What was your HS GPA & SAT score before getting accepted into nursing school? - page 2

I'm genuinely curious, what was your high school GPA and SAT score before getting into nursing school? Where did u go? Did any of you do the direct entry highschool to BSN route? I'm brand new to the community :) Glad to be here!... Read More

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    My local state university offers the direct entry into a BSN program for high schoolers. I had okay scores and okay high school gpa. I did it all on my own without any push from my parents so I had no idea how much better I could have done. I had a 3.4 high school gpa and a 1060 on my SAT. I have two Associate's degrees, one I graduated with a 3.92 and the other with a 3.97. One of which is my nursing degree, I'm now doing an online BSN program while working as an RN.
    kimbap likes this.

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    Quote from wordsofmymouth
    Hi! I've been through all of this, as I am in a four-year BSN program.

    First, you consider the university's general admission requirements (this should be on the website). You apply to the university (not the nursing school).

    Second, you meet with a freshman adviser and then you should ask to meet with the nursing school's adviser. They might say you just need to meet with the freshman adviser, but really push to meet with the actual nursing school's adviser, or at least an adviser who knows exactly how the nursing school considers applicants.

    Third, do really well in your prereqs during your freshman and sophomore years.

    Fourth, in your sophomore year apply to the nursing school, making sure that you meet the nursing school's admission requirements. While the university looked at your SAT score and HS transcript, the nursing school will look at your prereq GPA and possibly and entrance exam score.

    Fifth, pray you get in.

    I'm currently in the fifth category.

    This is the same for my four-year BSN program. The high school GPA and SAT scores didn't really matter for my nursing program, its only to get you in the university. After you get in, you have to work hard for those As in your pre-reqs. I took 2 of my pre-reqs in the first semester of my freshman year and I didn't know it would matter so much so I got Bs. Go talk to your nursing advisers, not the general ed advisers because sometimes they give you the wrong info (mines did =/) which wasted my time.

    I got in the program with 3 Bs but I got As in all the Bios and Chem classes.
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    So basically it's 'do you meet the entire schools requirements?' And then you need to pass the first year or two with flying colors to be accepted into the full program.

    Thank you for the advice , and good luck on #5 <3
    Guinevere39 likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from prenursingprincess
    So basically it's 'do you meet the entire schools requirements?' And then you need to pass the first year or two with flying colors to be accepted into the full program.

    Thank you for the advice , and good luck on #5 <3
    Exactly. Just keep in touch with the nursing adviser and he/she should help you get through it no problem!
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    ooohh good tip! Do you recommend trying to form some sort of relationship with the nursing adviser? If you maintain and keep in touch with them, do you believe it will provide some sort of an advantage?
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    My school does a direct entry from high school, but not a lot of people do it that way. It's a BSN program.

    I was a transfer student from a community college before I went to nursing school. I wasn't going to pay outrageous amounts of money for gen ed's (i.e., $428/credit hr vs $60/credit hr.). I did all the gen ed's I could at a fraction of the price before I transferred, and I do not regret it one bit.

    Anyway, my community college GPA was a 3.7 when I transferred. My high school one was a 3.8 or something. My ACT was a 26, but I didn't need it to get into my nursing school. It only helped me skip some math classes at the community college.

    If you could, you should save money by going the cheaper route for your prerequisites and then transfer. Unless you go to a community college for your nursing degree.

    I feel like I rambled. Hope this helps in some way!
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    Quote from prenursingprincess
    ooohh good tip! Do you recommend trying to form some sort of relationship with the nursing adviser? If you maintain and keep in touch with them, do you believe it will provide some sort of an advantage?
    I just asked a ton of questions and kept in touch via email before I got accepted. He gave me all the info I needed and was really nice, but I don't think it helped me get in. My GPA actually helped me get in (he told me).
    kimbap likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from prenursingprincess
    ooohh good tip! Do you recommend trying to form some sort of relationship with the nursing adviser? If you maintain and keep in touch with them, do you believe it will provide some sort of an advantage?
    I don't think it gives an advantage as in sucking up to the adviser equals getting into nursing school, but I do think it shows that you care, and because the nursing adviser is (or should be) very aware of the application process and what students who get in look like (as far as meeting the requirements), you will better know how you are doing and what you need to change. It's not like I talk to my adviser every week; usually I go to her office once a semester.


    Skips makes a good point; however, straight out of high school I wanted to go to a four year university and financially I was able to (and felt that the money spent would be worth it). Either way works though.
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    I took the ACT not the SAT, and I had a bachelors degree when I applied, so I think my HS GPA was pretty much ignored. I had a 28 ACT score and a college GPA of 3.8 when I applied and was accepted. I was accepted into an ADN program, quicker and cheaper than going for another bachelors degree.
    nguyency77 likes this.
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    I went directly into a BSN program from high school and it was exactly as the OP describes. There are MANY schools that do it this way as I was accepted into all 4 of the colleges that I applied to- into the nursing program- as a senior in high school. At my school, it was the route the vast majority of students took. The classes you needed to take began 1st semester freshman year and many of them were major restricted (meaning you could only register for them if you were a nursing major). If one did not transfer into the nursing school until sophomore year, that student was already 2 semesters behind.

    I had a 1310 on my SATs (back when 1600 was the max score) and a 4.0 GPA in High School, including 5 AP courses.
    Luckyyou likes this.


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