ADN vs. BSN

  1. 0 In your opinion, how much more valuable is a BSN over an ADN (if at all)? I have the opportunity to complete my BSN in the same amount of time as my ADN, but it will cost substantially more. Will it pay off for me in the end? I am planning on working in Oregon or California in Labor and Delivery. By the way, I already have a bachelor's and master's degree in business.

    Thank you in advance!!
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  3. Visit  newgrad2005 profile page

    About newgrad2005

    Joined Feb '04; Posts: 120; Likes: 2.

    22 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Erin RN profile page
    0
    Hi

    Since it takes the same amt of time you could go for the BSN but if the money is truly a problem I would think if you have the Bachelors and Masters in Business and there comes a time when you apply for a management job, the business degrees would be even more desirable than a BSN. Most places I have worked "prefer" a BSN for the management positions but in real life many places hire who is best suited to "lead the team" , with your business degrees you would probably have a "leg up" whether you have the BSN or the ADN... Erin
  5. Visit  newgrad2005 profile page
    0
    Thank you, Erin! Keep the advice coming!!!
  6. Visit  Tweety profile page
    0
    There's a lot on this board about this subject. Depends on what your goals in your career are going to be. If you're unsure what you want to be doing 25 years from now, getting the BSN probably is a good idea.

    Just be prepared for the reality that when you graduate, as a BSN or an ADN at first you're going to be making nearly the same. This is a disappointment to many BSN trained nurses, that in the beginning at the bedside there isn't any difference in pay. But as new grad nurses, they both take the same NCLEX and have the same job description at the bedside.

    I say go for the BSN if the opportunity presents itself. Good luck!
  7. Visit  mitchsmom profile page
    0
    I'm not even a nurse yet, but I say go for the BSN if possible. You never know, maybe later you'll decide you want an advanced (nursing) degree and then you would need it. Don't shut a door if you can leave it open.
  8. Visit  Havin' A Party! profile page
    0
    NewGrad -- I'm seeing this differently than my fellow posters. (And BTW, we're in similar situations: I have a bachelor's in engineering and a master's in management.)

    You already have a broad education (the main goal of the BSN).

    I've chosen to go the ADN-RN route.

    If down the road you desire to get into a technical area, then I suggest you consider an accelerated MSN. (In the unlikely event a position you desire requires a BSN, then choose what's best for you between the BSN or MSN options.)

    Just can't see how another BS will make you (us) any more appealing.

    Best of luck!
  9. Visit  Alnamvet profile page
    0
    Quote from LarryG
    NewGrad -- I'm seeing this differently than my fellow posters. (And BTW, we're in similar situations: I have a bachelor's in engineering and a master's in management.)

    You already have a broad education (the main goal of the BSN).

    I've chosen to go the ADN-RN route.

    If down the road you desire to get into a technical area, then I suggest you consider an accelerated MSN. (In the unlikely event a position you desire requires a BSN, then choose what's best for you between the BSN or MSN options.)

    Just can't see how another BS will make you (us) any more appealing.

    Best of luck!
    Well now...that makes a whopping three of us who see that any baccalaureate/masters is no less, and at the very least, an equivalent to the bsn...wow...I am so impressed.
  10. Visit  AlixCoastRN profile page
    0
    I, also, went the ADN route in my 40's because I already had a BA (in outdoor recreation no less!). It took me 5 years to do it because I also had to work pretty much full time. I would not change the way I did it.
  11. Visit  AnnaN5 profile page
    0
    Quote from LarryG
    NewGrad -- I'm seeing this differently than my fellow posters. (And BTW, we're in similar situations: I have a bachelor's in engineering and a master's in management.)

    You already have a broad education (the main goal of the BSN).

    I've chosen to go the ADN-RN route.

    If down the road you desire to get into a technical area, then I suggest you consider an accelerated MSN. (In the unlikely event a position you desire requires a BSN, then choose what's best for you between the BSN or MSN options.)

    Just can't see how another BS will make you (us) any more appealing.

    Best of luck!
    Wow I am glad to finally hear someone with this opinion. I am currently finishing up my BS in Human Biology and would like to get into a nursing program. Pretty much everyone tells me that I need to get a BSN but I guess I just don't see how having a BS plus ADN would make me any less qualified. I know that the Accelerated/Second Degree BSN programs are only 12-18 months in length but I wouldn't be able to get into one of those until May of 2005 and could start an ADN program this fall, so I wouldn't have to take any time off school if I just went into the ADN program.
    Last edit by AnnaN5 on Feb 13, '04
  12. Visit  catlady profile page
    0
    Quote from AnnaN5
    Wow I am glad to finally hear someone with this opinion. I am currently finishing up my BS in Human Biology and would like to get into a nursing program. Pretty much everyone tells me that I need to get a BSN but I guess I just don't see how having a BS plus ADN would make me any less qualified. I know that the Accelerated/Second Degree BSN programs are only 12-18 months in length but I wouldn't be able to get into one of those until May of 2005 and could start an ADN program this fall, so I wouldn't have to take any time off school if I just went into the ADN program.
    Add me to the list. I had a BA and MA before going into nursing. There weren't any accelerated BSN programs when I started in the 1980s; I went for a diploma. I don't feel my education is inferior--actually I think my combination of liberal arts, business, and nursing is far better than that of a BSN--but the nursing hierarchy still doesn't accept me as a college graduate. I taught in an LPN program, but cannot teach in an RN program. The most recent example was this fall when I went for certification through ANCC, and I was not allowed to sit for any of the baccalaureate exams. Almost every so-called "bridge" MSN program I've found requires a minimum of four or five (often more) undergraduate classes before going on to the master's level courses. At five or six hundred dollars per credit, that's too rich for my blood.
  13. Visit  newgrad2005 profile page
    0
    *bump*


    I am coming down to crunch time when I have to decide and I am really torn. I know there's really no right answer, but I am totally stessed about making the "wrong" choice for me, my future, my finanical situation, and my family. Please help!!!

    By the way, I have been doing some research about obtaining a L&D job as a new grad, and whether they prefer a BSN, but I can't find anything....
    Last edit by newgrad2005 on Mar 11, '04
  14. Visit  purplemania profile page
    0
    My facility pays BSN grads $1/hr more, which is >$2,000 year for base pay. Only BSN's or higher are considered for management and, who knows, that may appeal to you some day. I say BSN. No point in closing doors.

    BTW, I did the ADN-BSN route and I know I learned a lot in the BSN program. Just my $0.02.
  15. Visit  manna profile page
    0
    Are the BSN and ADN programs you're looking at comparable in cost and length?

    If so, I'd say go for the BSN - why not? If you do the ADN first and then decide you need a BSN for whatever other reason(s), it'd probably end up taking you longer than it would have it you'd done it that way the first time.


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