like this.
  2. 1
    Sadly, I am facing this reality. I just earned my ADN RN, I have been a LPN for 10 years. At least 3 of the jobs I have applied to flat out told me that if I had a BSN I would have got the job. To add to that sting, I have heard over and over "LPN experience does not count". I am so dissapointed. I already have a BS but I wanted that RN so badly . . . now that I have it I am being told that I have to get a BSN. Looks like I'll be going back to the RHIA work for a while. *sigh*
    montecarlo64 likes this.
  3. 0
    Nursing salaries don't match the enormous responsibilities at the bedside! My unit is in a constant state of training and as a 25 plus year nurse there are no rewards for
    precepting and a penny for certification!! Oh and salary is maxed and I am 50 years old! Great incentive to stay..ha!!a few seconds ago · LikeUnlike

  4. 0
    I am a new graduate of an ADN program and will be pursuing my BSN this fall because I keep being told that eventually we will be told we will have to have it by 2020. I recently got a job and asked my employer about tution reimbursement and pay differential for BSN. I was shocked to find out from HR there is NO tution help and absolutely NO differential in pay. I am really taken back by this since they are pushing for their nurses to become a BSN, which I might add, not ONE nurse in this hospital is a BSN. I will probably be the first one even over my Nurse Manager who is "working" on it. UGH
  5. 1
    I think that some of the hospitals in my area TRIED to go the BSN only route BUT....there's only one college in our education district that offers a nursing program and it's ADN only. So any nurses with a BSN would have come from another area. So some of the hospitals are easing up and are hiring ADN grads again. I guess that they finally got tired of waiting for something that's not even abundantly available in our area.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  6. 0
    Nowadays BSN is standard. There are hospitals out there who only want nurses with MSN. There are hospitals that give nurses time to get their BSN or else.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  7. 0
    I took summer classes at the local community college here and compared the curriculum for the ASN program to the BSN program that I am in and there are some differences in the type of training received and classes taken. Cardiac rhythms are taught at my program which are not offered at the local community college. In addition, the BSN program participates in clinicals at the local Magnet hospital whereas the community college has simulation labs only. I think it really depends on the school you go to. Pennsylvania is phasing out ASN's completely. If you want a hospital job, you'll need your BSN.
  8. 0
    Quote from JPinto01
    I took summer classes at the local community college here and compared the curriculum for the ASN program to the BSN program that I am in and there are some differences in the type of training received and classes taken. Cardiac rhythms are taught at my program which are not offered at the local community college. In addition, the BSN program participates in clinicals at the local Magnet hospital whereas the community college has simulation labs only. I think it really depends on the school you go to. Pennsylvania is phasing out ASN's completely. If you want a hospital job, you'll need your BSN.
    I appreciate your research. You are the first person who has given some type of differences in the prep as it relates to clinical in the respective programs. (BSN vs ADN) I didn't realize many ADN programs utilized the simulation labs opposed to actual clinical rotation. Maybe "not as much" clinical rotation perhaps. Still there is a difference. But I think BSN programs have similation labs too, to read monitors...ekg's and the likes too huh?? Oh yeah, what on earth is a Magnet hospital???
  9. 5
    Doesn't really matter what side of the fence you're on in the ADN vs. BSN debate or what you may think is or isn't fair...the bottom line is that if employers want their nurses to have a BSN or even an MSN then we as nurses will do as they require or go hungry. It always helps me to remember that the golden rule is whoever has the gold makes the rules.
  10. 2
    Quote from RN In FL
    I appreciate your research. You are the first person who has given some type of differences in the prep as it relates to clinical in the respective programs. (BSN vs ADN) I didn't realize many ADN programs utilized the simulation labs opposed to actual clinical rotation. Maybe "not as much" clinical rotation perhaps. Still there is a difference. But I think BSN programs have similation labs too, to read monitors...ekg's and the likes too huh?? Oh yeah, what on earth is a Magnet hospital???
    You can read about Magnet status here: American Nurses Credentialing Center - ANCC - American Nurses Credentialing Center - ANCC

    Keep in mind that again the quality of the individual program is determined by the program itself and isn't really a matter of ADN vs. BSN. I have never heard of an ADN program in my state that did not have a multitude of clinical rotations at various community hospitals. In my ASN program we did clinicals right alongside our BSN counterparts (often on the same unit) and they were for longer stretches for the accelerated format. We also learned cardiac rhythms. We did spend time each semester in a simulation lab and in a skills lab, but so do the BSN programs.

    For comparison, a friend of mine is in a BSN program right now at a nearby institution and she keeps telling me she is questioning whether she made the right decision to go the route she did. She wants her BSN and that is what made her decision originally when she was accepted to both an ASN and BSN program, but now she feels like her instructors are not really connected with the students and that she is never allowed to actually do anything in clinicals compared to the people in the ASN program beside her. Her main concern seems to be that she feels she will graduate at a significant deficit in the hands-on/bedside care department. I remind her that she will have her BSN when she is done and will have greater education in nursing theory, but she is still primarily worrying over her ability to care for patients.

    My whole rambling point is that just like with the good and bad individual nurses, there are good and bad programs across the US regardless of which degree the individual pursues. I personally encourage folks that ask me about nursing school to look into the programs they are considering and compare them. Talk to people that just graduated. Attend an information seminar- those kinds of things.

    Anyway, I will continue to treat others the way I would like to be treated and I absolutely refuse to judge nurses based on their education background. Some of the best nurses I have ever met were diploma-prepared way back when. I'd love to be able to pick up even just a portion of the wisdom that they have earned in all of their years of practice.
    SnowboardRN and RN In FL like this.


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