Brand new rad rn program, needs advice

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    We are a small hospital, just starting a rad rn program. Currently there are a handful of standing orders for some procedures, that's about it. The dept. director, a rad tech background, has no idea what to do with me, the techs look at me like I'm from Mars, and I just want to "do it right" and cya at the same time. I need your input, share forms, discharge instructions, protocols, any sage advice would be appreciated.
  2. 2 Comments so far...

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    Do they have ANY idea what they hired you to do???
    Major duty of most rad rns is moderate sedation, so start there. Get a copy of your facility's moderate sedation policy and memorize it, lol! Approach the techs to help teach you what they know about the exams. This may be tricky, as you're "the intruder," "the outsider," encroaching on their territory. They have a lot of experience to offer (hopefully!), try not to make enemies in the ranks.
    Find the dept P/P (Policy and Procedure) manual and familiarize yourself with it, as well as the procedures you'll be helping with. You'll probably identify one or more of the Radiologists who likes to teach, and who appreciates an attentive, interested learner (which you are, right??!!) -- listen and learn. You hopefully will slowly gain experience with the procedures, get to know the techs and they in turn will come to recognize that you bring special skills and expertise to the dept, which enhance patient care; they'll come to trust you, and, again hopefully, you'll begin working as a team.
    If you can provide more info about the environment and duties, that would help. You might consider joining ARNA (American Radiological Nurses Association), either for your area's chapter (if one exists) or just to receive the quarterly publication and attend the yearly meetings. Exposure, exposure, exposure!!
    Good luck! -- D
  4. 0
    Well, I do have a good grasp on the conscious sedation thing, do it all the time for TEE and cardioversions. And I am familiar with writing procedures, etc. So far I have managed to wangle an ARNA membership and a NIBP monitor out of the dept manager. The whole uncharted territory thing is a little intimidating, especially since I am expected to continue all my other "duties" as well. thanks for the encouragement.
    Quote from dianah
    Do they have ANY idea what they hired you to do???
    Major duty of most rad rns is moderate sedation, so start there. Get a copy of your facility's moderate sedation policy and memorize it, lol! Approach the techs to help teach you what they know about the exams. This may be tricky, as you're "the intruder," "the outsider," encroaching on their territory. They have a lot of experience to offer (hopefully!), try not to make enemies in the ranks.
    Find the dept P/P (Policy and Procedure) manual and familiarize yourself with it, as well as the procedures you'll be helping with. You'll probably identify one or more of the Radiologists who likes to teach, and who appreciates an attentive, interested learner (which you are, right??!!) -- listen and learn. You hopefully will slowly gain experience with the procedures, get to know the techs and they in turn will come to recognize that you bring special skills and expertise to the dept, which enhance patient care; they'll come to trust you, and, again hopefully, you'll begin working as a team.
    If you can provide more info about the environment and duties, that would help. You might consider joining ARNA (American Radiological Nurses Association), either for your area's chapter (if one exists) or just to receive the quarterly publication and attend the yearly meetings. Exposure, exposure, exposure!!
    Good luck! -- D


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