ADN to BSN

  1. 0
    I was wondering how much more schooling or classes is required b/w the two degrees and do you have to take the NCLEX again after the BSN is completed, even though you took it after completing the ADN?
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  5. 0
    approx 15 months
  6. 0
    you only take the NCLEX once. You can take it after your recieve your ADN or ASN degree and then go back to school and get your BSN and you don't need to take the NCLEX again .. i am a BSN and i think ADN or ASN's only need another year of classes to get a BSN degree. depends on the school the courses required to get your BSN. a RN is a RN ADN or BSN,,,, good luck in your schooling !!
  7. 0
    Depends on the program. I'm going to a state college, and it's 6 10 weeks courses, but I have summers off so it'll take two years about part time. But I've done a lot of the upper division general ed as well. It usually takes approximately two years though, more or less depending on the program.
    The NCLEX is only taken once. I took it after my associate's degree, you will never have to take it again unless you allow your license to lasp.
  8. 0
    The program I am applying to is two years.

    Tait
  9. 0
    Has anyone ever taken RN-to-BSN required classes while in the ADN program? After transferring those classes, did it shorten the length of the BSN program?
  10. 1
    Many/most BSN completion programs are set up with specific nursing courses required and also with specific courses that are not within nursing. These other course can be pre-requisite course that must be taken before you start the nursing classes ... and/or there can be non-nursing classes that you can take either before, during, or after the nursing ones.

    So ... how long it takes to complete a particular program depends both on the specific courses required and also the number of qualifying classes a person may have taken previously. For example, someone may have taken a lot of the required classes as part of the ADN program or as part of getting another degree. If those courses qualify for credit in the BSN program, the student may have very few classes to take other then the required nursing classes. However, another student going to the same BSN completion program may have graduated from an ADN program with a minimal number of college-level courses in other fields (sciences, social sciences, etc.). That 2nd person may have several more courses they need to take.

    So ... you not only have to look at the program requirements, you have to look at your own background/transcript to see how many of the courses you have taken in the past will count towards the BSN. You also may have to have someone from the school officially evaluate your academic record to determine which or your previous courses qualify for credit towards your BSN and which will not.
    tokidoki7 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from Chocobean
    Has anyone ever taken RN-to-BSN required classes while in the ADN program? After transferring those classes, did it shorten the length of the BSN program?
    You could complete some or all of the required general education courses, but RN-to-BSN programs require that you be a licensed RN to be accepted into the program, so I doubt it would be possible to take any of the nursing classes.
  12. 0
    I'm doing an online RN-BSN program right now. I have to take 10 classes, it will take me 9 months to complete. I'll be done the end of March 2010 and am looking at Grad schools for the MSN-NP.

    Good luck if you choose to go, it isn't anything like doing your ADN, it isn't super easy but there is much less pressure because there is no NCLEX waiting for you at the end. You can actually enjoy the classes.

    Sue, RN
  13. 2
    Quote from elkpark
    You could complete some or all of the required general education courses, but RN-to-BSN programs require that you be a licensed RN to be accepted into the program, so I doubt it would be possible to take any of the nursing classes.

    I think that has traditionally been the case, but some RN-BSN programs do allow ADN students to begin core RN-BSN coursework during the last year or so of their ADN programs. There are a couple state universities in my area that allow this. For these state universities, basically, if accepted, and certain strict entrance requirements are met, like a certain ADN GPA, the ADN student can complete all the RN-BSN coursework except any RN-BSN classes requiring a clinical aspect or capstone project. For one RN-BSN program in my state this means you could (hypothetically) complete about 75% of the core RN-BSN class credits while in the ADN program.

    In my state, it also helps if you are attending a state community college ADN program because the curriculum is coordinated with the state university's RN-BSN program. If attending a private ADN program, you can't begin the RN-BSN program before RN licensure, since the curriculum isn't coordinated between the schools.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Jul 28, '09
    cardiacRN2006 and elkpark like this.


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