Calling All Ph Nurses

  1. Ok, So I have been offered a job with PH, I wanna hear from you PH nurses, do you like your job, what do you do? How long have you done it? What are the pros and cons?

    Any info. help.
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   phn92
    I've been in Public Health for about 10 years now. Our health dept covers home health, communicable diseases, immmunizations, and health education. Every health dept functions differently. so you need to ask what areas do they cover.

    I like the diversity in my job like dealing with all kinds of age groups. There is a lot of teaching and one on one. The hours are good for me and you usually get most holidays off.

    The pay is often lower than what nurses usually make. You don't always go into very nice places, I've been in some homes that I just stand in the middle of the room because of the cockroaches! Headlice is NOT one of my favorites things to deal with!!

    Overall I do enjoy my job, like anything in life there are pros and cons. I definitely plan to stay where I am in my career!
  4. by   SherryG
    I've only been in public health for a year, but it is the best job I've had in 18 years of nursing. The pay is not great but the benefits are wonderful- 40 hour weeks, enough CEUs to start my own college and opportunity for new experiences continuously.
  5. by   LaurenmomRN
    I've been in public health for seven years. I love my job, the home visits, immunizations, teaching, basically anything to do with the patients. The hours, holidays, and benefits are awesome. The only thing I don't like is the politics that's involved with a state position. Other than that I love the variety and the autonomy.
  6. by   CCATT
    What is the difference between public health nursing and family nursing?
  7. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I have a AAS degree in nursing. Could I quality as a public health nurse without a BSN?

    What if I got a BS in public or allied health instead?

    Please advise.
  8. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Bump
  9. by   valk
    Originally posted by Hellllllo Nurse
    I have a AAS degree in nursing. Could I quality as a public health nurse without a BSN?

    What if I got a BS in public or allied health instead?

    Please advise.
    Hi Hellllllo,
    I've been working public health since 1992. My health department hires BSNs as Public Health Nurses & Diploma & Associate Degree nurses as Jr. Public Health Nurses. Supervisory positions require an MPH.
    Last time I checked there were @ 100 openings for Jr. PHNs.
    Why not check with your local Health Dept? Good luck.
    Valk
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Thank you,
    Valk!
  11. by   phn92
    I know our state recommends a BSN for a Public Health Nurse. Our health board doesn't require it, due to our rural area and the nursing shortage. My superviser is a Diploma nurse and I have a AD in nursing. We have just two nurses for our county. Most nurses with a BSN don't want the low salary that our county pays. I figure with the hours we have and holidays off, I think it balances out!

    Are there any other PH nurses out there?
  12. by   futurenurse66
    To the PH nurses,

    I am at the beginning of a BSN program. I am single with a 7-year-old daughter. Since I am a single mom, I am thinking of eventually getting into PH nursing because of the day hours, weekends off and no holidays. However, I didn't know about the home inspections. How often are these done?

    I logged on to our state web state of public health and saw that there was an opening for a PH nurse I, PH nurse II, a PH nurse specialist and a PH consultant. The pay was a low as $31,000 and as high as $67,000. -- doesn't sound too bad, especially with the benefits of being able to spend nights, w'ends and holidays with family.

    However, I since I would not want to forget all my nursing skills, I would consider working a few days a month in a hospital.

    I welcome any and all comments! Thanks
  13. by   Pam Pam
    Public health nursing is a very diverse job. Most health departments are getting out of the business of providing clinics such as general medical, primary care, maternity, and pediatrics; however, some clinics are mandated such as family planning, immunization, and sexually transmitted disease. Requirements may vary from state to state. I have worked as a Public Health Nurse for the past 14 years and overall I have enjoyed my work, but like any job, to be truthful, it has its ups and downs. The benefits are usually good and the hours were excellent until the country was inundated with 911 and the threat of bioterrorism. The salary is the worst among health care settings. Clients are diverse, unappreciative, indigent, uneducated, and difficult in most circumstances but tolerate it because of the cultural circumstances that you know they face 24--7. However, you can learn much from them--coping skills, stress management, and survival skills which every nurse needs in order to work in the bottom-line atmosphere that health care breeds in this millennium.

    Pam Pam
  14. by   Frogman
    Originally posted by valk
    Hi Hellllllo,
    I've been working public health since 1992. My health department hires BSNs as Public Health Nurses & Diploma & Associate Degree nurses as Jr. Public Health Nurses. Supervisory positions require an MPH.
    Last time I checked there were @ 100 openings for Jr. PHNs.
    Why not check with your local Health Dept? Good luck.
    Valk
    Can you tell me more about this? I posted on this site a survey to assess other health department's nursing salaries. I am attempting to work with our HR department to better the situation.

    What is the amount of experience required to work as a nurse?
    What is the usual salary?
    Is there other benefits that the organization provides in leu of pay? (ie: pay for nursing license, overtime, CEU opportunies etc)

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