ADN vs. BSN

  1. 0
    Is there much of a job difference or pay rate when having an associates degree other than a bachelors degree in nursing? Or would it be better after having an associates to get your bachelors?
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  4. 1
    Quote from futurenurse7
    Is there much of a job difference or pay rate when having an associates degree other than a bachelors degree in nursing? Or would it be better after having an associates to get your bachelors?
    There is no job description difference as an entry-level RN regardless of which degree you obtain. Pay difference depends on the facility, none of the facilities I am familiar with offer any more pay for a BSN alone. It may help you into a charge position or move up a clinical ladder for more money. If you have the time and money to finish a bachelor's degree now, my advice would be to do so, particularly if you are using it as a stepping stone towards being a mid-level practitioner. If not, by all means, get your associate degree and let you future employer help you pay for your BSN completion. Many schools offer most if not all classes online and you can take them at your own pace.
    sassy7cassy likes this.
  5. 0
    Where I live, the pay difference is a quarter more if you have your BSN.
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    I have heard that the pay rate is about the same as both programs yield an RN. However, I had an interview this week and was told that this particular hospital is now only hiring BSN "new grads". I had applied to an ADN program and was waitlisted - it ended up in my best interests to go for the BSN program in my area that could get me right in. Best wishes to you!
  7. 0
    The hospital I was at in Missouri paid 50 cents more per hour for a BSN.
  8. 1
    Where I work, all things being equal BSNs are hired at 4% more.

    However, as stated above, this is entry level and bedside nursing. The advantages of having a BSN come much later down the line as one wants to move away from the bedside.

    Both BSNs and ADNs graduate from similar nursing studies, because they both are prepared to take the same exam, and both enter the bedside on relatively equal footing. So it's natural one is going to make the same amount or smilar amounts of money.

    When deciding is you want a BSN or an ADN one needs to look beyond the entry level salary for bedside nurses but answer questions like "where do I see myself in 20 years", "what are my longterm goals, what would I like to do".
    princesasabia likes this.
  9. 0
    very helpful information
  10. 1
    No Difference in pay here in NC where I work. Actually I noticed that a lot of ADN's have much more bedside experience coming out of school than BSN's.
    sparky28546 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from lilmama007
    No Difference in pay here in NC where I work. Actually I noticed that a lot of ADN's have much more bedside experience coming out of school than BSN's.
    Here the clinical hours are exactly the same number of hours in the ADN program and the BSN program.
  12. 0
    I believe it is more a matter of the requirements since Pay is equal. I had wanted to get into a BSN program but I found that they are often more competitive than the ADN and diploma programs. Right now the best thing is to get into a program quickly. You can always advance your degree down the line and once you have the RN license it will be easier to attend a bridge program. Many RN-BSN and LPN-BSN programs out their. The purpose is to get into a program. If you can get into a BSN right away then it makes more sense to do a BSN. Less time spent in school and less student loans to payback.

    Get in where you fit in.


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