Do I NEED Med-Surg training to be a psych nurse? - page 3

I'm sure this has been posted a gazillion times before, and I appreciate in advance any replies! Do you guys think that psych nurses need experience in med/surg before going into psych nursing? ... Read More

  1. by   tricia1
    Quote from EarthChild1130
    I'm sure this has been posted a gazillion times before, and I appreciate in advance any replies!

    Do you guys think that psych nurses need experience in med/surg before going into psych nursing? Why or why not??

    Thanks!
    The only thing I would add to all the great replies is if you do only Psych. Nursing first I have seen several RNs that personally felt limited when they wanted to make a change out of psych nursing. I had the experience of needing to assure an interviewer one time that I did do/could do "regular" medical type nursiing which I was easily able to do as yes in Psych you are the person resonsible for your patient's health. They are really almost more complicted to "nurse" medically because they are often non-compliant and not accurate reporters/historians and you have to be that much more vigilant.
  2. by   HarryPotter
    I agree. I went right from Nursing School into Psych and there have been many times that I wished I had more of the "medical" experience as a RN, mainly because that would make it easier for me to land more jobs that are not psych. related. However, on that note, I have been a Psych RN since 1973 and never have had a problem getting a job as a RN in psych. When I have been a patient in a hospital and saw how overlyworked the Nurses seemed to be, I did not regret not getting into that field.
    All of Nursing includes the whole person anyway. I found the "medical" nurses very helpful for me emotionally when I was in the hospital.
    As a psych nurse, I do lots of the more "Medical" things, as vital signs, blood drawing, injections, going over lab. results, referring to a PCP when I determine a problem, etc.
  3. by   CharlieRN
    Another point; Frequently on a psych unit, the "Doctor" is a psychiatrist. He or she is even more of a specalist than the RN who went direct to psych from nursing school. Psychiatrists very often depend heavily on nurses to alert them that something is physiclly wrong.

    Hukilau said she was lucky to work with a team having varied backgrounds and strenghts. "When teamwork and trust are working properly the combination of skills of 3 or 4 nurses can handle just about anything." Indeed you are lucky. At my facility there are 4 nurses in the entire hospital on the night shift. One on each of the, locked, inpatient wards and one, me, supervising them, giving nursing support to the 5 unlocked, residential, units, and doing admissions.

close