resp therapy vs RN

  1. 0
    Hi I am a student and am lookng for some opinions/advice. Our local ADN program is impacted to the gills (even with top grades, still a minimum of two year wait to enter the program). Our local RT program is wide open and recruiting (with CAs filthy air, lots of need for RTs) THe prereqs are the same, the programs are the same length, the starting wages/bonuses are the same (roughly). My question is, do you think this might be a good option? The RT instructors have been visiitng the prereq classes and touting how much faster their program is becuase they have no impaction, plus smaller class sizes and student/teacher ratios.

    Laura
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  4. 0
    Quote from obeyacts2
    Hi I am a student and am lookng for some opinions/advice. Our local ADN program is impacted to the gills (even with top grades, still a minimum of two year wait to enter the program). Our local RT program is wide open and recruiting (with CAs filthy air, lots of need for RTs) THe prereqs are the same, the programs are the same length, the starting wages/bonuses are the same (roughly). My question is, do you think this might be a good option? The RT instructors have been visiitng the prereq classes and touting how much faster their program is becuase they have no impaction, plus smaller class sizes and student/teacher ratios.

    Laura
    My friend had the same problem. She did the RN program and she is glad. When going to get a job she realized how many more options she has and the pay seemed a little better. (depending on where you are) Think about your future and what you want to be doing long term. Make sure you make the choice for what you want not who may be avail.
  5. 2
    I'm a relatively new RN and wondered this same thing a few years ago. My daughter has been an RRT for about 6 years with experience in NICU, ER and CVICU so I'll simply tell you what she told me . . .

    "While I love being an RRT, more often than not I feel the job is too mechanical than anything else. It just doesn't have enough in the career field to interest me. I know you (Dad) and really think you should go the RN route. While the pay starts off about the same, RNs pay over time increases substantially higher than RRTs and oftens hundreds of other specialty options."

    My nursing class had two RRTs (one had 14 years experience and the other had 23 years) working towards their RN and told me her comments were quite accurate.

    My daughter is currently in a Pharmacy doctoral program but still works as an RRT on the weekends PRN.

    Hope this helps.

    Phil
    RT21 and cspryFA like this.
  6. 0
    While you may make more money and have more job opportunities, you'll certainly inherit all that is wrong with health care.

    Our RT's are CRUISIN' compared to what we go through in 12 hours a day. And they don't have the family crap to put up with as much as we do.

    We've got a Viet Vet RN who gave it up to manage vents and he's happy. Been with it a long time and makes as much as we do and he's STRESS FREE.

    Don't be a nurse.
  7. 0
    Hi,

    I'm a RRT,RPFT and in Feb of this year will have 14yrs in RT. I am in my 2nd semester of nursing school. The job options in RT is somewhat limited but RT can be a rewarding field. Although we may not "put up with" family "stuff" as much as the nurses do, we do have to deal with some unpleasant situations. When working with sick people, one will always deal with such situations. I have chosen nursing because my desire is to be a physician's extender, i.e. nurse practitioner. Whatever choice you make, RRT or RN, it will be a good one because they both are rewarding and needed. As for pay, in Va. where I live, the RN's make more than RRT's; quite a bit more. Job opportunities, pay, etc., depends on where you live and it sure wouldn't hurt to talk to some new nursing and resp. grads.
  8. 1
    Honestly, if you have a two year wait, I say go for the RT program. It seems like a rewarding career and I think there are plenty of opportunities out there. You can always go back for your RN and you will be cross trained as a respiratory therapist. I think RT skills would be great to know if you want to go into critical care too.
    carol9a likes this.
  9. 0
    I have been an RRT and an RN for several years. I enjoy doing both jobs and all at the same time. As far as wages go, RN's get paid more in the long run.
  10. 0
    Quote from obeyacts2
    Hi I am a student and am lookng for some opinions/advice. Our local ADN program is impacted to the gills (even with top grades, still a minimum of two year wait to enter the program). Our local RT program is wide open and recruiting (with CAs filthy air, lots of need for RTs) THe prereqs are the same, the programs are the same length, the starting wages/bonuses are the same (roughly). My question is, do you think this might be a good option? The RT instructors have been visiitng the prereq classes and touting how much faster their program is becuase they have no impaction, plus smaller class sizes and student/teacher ratios.

    Laura

    One needs to know what they can stomach. We have a saying around my hospital, Nurses takes care of the BROWN stuff and the RTs take care of the GREEN stuff.

    As for me I chose RT and I am very happy.
  11. 0
    Quote from obeyacts2
    Hi I am a student and am lookng for some opinions/advice. Our local ADN program is impacted to the gills (even with top grades, still a minimum of two year wait to enter the program). Our local RT program is wide open and recruiting (with CAs filthy air, lots of need for RTs) THe prereqs are the same, the programs are the same length, the starting wages/bonuses are the same (roughly). My question is, do you think this might be a good option? The RT instructors have been visiitng the prereq classes and touting how much faster their program is becuase they have no impaction, plus smaller class sizes and student/teacher ratios.

    Laura

    hi laura.
    My sister is an RN and I am an RT student. Also my husband is almost done with his RN.
    My sister told me that if you like more patient care then go for RN but if you like technology and health care then go for RT.
    I like the technology and the healthcare, I was going to go for Radiology Technology but I waited 2 years, did all my pre reqs and general ed. but I still didnt get in. Its the same thing with the nursing program.
    SO i decided to go for RT since theres no waiting list. Before any of these , I orginally was going for RN but I like to work on a specific. I dont like to work all over areas. I also dont like more patient care. I dont mind some but I rather go in and out of the patient room. I also dont like to dress wounds all the time and i dont like to take care of bed sores. No poops for me either. I like to be technical and do some healthcare at the same time.
    If you like what I dont like then definitely go for RN.
    Last edit by RISIA on Dec 24, '05
  12. 0
    Quote from obeyacts2
    Hi I am a student and am lookng for some opinions/advice. Our local ADN program is impacted to the gills (even with top grades, still a minimum of two year wait to enter the program). Our local RT program is wide open and recruiting (with CAs filthy air, lots of need for RTs) THe prereqs are the same, the programs are the same length, the starting wages/bonuses are the same (roughly). My question is, do you think this might be a good option? The RT instructors have been visiitng the prereq classes and touting how much faster their program is becuase they have no impaction, plus smaller class sizes and student/teacher ratios.

    Laura
    Dear Laura:

    I've been an RRT for 30 years, and remained academically active and ultimatly earned an MS in Respiratory Physiology. I'm now in a bridge program and completing an RN on-line, which is an option open to a RRT.

    My advice is a combination of both is a good idea, and with the present congestion of applicants to RN programs, you could opt to " kill 2 birds with one stone" I would advise that being an RT has its downside. While you are vital to the delivery of critical care your efforts are often over shadowed by RNs. Historically the relationships between the 2 professsions (depending on where you live) has been arduous. There is an old expression RTs and RNs get along like 2 dogs with 1 bone.

    These 2 professions need to mend fences and blend skills, so my advice go for both first RT then bridge to RN. Persons, with dual degrees could contribute greatly to this goal.

    Best of luck to you.
    Tom MS RRT


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