Organic Effective Disorder

  1. Hello I am hoping someone can help me, as I am writing my first care plan. I need to have definitions of all my patient's medical diagnosis. In her chart it said Organic Effective Disorder, so I looked this up and can't find anything. WHne I did an online search after looking in my Taber's it came up Organic Affective Disorder.....which is correct and what is the definition of this disorder? ALso when I pulled up OAD, bipolar came up, are they one in the same? Thanks!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    It is organic affective disorder, but it's kind of old language (I'll bet it was not a psychiatrist who wrote that dx). "Affective disorder" is a generic term that refers to the entire group of what are also called "mood disorders" -- all the variants of depression and bipolar disorder (there are many possibilities). "Organic" means that the illness is related to a specific physical/medical condition -- for example, the dramatic mood changes some people experience after a stroke. The person may appear to have bipolar disorder, but it's a sequela of the stroke, not "bipolar disorder" in the conventional sense of the term. There are many physical illnesses and syndromes (as well as many drugs) that can produce concommitant mood disorders.

    You might try doing a 'Net seach for "organic mood disorder" and you may get better results (i.e., sources that you can use). Good luck!
  4. by   Thunderwolf
    Quote from elkpark
    It is organic affective disorder, but it's kind of old language (I'll bet it was not a psychiatrist who wrote that dx). "Affective disorder" is a generic term that refers to the entire group of what are also called "mood disorders" -- all the variants of depression and bipolar disorder (there are many possibilities). "Organic" means that the illness is related to a specific physical/medical condition -- for example, the dramatic mood changes some people experience after a stroke. The person may appear to have bipolar disorder, but it's a sequela of the stroke, not "bipolar disorder" in the conventional sense of the term. There are many physical illnesses and syndromes (as well as many drugs) that can produce concommitant mood disorders.

    You might try doing a 'Net seach for "organic mood disorder" and you may get better results (i.e., sources that you can use). Good luck!
    Excellent post, as always, Elkpark.
  5. by   NurseRock
    Thanks to all for guiding me with your answers. I appreciate it so much!
  6. by   lovinghands
    When I worked at a CD tx center in the early 90's mood disorders that were biochemical were often called organic (ie organic depression) vs situational depression. This is old terminology used at that time by a psychologist. When I hear organic now, I automatically think of brain injury (ie stroke, trauma, etc)

    Good post!

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