Working 60 hrs a week while in Nursing school????

  1. 0
    Does anyone recommend working 60 hrs a week and going to Nursing school full time? I'm a Home Health Aide and I find that I have the time to read and study while my client is watching tv or sleeping.

    What do you guys think?

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  2. 19 Comments...

  3. 0
    What country are you in? If it's anything like here in the UK, you will absolutely not be able to work a 60 hour week whilst going to school/university. The course here includes a placement at a hospital, of which will be about 37 hours a week, as well as having to do essays, revision, study days etc.

    A 60 hour week is bad enough on it's own, never mind alongside studying! x
  4. 0
    That doesn't sound like a good idea.How would you do your clinicals and when would you sleep?
    Last edit by loriangel14 on Jan 13, '13
  5. 0
    In my program I don't think it'd be do-able at all considering 2nd-4th semester you have clinical 2-3 days a week for 8 hours a day...I'm not sure how you could even fit in all your classes/clinical and work 60 hours unless you never slept.

    I know people who worked 40 hours a week and did nursing school full time and got through it, but it was very very grueling for them.
  6. 0
    Ability to study at work helps but there is more to it than study hours.

    Most nursing schools are very inflexible as far as timing goes - especially clinical hours. They usually don't have a choice due to the limitations of available times/places to do the clinicals. It is common to have odd schedules like very early in the morning or late into the evening and to have a different schedule every week, or at least something more complicated than one schedule the first half of the semester and another the second half or to have different schedules alternate weeks.

    Another complications would be the lack of lead time in doing the required homework. A common scenario is: even if you know you will be writing a care plan for each clinical, you won't get the pt information needed to even start until a few hours before the clinical. Even if you usually get 3 or 4 hours of study time at your job, you probably can't count on it for sure.

    You could probably do the prereq classes while working that job, assuming you are normally on top of things.

    Edit to add: assuming you could fit the hours into a week. Out of curiosity: 168 hours in a week - 60 work = 108 - 56 sleep = 52 - 3 showers/brushing teeth = 49 - 12 class (for prereqs, nursing school is usually more) = 37. That leave 5 hours per day for sitting on the toilet, grocery shopping, laundry, exercise, travel time anywhere you go ... assuming you eat at work or in class and don't need to study or do homework at all other than at work.

    Hm, you would need to be REALLY on top of things and probably still need to live with someone willing to do all the shopping/cooking/laundry/getting gas or extra pencil leads/etc.
    Last edit by Saysfaa on Jan 13, '13
  7. 0
    I don't see working 60 hours a week feasible while trying to tackle nursing school.
  8. 0
    I don't have many responsibilities. Just wanted to save money but I guess I can cut down and work less hours. Nursing school is priority.
  9. 1
    You guess you can cut down? Did your advisors not tell you what the time requirement is for school? Our program doesn't recommend working at all. If you must, they say to keep it to 20 hours or less (if you're in the full time program).
    x_factor likes this.
  10. 0
    From what I've seen from your past postings, you're still doing pre-req classes, which explains why you find it manageable to work 60 hours a week and still study. Once you start actual nursing school, then attempt to work 60 hours a week. You'll figure out the answer real quick.
  11. 0
    Quote from x_factor
    From what I've seen from your past postings, you're still doing pre-req classes, which explains why you find it manageable to work 60 hours a week and still study. Once you start actual nursing school, then attempt to work 60 hours a week. You'll figure out the answer real quick.
    LMAO! Thanks!


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