Asthma, are we teaching enough?

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    Ok so here is my story/comment

    I was diagnosed with asthma when i was 2 years old, I've had it ever since. I never grew out of it as I was told I could it only became much less frequent but unfortunatly much more severe. It often comes with colds, flu, any sort of lung issues. But I've never considered it very severe.

    I'm in nursing school my and as I learn more about the seriouseness of asthma I can think back to all the times I had ignored my asthma, either not taking the drugs on time or at all, or playing some sport that i probly shouldn't (I played rep hockey as a kid, and was the only girl on the guys team, my theory was if i didn't tell my coach i could play, and the body could go 4 minutes without oxigen and a shift on the ice was normally a minute so i'd be good) This hockey theory got my in trouble by my parents and coaches but i saugh it as a pain in the @$$ more than a warning, just hid it better next time. They stopped trusting me with my asthma after i passed out a couple of times either at practice or on the bench after a couple hard shifts.

    So this leads me to my question as i learn more about asthma and how seriouse it is are we teaching the patients enough (especially kids) or was a just pig headed? and wouldn't lisen?
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    Quote from Still Riding
    Ok so here is my story/comment

    So this leads me to my question as i learn more about asthma and how seriouse it is are we teaching the patients enough (especially kids) or was a just pig headed? and wouldn't lisen?
    i'm a paeds nurse and a mom of 3 boys who all have asthma (associated with colds) As far as teaching goes in children i think teaching parents is the most important part, they too teach their children.In my experience parents give the impression they understand but they dont fully and for seem reason they dont ask questions. This leads to poor inhaler technique and child has repeated attacks. Older children, like my 11 yr old son have to be constantly reminded to take inhaler. I think this is a peer thing. He says other people dont take inhalers (which of course is untrue) and is embarressed to take it infront of his peers. He knows the complications of not taking them but i think its 'it wont happen to me' attitude. He throws a strop but i make him take it.

    i also think when docs explain to parents sometimes they can be too technical and leads to confusion. When i teach inhaler technique first i teach parents then the child at a level they understand. It seems to work well.
  6. 0
    There are so many things that we are learning about asthma, non-atopic vs atopic, RSV bronciolitis and wheezing. It is an exciting time to work in asthma care management. One of the interventions that we under use, in my opinion, are the asthma camps. Most local American Lung Associations have a camp where children can learn about how to be a kid with asthma, be with other kids that have asthma and be medically supervised. The research indicates that children who've been to asthma camp have better clinical and utilization outcomes.


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