Lexapro - page 9

Is anyone here taking Lexapro? Care to share you expirences with it, any s/e? Thanks!... Read More

  1. by   emllpn2006
    My husband was on Lexapro for a few months it seemed to be working quite well but he did have sleeping and sexual problems during this time. He has since been changed to Symbyax (spelling ?) this seems to woek much better. But it is very expensive - over 400.00 monthly for 30 pills. Like someone else said though in depression and psychiatric durgs what works for one may not work for another. He was actually on 4 differnet medications before found one that worked.
  2. by   CharlieRN
    Quote from WhichOldWitch?
    [FONT=System]I've been taking Celexa 20mg for about 1 year and my doc is changing me to Lexapro. She gave me 10mg samples but didnt recommend how to actually switch and I didnt think to ask her. Does anyone know what the protocol is for changing these meds? Do I just stop celexa 20mg one day and start Lexapro 10mg the next?


    [FONT=System] :spin: :spin: <---------me
    [FONT=System]AAhhahahaha!!
    Call the doc and ask! That's what she gets the big bucks for. Some transitions need to be tapered. I could look it up and tell you what the books say, but then I'd be practicing medicine.
  3. by   blueberry21
    Quote from CharlieRN
    Call the doc and ask! That's what she gets the big bucks for. Some transitions need to be tapered. I could look it up and tell you what the books say, but then I'd be practicing medicine.

    Ok CharlieRN thanks, I talked to her this morning.

    She also said that you should up your meds.
  4. by   Jo Dirt
    Well, here is mine. I started Lexapro 10 mg after suffering a near mental breakdown a couple of years ago. The major S/E's I dealt with were loss of appetite (I can't complain about THAT though), jaw clenching, holding my mouth back a funny way when I spoke (weirdest thing, I realized I was holding my mouth funny when I would talk but I couldn't help it!) and my affect was flat.

    I also want to mention I feel like Lexapro saved my life. Before I started Lexapro I was a raving lunatic and had terrible depression and mood swings with anxiety. Within a week I was feeling much better emotionally. This proves to me that, in spite of the negative S/E's I experienced, it was MUCH more preferable to have the physical ailments than the mental ones. I felt like a bird out of a cage. It didn't matter that I was big and fat and ugly and a loser, I was okay with it.

    I'm disappointed, though, because I went off the medication for awhile and of course I ended up with my depression again but the next time around I did not feel the benefits. So I started 20 mg but then I started having heart palpitations and quit.

    I need something, though. It really frustrates me when people think that those who take antidepressants do so because they don't want to deal with their problems like other people have to. Some depression may be a result of life happening or negative thinking that a person is in control of, but the truth is, many times, it isn't a matter of "snapping out of it."
    I want to smack people when they say this.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Aug 13, '06
  5. by   Sheri257
    I don't think you can just "snap out of it." It took me several years to get out of depression.

    But my doctor insisted that we do it without meds. She said I'd be better off without the drugs and that if I beat the depression without the meds I would be better off in the long run. And, quite frankly, she was right. I've never taken an anti-depressant and I don't have a problem with depression anymore.

    Personally, I'm really glad she took that stance because I learned how to cope without the drugs. Besides, I just don't like the idea of having to take a pill to feel better. Drugs may be a short term solution but, I don't think they can address or fix the root causes of depression.

    Just my opinion.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Aug 11, '06
  6. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from lizz
    I don't think you can just "snap out of it." It took me several years to get out of depression.

    But my doctor insisted that we do it without meds. She said I'd be better off without the drugs and that if I beat the depression without the meds I would be better off in the long run. And, quite frankly, she was right. I've never taken an anti-depressant and I don't have a problem with depression anymore.

    Personally, I'm really glad she took that stance because I learned how to cope without the drugs. Besides, I just don't like the idea of having to take a pill to feel better. Drugs may be a short term solution but, I don't think they can address or fix the root causes of depression.

    Just my opinion.

    :typing
    It isn't a matter of "learning how to cope" or a "bad attitude" in many cases. I lived with it for many years because I didn't want to be "doped up on medication." There are some people who CANNOT come out of depression by learning how to cope, because that isn't the issue. When I finally admitted to myself I needed to give medication a try that was the single best decision I made for myself in a long, long time.
    I'll agree there are plenty of lousy attitudes and episodes of self pity that can be worked out with some diet, exercize and counseling, but someone who has never suffered from true depression cannot understand, and it only makes it worse when they allude that those who take medication are weak or don't try hard enough. In my case as well as many others, antidepressants will need to be taken the rest of my life. It is a mental illness just like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Antidepressants aren't a "quick fix" for people who don't want to make the effort to become better themselves. That is like Tom Cruise criticizing women who have post partum depression by saying they need to take vitamins and exercise to pull themselves out of it. What a %$^!.
    And yes, a pill is unfortunately what some people have to rely on to feel better. Just like diabetics have to rely on a pill or a shot. Or some people have to rely on a pill for their heart disease or their blood pressure. Perhaps we should flippantly tell them to learn to cope without medication.
    But depression is not life threatening? Tell that to families who have lost loved ones to suicide.
    Last edit by Jo Dirt on Aug 12, '06
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    It isn't a matter of "learning how to cope" or a "bad attitude" in many cases. I lived with it for many years because I didn't want to be "doped up on medication." There are some people who CANNOT come out of depression by learning how to cope, because that isn't the issue. When I finally admitted to myself I needed to give medication a try that was the single best decision I made for myself in a long, long time.
    I'll agree there are plenty of lousy attitudes and episodes of self pity that can be worked out with some diet, exercize and counseling, but someone who has never suffered from true depression cannot understand, and it only makes it worse when they allude that those who take medication are weak or don't try hard enough. In my case as well as many others, antidepressants will need to be taken the rest of my life. It is a mental illness just like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Antidepressants aren't a "quick fix" for people who don't want to make the effort to become better themselves. That is like Tom Cruise criticizing women who have post partum depression by saying they need to take vitamins and exercise to pull themselves out of it. What a %$^!.
    And yes, a pill is unfortunately what some people have to rely on to feel better. Just like diabetics have to rely on a pill or a shot. Or some people have to rely on a pill for their heart disease or their blood pressure. Perhaps we should flippantly tell them to learn to cope without medication.
    But depression is not life threatening? Tell that to families who have lost loved ones to suicide.
    You're jumping to conclusions. I didn't allude that people are weak or didn't try hard enough. I didn't say depression is not life threatening. I didn't say that depression is not a mental illness either.

    If you feel you need the drugs, ok. But, as you pointed out, there are side effects, etc. that eventually prompted you to stop taking some of them. This is why drugs may only be a short term solution. This is also why my doctor didn't want me to take the meds in the first place. She felt I would be better off in the long run without them.

    For me, beating depression took years. Even when I was feeling my worst, my doctor did not want to give me the meds. She said I would feel a lot worse before I felt better but it was a normal part of the process of getting better for the long term without the drugs.

    All I'm suggesting is that there are ways to beat depression without the drugs and all of the associated complications that occur with drugs ... especially if you can find a really good doctor who wants to help you get better for the long run.

    Personally, I can't thank my doctor enough. I am forever in her debt, really.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Aug 13, '06
  8. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from lizz
    Personally, I can't thank my doctor enough. I am forever in her debt, really.

    :typing
    Well, we have some kind of miracle worker. With what you insist she can do we could empty out mental hospitals and shut mental health clinics and pharmaceutical companies down.

    I'm very skeptical, myself, that what was going on was a true case of mental depression.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    Well, we have some kind of miracle worker. With what you insist she can do we could empty out mental hospitals and shut mental health clinics and pharmaceutical companies down.

    I'm very skeptical, myself, that what was going on was a true case of mental depression.
    So ... am I supposed to be skeptical and pre-judge your diagnosis as well because we have a different view of the situation?

    Just because I'm suggesting alternatives to medication .... medication which you previously mentioned you had to stop taking because of adverse effects ... you're questioning my diagnosis? That I wasn't a true case of mental depression?

    I was hospitalized twice. The "miracle" as you put it ... took ten years.

    If it makes you feel better ... go ahead. Thankfully, I do feel better ... without the meds.

    If meds work for you ... fine. What's wrong with suggesting alternatives, especially if you have problems with adverse effects like what you previously mentioned?

    :typing
  10. by   rn/writer
    It's time to take a couple of deep breaths and a couple of steps back from the intensity that is starting to develop. Intensity isn't bad in and of itself but when it's linked with negativity, it can get hurtful and ugly.

    On the topic of treatment for mental illness, what works for one may not work for another. What works for someone now might lose its effectiveness down the road. Side effects and adverse effects are always a consideration. There are trade-offs only the person who is taking the meds is in a position to evaluate.

    It's wonderful to be able to learn to manage depression without meds. I don't think anyone would argue otherwise. But some folks may not survive long enough to complete the process if they don't buy the time they need to deal with root causes. Others may live but end up with terribly messed up bodies and lives because of the things they have done under the influence of great pain. Families have been destroyed in trying to help and handle someone who is severely depressed.

    If taking meds can slow or even stop the destruction, maybe that is the best choice possible for some.

    Don't forget that depression can be intrinsic (originating on the INside--organic brain lesions, chemical imbalances, etc.), extrinsic (originating on the OUTside--situational depression, drugs, alcohol, abuse, etc.) or a combination of both.

    One size fits all treatment ends up shortchanging everyone to some degree. The best approach is the one that works. And that can vary from person to person, from time to time, and from situation to situation. A good example of variability within a single person is the case of a child who has one treatment regimen during the school year and another for holidays and the summer. As his situation produces different demands and stressors, so his schedule is adapted by changing meds, dosages, administration times, therapy appointments, and other options.

    There are so many out there who don't understand the great weight mental illness places on individuals, families and communities. It would be great if those of us who do have some awareness could refrain from adding to the burdens and actually offer each other companionship and support, even if there are differences of opinion regarding treatment details.

    In the end, each of us is accountable for his or her own choices. We're the only ones who can count the cost to ourselves and our loved ones.

    Please be good to yourselves and to each other. Caring and being cared for has universal application and is habit-forming in the nicest possible way.

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